• @loo
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    503 months ago

    Most people don’t know what they’re installing or don’t care about their privacy, which is why there’s not enough people rising up against kernel level AC’s. Also, not being able to play until you create an account is much more upsetting to most people, than just clicking ‘update’ in League of Legends.

    • @barsquid
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      73 months ago

      Does the rootkit install alongside the game like without explicit user action? That’s pretty unfortunate.

      • @loo
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        223 months ago

        There’s a tooltip next to the update button that says something like ‘Our Anticheat Vanguard is out now!’ or smth like that. The rest is exactly the same as any other update

        • @barsquid
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          63 months ago

          That is despicable TBH.

          • @[email protected]
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            143 months ago

            Keep in mind this is purchasing a Sony product after they already showed us who they were with the first rootkit scandal.

            • @[email protected]
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              173 months ago

              For the kids:

              The Sony BMG CD copy protection rootkit scandal was a scandal focused on the implementation of copy protection measures on about 22 million CDs distributed by Sony BMG in 2005. When inserted into a computer, the CDs installed one of two pieces of software that provided a form of digital rights management (DRM) by modifying the operating system to interfere with CD copying. Neither program could easily be uninstalled, and they created vulnerabilities that were exploited by unrelated malware. One of the programs would install and “phone home” with reports on the user’s private listening habits, even if the user refused its end-user license agreement (EULA), while the other was not mentioned in the EULA at all. Both programs contained code from several pieces of copylefted free software in an apparent infringement of copyright, and configured the operating system to hide the software’s existence, leading to both programs being classified as rootkits.