Hey!

Currently doing drywall myself and I am using 6x6 cm squared timber around my outside walls.

The problem is they aren’t as stable as the other walls inside the house because of the 6x6 cm squared timbers that are about 30cm distance from each other.

I will screw my plasterboards on the squared timber and only one plasterboard, not two.

I have two pictures of what my construction looks like from far and one from close.

Maybe someone can give me advice before I install the plasterboard onto it.

The only problem I currently see is finding the subconstruction once I put the plasterboards back on. But other than that, if I find them can I install the cabinets safely?

    • @Pohl
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      3 months ago

      Yeah there is so much crazy shit going on in these pictures I am doubting my own understanding and I was a rough carpenter for several years.

      Why are the studs on the flat? Where the hell is that sill plate? No headers over the windows? No cripples under the windows? Is that stud next to the window opening cut at the bottom? Why are the studs spaced so… creatively

      I could probably spot a few more but I honestly think I just don’t know what this building is or where it is. Clearly not in US and maybe it’s a shed or something and not a dwelling. Too much I don’t know to talk shit.

      Edit: is there like an actual structural wall on the exterior that we cannot see? Maybe all this stuff is just to provide structure for drywall and electric. That would maybe make sense.

      • @NegativeLookBehind
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        3 months ago

        From the links he sent, it looks like he’s just building a non-structural insulating wall on the interior which allows for running electrical lines.

        • @Pohl
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          93 months ago

          I think you’re right. If this picture was taken in the US or Canada, I would be panicked for OP. But honestly I thing it might be something we don’t do here so it looks crazy, but only to us.

          • @scrion
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            53 months ago

            You’re right. After moving to Germany, I can tell there is nothing wrong with this picture, but it sure looks crazy out of context.

            Interestingly enough, most residential houses I looked at had solid, steel reinforced concrete walls everywhere.

          • roguetrick
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            43 months ago

            I think it just depends on how he’s attaching it. If it’s going into the top and sill plates behind the OSB, there’s not really much of a chance of it going anywhere.

            • @NegativeLookBehind
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              33 months ago

              But those gaps at the base, where the stud should be abutting a sill plate…what will the drywall be attached to?

              • roguetrick
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                3 months ago

                The sill plate is actually behind the OSB and looks thicker than anything we use. I don’t honestly know if there’s studs back there too, but I’d imagine so. I really don’t know how that wall is constructed.

        • @GrogonOP
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          13 months ago

          What does this mean? Am I doing something wrong?

          • roguetrick
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            3 months ago

            No, I was actually translating it for the American construction folks. What you’re doing is actually how we cover up plaster walls on remodels. It’s just not something I’ve ever dealt with when I was a construction supply salesperson.

      • @antidote101
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        23 months ago

        I worry they’re just attaching things to the cladding.

      • @NegativeLookBehind
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        23 months ago

        I thought they were flat too, but he said they’re square. I’m very confused.

    • @GrogonOP
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      33 months ago

      What do you mean? Sorry I am not english speaking.