Hey!

Currently doing drywall myself and I am using 6x6 cm squared timber around my outside walls.

The problem is they aren’t as stable as the other walls inside the house because of the 6x6 cm squared timbers that are about 30cm distance from each other.

I will screw my plasterboards on the squared timber and only one plasterboard, not two.

I have two pictures of what my construction looks like from far and one from close.

Maybe someone can give me advice before I install the plasterboard onto it.

The only problem I currently see is finding the subconstruction once I put the plasterboards back on. But other than that, if I find them can I install the cabinets safely?

  • @[email protected]
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    3 months ago

    Holy shit, is that load bearing plywood on the far wall (with the rectangle window).

    My friend, you need help from someone that knows what they are doing and familiar with local codes before proceeding any further.

    • @Pipoca
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      43 months ago

      That wall isn’t structural. There’s a much thicker wall behind it; this is just a thin internal layer for running electric and mounting drywall.

      • @[email protected]
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        13 months ago

        https://i.imgur.com/AbsJjCh.jpeg

        My concern is that those big beams (blue) end where they meet the plywood (yellow). Which means they are transferring their downward force into the board(s) highlighted in green. That in turn presses down on the vertical studs highlighted in red. These aren’t connected to anything on the bottom. So the weight from the beams gets supported by the screws attaching all these pieces to the plywood wall? Maybe if they’re just for looks and not structural support. Maybe that’s how it’s done in germany.

        • roguetrick
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          3 months ago

          Behind the green board, behind the OSB, there is a very thick top plate that those beams are sitting on and based on what the OP said to me, that is then framed down to a sill plate also behind the OSB. Nothing on the outside of the OSB is structural and he’s actually screwing those 6x6 cm boards into what’s behind the OSB. They’re using the OSB as a vapor barrier instead of faced insulation like we do and also protecting the studs with that vapor barrier from the interior of the house.

          Edit: Truth is, what’s funny about OP’s wall and the response it’s getting is that it’s better constructed than most American buildings you could find. We don’t tend to put as big a gap between the vapor barrier and the interior heated space and we don’t tend to include the studs as protected by that vapor barrier. When we do we use plastic sheeting, not OSB, because that’s too expensive. I’d imagine the R value on his insulation is also much higher than ours.

    • @Death_Equity
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      43 months ago

      They are not American, Germans build way different so how they do things does not make sense without understanding what is going on.

      • @GrogonOP
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        13 months ago

        I think people don’ know that the “studs” what I didn’t know were are hidden behind the Plywood.

        • roguetrick
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          3 months ago

          Yeah, folks are having a hard time wrapping their head around how it structurally works but it obviously does since they’re building housing developments with it. The picture just shows the sill plate and top plate (the two thick pieces of wood on the top and bottom of the wall behind the OSB[what we call the plywood on the inside]) with insulation sandwiched between, but there has to be lengths of wood going from those to hold them together (which we call studs). They’re mistakenly thinking that your 6x6 cm pieces of wood are those studs.

          • @GrogonOP
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            3 months ago

            So I guess I should be fine?

            I am having heart attack and panic right now.

            My construction dude told me to apply 6x6 cm squared timber for installation (electricity) and spread the about 30 cm apart from each other around the house. Once the electrician comes and installs everything and is finished I can install plasterboard onto the 6x6cm squared timber.

            I am just not sure if I can hang anything on the plasterboard that is attached to 6x6cm timber. It would be alot more stable if I could get rid of the 6x6cm timber and attach plasterboard to plywood (like the inside walls).

            At the end he said it’s for electricity only and my safety so I don’t break the vapor barrier later if I screw something into the plasterboard. So I have about 6 cm “air” before the “real” wall starts after the plywood.

            Its basically from inside to outside:

            Plasterboard -> 6x6 cm squared timber -> Plywood -> Studs -> Vapor Barrier -> Insulation (240mm wool) ->… in the end the totall wall is about 39cm thick.

            • roguetrick
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              3 months ago

              So are the 6x6s attaching just into the plywood or are they going into something behind the plywood? Overall it sounds fine what he told you to do, but what they’re attaching to and how you do what we call “blocking” to secure them is how you determine if you can hang cabinets.

              Edit: Per your additional information, what you’re doing is fine but I’d ask him specifically about where you want to hang cabinets because you’d need to make more consideration. They put a lot more strain than thin drywall to the fasteners that are holding them up.

              • @GrogonOP
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                23 months ago

                I have bigger screws in those that go into a bigger piece of wood behind the plywall.

                I guess it’s the studs then. So my 6x6 cm squared timber that I am installing vertically is going into studs behind the plywall

                • roguetrick
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                  13 months ago

                  Yeah, that’s essentially fine. You likely can hang cabinets off of them, but I’m not a cabinet installer or a framer. I’m a nurse that used to sell building supplies. You should ask him if you need more reinforcement for your cabinets. For your drywall everything’s fine.

                  • @GrogonOP
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                    23 months ago

                    Alright cool.

                    Yeah well I am just a nurse too (but in germany) or else I’d not have to ask here lol.

                    I sent a picture of the subconstruction to the kitchen company and they will tell me more.

      • @[email protected]
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        13 months ago

        Not just germans, aussie here, assumed that was internal walls (which differ from external). Seen a few double brick/ concrete framed out like that

        Mind you our building standards have gone down the shitter since the 90’s…

    • roguetrick
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      33 months ago

      All of the OSB is the inside of the already constructed wall. It’s interior fascia, essentially, with insulation behind it.