• Flying SquidM
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    2 months ago

    It’s been this way for a long time. SEK Studio, North Korea’s production company, worked on The Simpsons Movie, Futurama and Avatar: The Last Airbender. (They did not work on Disney films, that’s just a rumor.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEK_Studio

        • @WindyRebel
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          62 months ago

          Bear is driving! How can that be?!

          I loved the Clerks cartoon and I still quote this all the time. All in the name of Sexy Randal the Pharaoh Wizard!

          • @jordanlundM
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            22 months ago

            “Nobody called you that…”

            “That one guy did!”

            That was the most deeply hilarious and fucked up thing I’ve seen.

            “Play ball!”

  • @[email protected]
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    282 months ago

    The revelation comes from a trove of documents recently discovered by US researchers inside a computer server housed in North Korea.

    New double speak word drop.

    • @[email protected]
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      42 months ago

      Oh, don’t worry, I’m just researching how to topple capitalism.

      I kinda like it. Science!

  • @[email protected]
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    222 months ago

    If they’d consider not being such unfriendly shitbirds they could actually properly participate with the rest of the world.

    But, like many people, they’re afraid of change, I guess.

    • @[email protected]
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      122 months ago

      They talk a big game but they aren’t actually that unfriendly in practice. They haven’t funded terrorist organizations or tried to engineer coups in other countries, mostly because they don’t have the money or power to but still there are way worse actors on the world stage that the world happily deals with. Just look at Israel which has almost no international sanctions, and Russia with only about a quarter of the world doing some half assed sanctions for a blatant war of aggression.

      They’re the hermit kingdom and the leadership is mostly concerned with the brutal subjugation of there own citizens and not international affairs.

      They have been making nukes but that’s more of a defensive response to the loaded gun the u.s. has been pointing at them since there inception rather than some crazy plot to carry out a suicidal offensive nuclear assault on the u.s. or the south.

        • @[email protected]
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          92 months ago

          The north did invade but this wasn’t some evil communist dictator attacking an innocent southern democracy. Both sides at the time the war broke out were repressive dictatorships who understood that unification was going to take violence, the north made the first big move but there had been skirmishes prompted by both sides leading up to it. If the south had their military ready Rhee would not have hesitated to invade first if he thought he could win.

          After the initial success of the north the U.S. rescued the south and even after recapturing the south continued on to invade the north and carry out a brutal, near genocidal, bombing campaign of the north destroying up to 85% of buildings. Like Israel and Hamas the north did strike “first” but the south and the u.s. hit back disproportionately harder. It is with the memory of that atrocity that the north despises the u.s. and seeks any means of protection against it happening again. They aren’t dumb, they know they stand no chance of winning an offensive war while the u.s. is on the peninsula and have given up on doing so, now they’re just trying to survive.

          None of this is to excuse the kim government for there many domestic atrocities, while the South has opened up since the war the north has remained one of, if not the most , repressive and abusive states out there. Just saying there foreign policy isn’t as crazy and aggressive as the west likes to make them out to be.

          • @[email protected]
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            42 months ago

            Man it’s refreshing to see people include more context than the usual good vs. bad, clear cut superhero nonsense that dominates the mainstream narrative. Thank you!

      • @Seleni
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        52 months ago

        See, kids, this is what happens when you sleep through history class.

        • @[email protected]
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          82 months ago

          I think I paid attention pretty well in my senior seminar on the Korean war but if you want I can link you my final paper on it if you want to make sure.

          Assuming you have the American high school understanding of the war where the evil north invaded the free south and the benevolent u.s. came to the rescue, I’d recommend you read Bruce Cummings book on the subject to give some insight into what really happened. If you want a more condensed version refer to the comment I gave for the other guy.

  • @natarey
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    212 months ago

    “Unknowingly”

  • @AllonzeeLV
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    2 months ago

    I’m sure their private shareholders are absolutely thrilled with slave labor making them a few extra cents per share.

    It’s insane what we allow people to do to people in the name of “just business” profiteering.

    CEOs of the offenders at the time, and anyone who signed off on this, should go to prison. Instead, at most (and likely nothing at all), their companies will receive a fine far less than what they saved using slave labor, which means they’ll keep doing similar things.

  • @[email protected]
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    142 months ago

    Difficult to manage their supply chains? This means look the other way.

    If they really wanted to, they could very easily avoid north Korean outsourcing. I have never accidentally outsourced to north Korea.

    Check the contracts as part of the investigation. If there was no requirement to keep confidentiality or prevent the use ofnslave labor, its willful. If there was and there were nonchecks, its effectively the same thing.

    Fine the company double the total amount they paid to outsource at a minimum. It would be interesting if we had fines based on total revenue. As an original for amazon, that’s a huge chunk of change. Of course, the company would be legally distant from the main ownership, but one can dream.

    • @[email protected]
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      132 months ago

      I think the actual cause of this is outsourcing to China where you have no transparency as to who actually does the work. It’s nearly impossible to outsource to NK from inside the USA, but it’s pretty trivial to do it inside China.

      My guess is that the work got outsourced twice with one Chinese middeman company keeping the difference.

      • @[email protected]
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        32 months ago

        Oh, I don’t doubt that. However the fact that presumable neither of us work in outsourcing and can deduce that makes it seem willful ignorance.

  • AutoTL;DRB
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    52 months ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    It’s unclear how the files ended up in this tightly controlled portion of the internet, but the researchers who analyzed them told CNN they appear to be the result of work that was unknowingly outsourced to North Korean workers.

    Roy found a new North Korean website that outside visitors didn’t need a password to access, unlocking a trove of animation sketches, and shared them with the Stimson Center, a Washington-based think tank.

    The discovery raises questions about the ability of US tech and creative arts companies to control their supply chains and avoid work that could inadvertently violate sanctions banning countries from doing business with North Korea.

    “Seemingly fueled by the desire for unreasonably low-cost labor, foreign media companies continue to subcontract animation work to SEK Studio,” the Treasury Department said in a statement announcing the sanctions.

    Battered by sanctions and strapped for cash, the North Korean regime has turned to thousands of IT workers living abroad to bring in hard currency, according to US officials and private experts.

    “Treasury remains concerned about North Korean efforts to generate revenue for their weapons programs, including through cybercrime and the abuse of contractors, and urges industry to be vigilant against any attempts to evade sanctions,” the spokesperson said in a statement.


    The original article contains 1,576 words, the summary contains 202 words. Saved 87%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!