Traditionally, retiring entails leaving the workforce permanently. However, experts found that the very definition of retirement is also changing between generations.

About 41% of Gen Z and 44% of millennials — those who are currently between 27 and 42 years old — are significantly more likely to want to do some form of paid work during retirement.

This increasing preference for a lifelong income, could perhaps make the act of “retiring” obsolete.

Although younger workers don’t intend to stop working, there is still an effort to beef up their retirement savings.

It’s ok! Don’t ever retire! Just work until you die, preferably not at work, where we’d have to deal with the removal of your corpse.

  • Cosmic Cleric
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    17 months ago

    Also, constructive eviction

    Constructive? Elaborate?

    this is a felony and you lose all rights to own housing property other than your own home ever again.

    I think that’s a step too far, and wouldn’t(?) pass muster, legally.

    A felony would come with high penalty fees to pay, and could be enough of a deterrent.

    • @[email protected]
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      17 months ago

      If you’re unfamiliar with the concept of constructive dismissal, it’s where an employer skirts termination laws by doing shit like booking the employee on all the worst hours or piling on tasks or moving their office space to somewhere far away or unpleasant to make work so unbearable that they quit. In parts of Canada that’s illegal and you’re required to pay out as if you’d fired them anyways if it’s shown you did that.

      Constructive eviction would be the same idea, not forcing an eviction before date because they want to spike the rent, but instead scheduling a shitton of construction and maintenance and other shit that make the place unlivable until the tenant eventually has to break the lease to be able to find anywhere else to get a consistent night’s sleep.

      Landlords were pulling it all over the dang place during the COVID eviction holds.

      Also, not being able to own or manage housing property other than your personal residence seems like a perfectly apt punishment for someone who’s demonstrated quite blatantly that they’re the worst kind of scumlord to trust with people’s housing rights.

      • Cosmic Cleric
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        17 months ago

        If you’re unfamiliar with the concept of constructive dismissal, it’s where an employer skirts termination laws

        Thank you for the education. I had not heard of that tactic described using that term before.

        Also, not being able to own or manage housing property other than your personal residence

        IANAL, but that seems to cross a legal ‘free will’ line that most people wouldn’t want to cross.

        Other forms of punishment without losing ownership would be the more established go to alternative.