• @[email protected]
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      -210 months ago
      1. they are not breaking any law. This is totally allowed. You can use FOSS to create a commercial product.

      2. they are major contributors to the Linux space. And they’ll keep contributing.

      3. It’s their effort, they created a business around it, and it cycles back to push Linux forward.

      4. this isn’t even going to affect average users. This is going to take money from companies that probably have the money to pay. For other companies, there are other distributions available.

        • @[email protected]
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          10 months ago

          Well, the re-builders would be breaking the law now that the source code isn’t available for non-paying customers. They weren’t breaking the law before.

          So, do you expect every company to release the source code of their products just because they used a FOSS web framework or a FOSS programming language like Python? Or by the same logic, for companies to release the source code of their products if their developers use Linux in their development machines? Or if they use Linux to deploy their applications in the cloud? That’s such an unreasonable position.

            • @[email protected]
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              10 months ago

              OK, so is Redhat breaking any license? Do you really think a company like Redhat would open itself to thousands of lawsuits like that. The CEO already explained that this is totally legal and covered by GPL. They are in fact distributing the source to the people receiving the product. This is exactly what GPL says. They are not forced to open the source code to people who aren’t getting the distributed software.

              What is your complaint then? They are not breaking any law and they are following the GPL license.

              I was using the webframework/language as examples because you said this wasn’t a matter of law but a matter of principle. So why does the principle apply to Redhat but not the million other products that totally depend on FOSS on their core?

              So many projects do in fact distribute the FOSS, but they use more permissive licenses like MIT, Apache or LGPL. BUT you’re saying the law is not relevant, what matters is the principle. So why don’t everyone release their code if they depend on FOSS on their core products? Because they aren’t breaking the Apache or MIT licenses? Well, that’s great! Redhar isn’t breaking the GPL license either. Why must Redhat follow whatever subjective principles you have?

              — “hey there’s this company creating a commercial product around FOSS. They aren’t breaking any license.”

              — “Nice, as long as the licenses aren’t compromised”

              — “It’s Redhat”

              — “Those mofos! How dare they!”