At least 5 people have been cured of HIV. Is the AIDS pandemic ending?::undefined

  • @[email protected]
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    859 months ago

    As always, if a headline is in the form of a question, the answer is: No.

    As it was a few years ago, the only “cure” is bone marrow transplants from somebody with the gene variant that is resistant to HIV. And bone marrow transplants, since in their application need to wipe out your existing immune system, are riskier than just continuing to be on ART.

    The other potential cures in the article have only been tested on monkeys and mice, and even if they end up working on humans that’s many, many years away.

    The article is kind of a waste of time if you already know about the bone marrow application, as expected. Actually, that’s kind of harsh, it’s mostly positive, which we need more of, but from a science news perspective there’s not much there.

    • @gazby
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      59 months ago

      Great context, thank you!

  • @weedazz
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    379 months ago

    We have tests, we have treatment, we have cultural awareness and more common preventative sex practices in at risk individuals, we have huge public health apparatus domestically and internationally to trace and track cases, we have drugs that keep HIV from turning into AIDS, we have drugs to “prep before you have sex” to prevent transmission. I think using the word AIDS and pandemic in the same sentence is a bit alarmist at this point. However I also think to say it’s “cured” is also a step too far. It is a deadly communicable disease that we have made exponential strides in managing over the last 3 decades

  • @[email protected]
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    129 months ago

    Perfect case of Betteridge’s law of headlines. No, the AIDS pandemic is not ending. Almost nobody has access to this level of care and that will not change until we fix some other things (you can all see my home instance lol). But this is promising for our understanding of the virus and the human body as a whole, so it’s not sensationalism, just overly optimistic.

    • @captainlezbian
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      39 months ago

      Yeah the unfortunate reality is that the current status of aids is that it didn’t need to be a problem even despite not having a cure or vaccine. For proof look at the American gay community. We don’t really have much of an hiv problem outside of our poorest portions. Basically every slutty middle class gay man in America is on prep or knows to take pep if exposed. Condoms are widely used. Those with HIV often are able to prevent it from progressing to aids and to keep their viral loads below transmissible levels. And we’re on the verge of an HIV vaccine. Gonorrhea is a bigger problem.

      But in many countries the meds that keep this scourge under control are hard to access at best. My biggest hope here is that some health organization buys out the patent on this drug and goes full Jonas Salk with it. We needed it 40 years ago in America, but now here it’s nice to have for most. In Africa it’s desperately needed precisely because of the reasons it won’t be accessible. Hiv needs the smallpox treatment.

    • @captainlezbian
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      59 months ago

      Ah yes we’re back to “aids is God’s wrath and you deserve it.” Nobody deserves it, not the slutty man wasting away from the disease he just assumed he’d get, not the trans prostitute who had no other means to support herself in a society that refused to see someone like her as suitable for a boring desk job, not the heroin addict who rolled the dice when needles were scarce, and more than anything not the child who’s molestation came with a death sentence if untreated.

      The stories of aids are brutal even amongst those who could’ve prevented it. I would never call a god that punishes love and lust between consenting adults like that good.

      More American men died in the aids epidemic than the Vietnam war. Lifestyles that can expose one to HIV extend beyond gay sex and drug addiction but also include being a first responder or medical professional.

  • Sibbo
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    29 months ago

    It would be nice to get some primer on the article, since I don’t have time to read this all. But this is great news! I hope that whatever method they are using scales, and also generalises to all AIDS patients, with whatever variants they are having.

    • Dremor
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      309 months ago

      If you are not ironic, considering the number of patients and it being present on all continents, yes it is, by definition.

      • u/lukmly013 (lemmy.sdf.org)
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        29 months ago

        Why is it a 0 second video instead of image?

        Anyway, about the < 5:
        During pregnancy, HIV can pass through the placenta and infect the fetus.

        During labor and delivery, the baby may be exposed to the virus from a woman’s blood and other fluids. When a woman goes into labor, the amniotic sac breaks (her water breaks). Once this occurs, the risk of transmitting HIV to the baby increases. Most babies who get HIV become infected around the time of delivery.

        Breastfeeding also can transmit the virus to the baby.

        Source

        • @[email protected]
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          39 months ago

          I initially uploaded a gif, it looks like that breaks things, especially in jerboa. I replaced it with a different graph to the same effect.

    • @talab
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      9 months ago

      Is that you, Reagan?