I got banned from a subreddit because the BBC changed the article title. There are just too many rules and too many bad rules.

  • @dhork
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    452 months ago

    It’s not bad rules, it’s bad moderation. They are way too quick with their ban hammer. And just wait until we get AI mods

    • @[email protected]
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      82 months ago

      I think part of it comes from moderators being overworked, which means they can’t take the time to investigate or understand nuance or context.

      In this respect, AI tools could be beneficial if used appropriately, though current moderation practices do not suggest this is likely.

      • HobbitFoot
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        42 months ago

        The whole way that Reddit moderates is based on moderator created tools, not anything Reddit made.

        A large part of the moderator rebellion was that moderators had developed tools to deal with moderation that were broken by killing API access.

        Reddit was slow to integrate moderator created tools and shit at creating new useful tools. I don’t see Reddit paying to develop an AI.

        • @[email protected]
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          12 months ago

          Yeah I agree but I think AI will soon enough become accessible for community made tools as well. This will be a boon for moderators but may also create new challenges in accountability and democracy in online spaces.

          • HobbitFoot
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            42 months ago

            The problem is that community made tools were severely restricted by Reddit pulling API access.

            A lot of the old moderators left. Reddit itself has shown that it does not want to create any sort of legitimacy or democracy in the moderation process because that legitimacy could override the admins’ legitimacy.

            • @[email protected]
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              2 months ago

              I agree completely but I think this discussion is relevant for Lemmy as well which has to some extent copied the same structure. While we do have more choice in terms of which admins we want to be under, the fundamental structure and tools are not that different.

              • HobbitFoot
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                22 months ago

                One thing to mention is that Lemmy divorced the role of admin and developer. You have a set of admins with a far larger latitude to act, but the developer level seems lacking to address these issues and the Lemmy developer level seems as to cloistered as the Reddit admin level.

    • @AA5B
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      22 months ago

      AI mods could be much better for cases like this. Imagine the mod responding immediately when you try to post something! If it’s a mistake, you could fix. If not, it may never even see the light of day

      Taking this post at face value, an AI mod could have acted immediately, before BBC changed their headline, so op would not have been banned for this reason

    • Rikudou_Sage
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      12 months ago

      I’m currently testing it actually. So far just letting it analyze whether swear words in the text are meant in an offensive way and if so, it reports the comment to me.