• @[email protected]
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    596 days ago

    don’t forget the second part where i quit something i’m good at because i don’t immediately see exponential growth which means my current abilities are a mere fluke

  • @[email protected]
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    476 days ago

    I like the old line, “If at first you don’t succeed, try again, and again…Then give up. There’s no point in making a fool of yourself.”

    • @HonoraryMancunian
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      56 days ago

      I’m sure this was used in a beer advert in the UK in the 90s or early 00s

        • @jaybone
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          46 days ago

          My grandmother told me this when I kept falling off my dinosaur.

  • @[email protected]
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    316 days ago

    I don’t mean this in a bad or critical way: I genuinely do not understand this thought. As humans we are born shit at EVERYTHING. Literally. We can’t even fucking walk.

    In the developed world we spend the first 16-18yrs learning. And then some of us spend some more time learning.

    I learned a new sport when I joined uni. Then I learned to programme. Then I learned a martial art.

    I have spent my entire life being shit at things. Because I’ve also spent my entire life learning.

    If you refuse to be shit at something, then you also refuse to learn, and to me that makes no sense - I think I’ll only stop learning when I die.

    This is just my unfiltered thoughts - I am not trying to be critical, I am just trying to explain how I cannot comprehend this kind of thinking because it is the literal antithesis of me.

    • @edgemaster72
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      376 days ago

      I’m not saying this to brag, because I’m absolutely fucked like the person in the picture says, but “learning” in school was piss easy, pretty much only required being there. For me there really wasn’t a “being shit” period, at least that was noticeable to me. Then I got to college and I don’t know if it was the change in how classes were structured and scheduled, or that natural aptitude had taken me as far as it could, or both, but I didn’t know how to cope with the effort it required, because I never had to develop that skill prior to that. Frankly, I still haven’t. So yeah, I totally get this post.

      • @RGB3x3
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        116 days ago

        Same here for me. Learning in school never took any effort at all. I was always good enough with little practice that I didn’t push myself to do more.

        College is the great equalizer that shows people they’re not as gifted as they thought.

        • @[email protected]
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          56 days ago

          Ironically I found school easily 10x harder than anything at university, bachelors and masters level included.

          • @[email protected]
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            66 days ago

            I think thats just how it works. If you found school harder then you probably developed some skill or habit knowingly or otherwise, but if you found it easy then you just never did put in effort to develop such skill. Of course this does not apply to all.

      • @[email protected]
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        35 days ago

        I found school really difficult as an adolescent. I struggled at everything and nothing made sense. But it did prepare me for the working world.

        Some people are just good at learning, at school. Like I would show up to every class, every lab, take notes paraphrased by hand, rewrite them out again on my own, ask questions after class, make flash cards… Then I have this distinct memory of drilling a classmate who had missed a bunch of classes and were in a bad way, and… They got a much better score than me. Some people make it look so easy… I wish.

        Anyway, that’s all to say not everyone has your gifts. I’m also a programmer which is thankfully lucrative, so it was worth it. But it’s never been easy for me, or I imagine many other people.

    • cheesepotatoes
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      6 days ago

      am just trying to explain how I cannot comprehend this kind of thinking because it is the literal antithesis of me.

      Just grow up with awful parents that verbally, emotionally and physically abuse you any time you do anything new and aren’t immediately excellent at it. You start having panic attacks any time you have to try something new until you just start avoiding new things altogether, just to save yourself the trauma.

      Ez.

    • The Picard ManeuverOP
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      6 days ago

      Tenacity is a crucial skill to develop, and not everybody figures that out.

      Children are great at it, because they’re constantly learning to do everything and are expected to be beginners, but at a certain point for many adults, failing at something new challenges their self-image/self-worth, so they just find reasons to avoid developing skills altogether.

      Learning how to fail is a necessary step on the way to mastering anything.

