• @wjrii
    link
    English
    151 month ago

    This one’s mostly straightforward. Early (for north of the Alps) Renaissance painting of St. Liphard, a legendary 6th century French churchman who slew a local dragon. I can understand fudging the bishop’s robes for something more recognizable, but I have no fuckin’ clue why Jean Bourdichon decided to paint the dragon as a pissed-off housecat on a leash rather than, y’know, dead. We will need someone with far more skill in relating the mindset of the average French painter circa 1500.

    • @Son_of_dad
      link
      101 month ago

      I crack up at the idea of the catholic church to this day accepting that this guy did indeed defeat a dragon, and therefore indeed is a saint

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      71 month ago

      Really makes you think just how culturally biased wikipedia can be. Any other culture outside of Europe has a crazy story about monks slaying dragons, and wiki will pretext the story as mythology, or religious allegory. This article seems to adopt the position that France once had a Dragon problem…

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        31 month ago

        Wikipedia reflects the editors. This page was made by 2 guys and a citation not. The type of people who bother to create a page about an obscure Catholic saint are usually Catholics themselves.

        Meanwhile, the stories about far-off non-Western cultures are usually written by *philes (Japanophiles (aka weebs) write a lot of crap about Japan, for instance) or anthropologists. These are not the sort of people to actually believe in dragons.

    • no banana OP
      link
      41 month ago

      I guess he slew the dragon and tamed its offspring