What are the positives and the negatives?

  • @[email protected]
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    341 month ago

    In a car, no not really, that is going to make everything in your life a lot harder and less comfortable. I feel like a car would be a last resort, I have no other options, kind of thing.

    I lived in a van for just over 2 years though and honestly I miss it. I don’t just miss the extra money I had from not paying rent but I also miss being able to stay where ever I wanted and waking up next to the beach or in a forest.

  • @[email protected]
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    291 month ago

    No. I’ve done it, and it is dangerous, uncomfortable, unhealthy, and often unsanitary. Plus it is illegal most places.

    Beats the shit out of a shelter or the street though.

    • @Delphia
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      181 month ago

      I had a friend who did it for 2 years, he rented a storage unit that was big enough for his car after a few sketchy nights. Put the car in and pull the door down, set up the cot, unroll the sleeping bag and settle in for the night. It had the added advantage of not having to keep all his stuff in the car at all times so he could maintain some semblance of a normal appearing life.

      We had no idea he was doing it.

  • Nemo Wuming
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    231 month ago

    Going to the bathroom in the middle of the night sounds like a negative

  • @[email protected]
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    221 month ago

    I would do it if it were legal.

    As a libertarian who tends to get along really well with socialists, it boils my blood that living in one’s car is illegal. There is absolutely no reason reason for that law other than “fuck poor people”.

    • @Cyclist
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      31 month ago

      Poor people are an inconvenience. They often don’t produce anything of value, and they aren’t consumers on a large enough scale to be worthwhile. So they should be banned.

      I’m sure some 1% type has said this at sometime.

  • kora
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    201 month ago

    I live in my car rn, and have been for over 300 days. And not because I wanted to.

    AMA

    • @return2ozmaOP
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      71 month ago

      What’s your day to day like? Pros? Cons? What’s something you didn’t realize until you were living in your car?

      • kora
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        1 month ago

        Its better than being on the streets or back in texas with all the transphobia there. I hate not having a bathroom that’s mine, and I really hate all the eco-sinks every bathroom has.

        Since living in my car, my sense of white guilt has skyrocketed. I have so many interactions with police because they just wanna check on me, but I haven’t had a single “bad” experience yet and I know thats because I’m white.

        Its not going to be forever, but it was the best way to start living as my true self and despite all the struggles I don’t think I’d do it any differently.

        If you are in a position to do so, I have more of my story on my gofundme that I recently set up.

        • @[email protected]
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          41 month ago

          Just as an aside, I’ve really only had 1 negative experience with a cop and have met many great cops as of late. I’m a Texan, and I’m definitely not white. I wanted to mention this because even though police forces as institutions have huge issues, the people in them are just as varied as everybody else. I doubt it’s just your race - your area probably has plenty of good apples.

          Anyway, I hope stuff gets better! Hopefully you’ll get the treatment(s) you need and can find a stable living situation soon.

          • kora
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            31 month ago

            I’m sure. I am in the twin cities though, so its pretty verified that they aren’t awesome here.

            Thanks! You should leave texas, its slowly chewing its own foot off.

              • kora
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                21 month ago

                Maybe, but it just isn’t safe for women or us gays/trans, especially when it comes to healthcare.

                • @[email protected]
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                  21 month ago

                  More of a reason for me to stay and vote. I don’t plan on having children soon, and me leaving the state won’t make it any better for other Texans who can’t leave even if they need to.

                  Regardless, even if I can’t make the state better for women or LGBT+ people, there’s always a different group I can make it better for.

  • @[email protected]
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    161 month ago

    Nope. I don’t have a car and consider it a money pit in the first place. A car costs a driving license. It also costs insurance. And fuel to move it. And it will break down at some point. Plus, winters are pretty brutal where I live and heating this thing/myself would be a nightmare. To me, a car is an anchor; a heavy ball attached to your foot.

    If I had a car, and it was for a few weeks in summer, I may consider it. But I prefer have a proper place instead, and save money by not having a car.

      • @[email protected]
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        111 month ago

        But I don’t need a car to go anywhere in my daily life. My bike can bring me where I need to, it doesn’t cost gas, and doesn’t require yearly fees for a license. Public transit for the rest. Groceries are hauled with a bike trailer or I make multiple trips on foot.

        Seriously, I prefer to live with 3 roommates close to work, and have access to a toilet, shower kitchen… rather than pay for a car and gas to “live in it” and get to work.

        If you have a car and drive, you may see it as some sort of tool, and have some value and utility over an apartment, but for people that already live without a car, they often just seem like a burden.

        I don’t want to have a 1.5 ton block of metal and need to pay gas to move it. I can move by other means.

  • Dr. Wesker
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    161 month ago

    I lived in a small travel trailer for a year. That was bearable, because it had the semblance of a small domicile. It also has the benefit of blending in, if parked in areas where you’re assumed to be camping or just passing through. At the end of that year, I was definitely over it, though.

    When I imagine living in a car for the same amount of time, I can only think of negatives.

  • @Sterile_Technique
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    121 month ago

    Car, no. Camping trailer… only thing holding me back is convincing the wife.

  • @Moghul
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    81 month ago

    Absolutely not. There are no upsides to it that would outweigh the negatives, and I have other options long before getting to that point.

  • @DillyDaily
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    61 month ago

    I would already be living in a vehicle, but I can’t drive (low vision) so it’s never going to be an option for me.

    About 10 years ago I was looking into bike towed campers as a security plan for an unstable housing situation, only to learn they are illegal to tow in my country. You can own one, sleep in one, and tow it on private property, but to move it from one property to another legally I’d need to pay someone with a car to put it in a car trailer, then unload my camper at the destination.

  • HobbitFoot
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    61 month ago

    I’d only consider it if it was tied to a nomadic lifestyle. At that point, you’re no longer tethered to a static location, so why not travel?

    I imagine my van would likely be something like on Cheap RV Living: https://youtube.com/@CheapRVliving

    He shows a lot of different set-ups, from elaborate to basic.

  • @Paragone
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    61 month ago

    Without a legal mailing-address, you will be blocked from participating in much of the online-economy.

    “no shipping address?” XOR “we won’t ever ship to rural people, P.O. boxes, or any other non-CITY bullshit.”

    There’s a book which discusses this, named “The Addres Book”, by Deirdre Mask.

    Some jurisdictions may require you to be treated as a valid citizen, even with a P.O. box “address”, but I don’t know of any jurisdiction that does that.

    No address?

    Your life will be stomped, & from what I’ve seen, you get deemed a vagrant/homeless by enforcement, too.

    • @[email protected]
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      51 month ago

      In the US you can get around this by renting a PO Box and using the post office street address + your box number as the “Unit” number. There’s a form you have to sign to give them permission to handle third party packages for you but I don’t think it costs anything extra.

    • @Delphia
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      41 month ago

      You can kind of get around this in my country by putting in a long term mail redirection at the post office. You can just keep updating your drivers licence and other paperwork at the old address. Its only a matter of time till it gets found out but it will probably work for a fairly long time.