• @dual_sport_dork
    link
    English
    3187 months ago

    I get it, but speaking as someone who used to design kitchen layouts for a living: Don’t put your sink in the corner. Just don’t.

    Also, this has one major “feature” above and beyond the usual diagonal sink in a corner cabinet, in that you can swivel the faucet into the middle position and dispense water directly onto your floor. Genius!

    • teft
      link
      fedilink
      English
      1017 months ago

      swivel the faucet into the middle position and dispense water directly onto your floor

      Or directly into a bucket.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        English
        537 months ago

        How often I’m filling buckets vs. how often I’d accidentally spill water on the floor.

        Would be a bad idea for me

        • Instigate
          link
          fedilink
          English
          117 months ago

          I’m pretty sure you’d get used to it after the first few times it happens. We accommodate to the limitations of many technologies on a nearly constant basis, often without consciously making those adjustments.

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            English
            197 months ago

            I’m pretty sure you’d get used to it after the first few times it happens

            You underestimated my ability to not learn from mistakes.

        • @dual_sport_dork
          link
          English
          117 months ago

          Ah. I see you found the “accessories” appendix of the KraftMaid catalog.

      • @scarabic
        link
        English
        17 months ago

        That’d be awesome for me. I’m always giving my kids hot baths in a little tub out in the backyard. They love it but I have to haul the water out there.

    • @samus12345
      link
      English
      39
      edit-2
      7 months ago

      There are two things you never put in a corner: sinks and Baby.

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      English
      157 months ago

      If you have a faucet can swivel, you could probably always put it somewhere to spill directly on the countertop. Still ugly design, though.

      • @Buddahriffic
        link
        English
        77 months ago

        Just get a faucet with a hose. Helps with cleaning/rinsing dishes, too, especially if it has a good high pressure setting.

        • @[email protected]
          link
          fedilink
          English
          37 months ago

          I was joking… Although maybe some people took it seriously.

          I mean I guess in case of emergency as in I do not want to go to the store for a hose just for this one time thing…

    • @MotoAsh
      link
      English
      97 months ago

      Doesn’t the faucet travel over the corners so it wouldn’t spill on the floor (much anyways) without pulling the faucet out?

      • @dual_sport_dork
        link
        English
        47 months ago

        No. Look at it in the picture. The gooseneck in it comes forward quite long enough to at the very least hit the countertop in the middle of the corner, and most of that water will either spill onto the floor if it doesn’t hit it directly.

        • Instigate
          link
          fedilink
          English
          67 months ago

          The same gooseneck can spray outside the confines of the sinks away from the bench edge as well. There’s around 180° of movement the tap can make behind the sinks that would cause water to not fall into the sink as well. There are many wrong ways to use taps in regular sinks as well; I think spilling water between the sinks would be a self-correcting issue after the first few times it happens.

    • @AA5B
      link
      English
      87 months ago

      My ex has the regular sink diagonally in the corner- and she’s too short. It has to be farther back from the edge of the counter to miss the corner. However she’s 5’2” (and overweight) so it’s harder to reach, enough to be an annoyance every time she washes dishes.

      Just don’t put your sink in the corner. There is no good solution

      • @littlewonder
        link
        English
        3
        edit-2
        7 months ago

        So what I’m hearing is that the corner sink causes divorces.

    • @scarabic
      link
      English
      67 months ago

      Yeah this seems like something you would do if the space didn’t permit anything else. Which is the case sometimes. But it’s not something to elect when you have other options.

    • wootz
      link
      English
      37 months ago

      Ok, I’m super curious. By “In the corner” do you mean putting a sink on the actual corner unit? Or by the tablespace immediately next to it?

      In the case of the first one I totally get it. The corner unit is a cursed part of the kitchen anyway. If you mean immediately next to it, why not? Not disagreeing, just curious what a professional says.

      • @dual_sport_dork
        link
        English
        227 months ago

        There are a couple of ways people do this.

