Hey!

Currently doing drywall myself and I am using 6x6 cm squared timber around my outside walls.

The problem is they aren’t as stable as the other walls inside the house because of the 6x6 cm squared timbers that are about 30cm distance from each other.

I will screw my plasterboards on the squared timber and only one plasterboard, not two.

I have two pictures of what my construction looks like from far and one from close.

Maybe someone can give me advice before I install the plasterboard onto it.

The only problem I currently see is finding the subconstruction once I put the plasterboards back on. But other than that, if I find them can I install the cabinets safely?

  • themeatbridge
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    3 months ago

    My advice? Knock that “wall” down and pay a proper carpenter to build a proper one. Your studs are too small, they don’t go all the way down, you have no room for insulation, and if you try to hang cabinets on that thing, you’re going to kill someone when the whole sumbitch collapses.

    My bad, I didn’t know what I was looking at. See OP’s diagram to learn more about this, and ignore my ignorance.

      • Coskii
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        3 months ago

        That link is extremely helpful. It seems like you’re fine to attach cabinets to the wall after drywall. The osb is tied into some serious wood framing behind it, and as long as you’re using fasteners that reach into the osb, it should be about as solid as you could want.

        The kitchen metal grumpydaddy suggested isn’t expressly needed here, but that’s the most I’d consider doing to it.

      • themeatbridge
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        13 months ago

        Oh, I see. My apologies, I misunderstood what we were looking at. I thought the framing we see was the entire wall, but it’s just non-structural framing on the interior behind the plasterboard to allow space for wiring.

        I am not familiar with this style of construction, so I won’t guess at best practices for hanging cabinets on it. But I would imagine that as long as the wall we see is sufficiently secured to the structural wall behind it, you should be able to hang cabinets. To be safe, you could anchor into the wall, but I don’t know enough to say how to do that without interfering with insulation or vapor barriers.

    • @ikidd
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      83 months ago

      It’s just a subwall that’s adding a thermal break. Presumably it’s anchored to the existing wall.

    • @scrion
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      73 months ago

      Please have a look at the images he posted, the wall is absolutely fine. The images he posted are just the inner installation layer, the structural wall and insulation are behind that.