      • @[email protected]
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        86 days ago

        Children are often shit at it, and have full on screaming meltdowns several times in a few minutes when something doesn’t go immediately their way

        Otoh little bastards don’t have a choice so they gotta suck it up

    • @[email protected]
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      106 days ago

      In the wise words of Jake the Dog: “suckin’ at something is the first step to bein’ sorta good at something”

  • @[email protected]
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    206 days ago

    My 10 year old son is like that. It’s been a chore teaching him otherwise and explaining that some skills could take years.

    • @dohpaz42
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      256 days ago

      It’s tricky for sure. For my kids, I try to take any and all wins (no matter the size) and emphasize how it took hard work and practice for them to succeed. I also remind them that even in failure they can learn something for next time. Hopefully it’ll set the right attitude for them. Good luck!

      • @Schal330
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        126 days ago

        Something helpful someone said to me is that if someone says something like “I can’t do it”, simply say “yet” and it immediately changes their point of view.

      • @[email protected]
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        106 days ago

        Thanks for that. He seems to get frustrated around not being able to just solve all of his math problems right away. Like when I point out some mistakes he has in his homework (after he asks me to) he gets frustrated with that. Every time he does, I explain that it’s ok to make mistakes and it’s good to learn from them. He’s been getting better.

  • @Kyrgizion
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    126 days ago

    I’ve been consistently trying to write and draw for 15+ years, with weekly practices, and I haven’t seen any appreciable improvement. My handwriting is still erratic and illegible, and I can’t carry a story thread over a page or two without stumbling and falling hard. Meanwhile, both my grandfather and mother are accomplished artists. Guess it skipped a generation…

    • @[email protected]
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      136 days ago

      Do you enjoy doing it? If so, who cares if you’re good. If not, why are you doing something you don’t enjoy?

      • @Kyrgizion
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        86 days ago

        I don’t enjoy doing it, but I do it with the goal of showing myself I CAN do it and to gain joy/accomplishment for that, and also because these are some specific weak points of mine I’ve been trying to polish and repair for ages. Also, I’m always very impressed with people whose handwriting looks like it was printed because it’s so precise and consistent. Mine has always looked like I was a doctor (I wish), so I just wanted to improve in that regard.

    • @trashgirlfriend
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      24 days ago

      As the other person mentioned, maybe you should reconsider the way you organise your writing.

      If you cannot hold down plotlines while you’re just writing off the top of your head, you could try doing more planning and mapping out your plot.

      If you don’t mind the mess, and prefer physical/tactile notes, stuff like the post its the other user mentioned, or something like a cork board could probably be good.

      If you prefer to be super organised and don’t mind digital notes, there’s a lot of free to use organisation/notes apps, I really like Obsidian.

    • @Num10ck
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      56 days ago

      i once visited a friend who was in the middle of writing a screenplay and he had an entire 20 ft wall covered in colored post-it notes for various characters and story arcs. maybe that would help you.

      maybe thats a good use case for spatial applications.

  • @Gutek8134
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    66 days ago

    My way of quitting that was Dark Souls 3 (even though I apparently suck at it way more than I should) - Can’t beat that part? Get your arse back over there and stop complaining. You WILL succeed.

    • The Picard ManeuverOP
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      86 days ago

      The soulsborne games are a legitimately effective way to build tenacity.

  • @Mango
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    35 days ago

    I like to preach about practice. It’s corny sounding, but practice is everything. You gotta focus on the thing rather than how you feel about your progress with the thing.

  • Captain Aggravated
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    26 days ago

    I tend to be that way in the wood shop. I’ll try a technique, and if it doesn’t produce usable results I ditch it almost immediately and try something very different. LIke I have completely given up on cutting tenons on the table saw, that’s my router table’s job.

  • @randon31415
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    -56 days ago

    Why learn to program computers or make art over years of training when half way through AI can come and take your job prospects and make it so all that time was waisted? Something that you can learn quick you can do for a while before it becomes obsolete.