• @[email protected]
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    10 months ago

    Agree and disagree. They put the cart before the horse on this one for sure. If we solve the problem of unaffordable education, then we can talk about forgiving the student loans of people who didn’t get to benefit from the new system

    Just forgiving the student loans of a seemingly random block of people makes no sense. The next generation and more importly the universities will expect us to do the same thing later. Guess what that means?

    Schools will raise their prices even more and kids will take on even more debt. We can’t just slap a bandaid on this and pat ourselves on the back

    • @tallwookie
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      10 months ago

      yeah, not sure how unaffordable education gets fixed though… or if it should even get fixed - higher education has historically been for those that could afford it. prior to the interwar years (between WW1 and WW2), very few people actually attended college. over time, college became just one more step in the natural order of things, even if it was not a financially viable decision.

      so here we are, where a large percentage of the population enters themselves into multi-decade debt because it’s expected of them, or because some occupations require significant investment into higher education (even if the person is unqualified to obtain that position - with or without education)

      should the government hand colleges a blank check so people avoid debt? I dont see that passing through Congress. should the government step in and tell private educational systems how much they can charge? I dont see that happening, ever.