• @thirdBreakfast
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    English
    116 months ago

    It has a practical element (Hello Jellyfin, Kavita, AudioBookshelf & Syncthing), but for the rest of it, it’s about 60% hobby and 20% learning stuff that could be potentially career enhancing.

    Gnu/Linux absolutely annihilating server operating systems means that I can run the same stack, and use the same tools, that giant companies are based on. All for free. In my spare room. 1L x86 computers cost less than two packs of cigarettes! Little SSD’s are ridiculously cheap. And you don’t even need that stuff - that old laptop in your cupboard will do. Even if you kick in to donate for your software (and I recommend you do if you can) it’s a cheap hobby compared to golf or skating or whatever. Anything you need to learn there’s blog posts and videos available.

    We live in an amazing time in this hobby. I know there’s companies that would like to take it away from us, but Open Source just keeps kicking goals. Thank you FOSS developers, Gnu, Linus, FSM, Cthulhu and the other forces in the universe that make this possible.

  • TransporterAccident1
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    fedilink
    86 months ago

    As someone who doesn’t work in tech, I mainly homelab as a way to learn about different technologies for fun. But I also like that I can invest in and control my own data, and don’t have to risk that my data will be inaccessible because a company goes under or changes their business model.

  • @[email protected]
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    fedilink
    16 months ago

    Few reasons. One, to help me advance in my career. Two, because I like the idea of open source. Three, tech business are kind of acting evil for money, so I’m going back to being self reliant and piracy.

  • @bitrate
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    16 months ago

    I do it because I like having full control over my data and services. Nobody can take it away from me or change the terms in which its provided.