        The “correct” way, or most correct way I guess, is to have a cabinet in the corner that is diagonal, at 45 degrees relative to the left and right cabinet runs. Example:

        You can buy premade angle cabinets that are designed for this, or you can just set a normal sink base cabinet at 45 degrees and mess around with fillers and so forth to space it out from the other two runs and hopefully ensure that there is sufficient clearance to open the doors and drawers on both it and the cabinets left and right of it. The disadvantage of this is it limits you to a surprisingly narrow sink, since it can’t be much if any wider than the face of the cabinet. And if you make the cabinet wider, you also have to bring it out into the room more and more as well, encroaching on your floor space. Normally people want to use a corner sink because they’re short on square footage anyway, so this is not ideal. Also, you inevitably wind up with a huge dead space behind the sink (that’s hard to reach, because there’s a sink and faucet in the way) and the further you bring out the face of the sink base cabinet the worse this gets.

        The other way is to just have a dead or blind corner with a typical 90 degree transition in it, and just plonk the sink diagonally in the dead space. Example:

        (This isn’t actually quite that as installed in a kitchen, but my low effort Google search did not turn up a great picture of this.) This has all the width limitation problems as the strategy above, but also forces you to stand in this stupid pie-wedge space with a hard corner in it, with the countertop edge digging into and the cabinet knobs hooking your belt loops all the time. It’s super annoying. In order to get a decently sized sink in here people often wind up pushing it back, and you’ll learn quickly that working in a sink that’s super far away is also really fuckin’ annoying.

        Plan C which is now becoming popular is what OP posted, a double sink that’s got the 90 degree corner built into it. This is the worst of both worlds, if you ask me, because you still have to stand in a pie wedge plus the sink(s) you get are super narrow, and your functional setup becomes fraught with additional peril because idiots and/or children can activate the faucet with it aimed at neither sink, soaking your countertop, cabinets, and floor.

        • wootz
          link
          English
          47 months ago

          Wow, thanks for the reply!

          That makes a lot of sense. I was trying to work out why a sink immediately next to a corner was bad, but now I know what you mean.

          I guess it’s a bad solution to trying to work around the problem of kitchen real estate, the same way trying to use for cabinet in the corner unit for anything is almost always a bad time.

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            English
            57 months ago

            The main reason it’s a bad idea is that 99% of the time the corner is where the seam is for the laminate skin, which is the weakest point in the counter and most likely to form gaps in the counter that water can get into and start to rot the plywood below. If you have granite I guess it would be less of a concern but I’m not familiar with the layout of those counters.

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      English
      27 months ago

      That does tend to happen. Even without swiveling the faucet, moving dishes between basins causes a bit of a puddle to develop. Thankfully I have a tiled floor so it doesn’t matter too much.

    • kase
      link
      English
      17 months ago

      Perfect for when you need to mop the kitchen floor-- no bucket required /j

    • @xkforce
      link
      English
      -107 months ago

      deleted by creator

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        English
        47 months ago

        Go back to your basement since you obviously have never done any chores that include using the kitchen sink

        • @xkforce
          link
          English
          17 months ago

          deleted by creator

      • @mriormro
        link
        English
        3
        edit-2
        7 months ago

        No, it’s a poor application implementation of a design not intended for that application.

        • @xkforce
          link
          English
          -2
          edit-2
          7 months ago

          deleted by creator

          • @mriormro
            link
            English
            27 months ago

            If someone is forced to use a tool in a manner that it wasn’t designed to be used in and a mistake happens, that’s neither the designer’s or user’s direct fault; it is the implementor’s fault.

            You can be as careful and attentive as you can muster but that doesn’t change the fact that contrary design solutions were implemented and have rendered the use of the tool (the sink) both non-ergonomic and unintuitive. This will lead to accidents.

      • @dual_sport_dork
        link
        English
        27 months ago

        Words typed by someone who has never had to manage a child or teenager.