• originalucifer
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    211 month ago

    well lets hope its still viable. they sure as fuck cant wait for another boeing ship.

    • @PancakeTrebuchet
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      91 month ago

      In the event it was deemed too compromised, how long would it take to get an emergency Dragon capsule up there?

      • @[email protected]
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        71 month ago

        After this, the FAA should require Boeing to pay spacex to maintain a crew dragon rescue ready to launch at all times the starliner is on orbit.

      • Pennomi
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        51 month ago

        Honestly SpaceX probably has one on standby right now.

        • @mercano
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          61 month ago

          Maybe. There are only four Crew Dragons. One’s attached to the station right now, and one’s had its docking equipment removed in preparation for the spacewalk on the Polaris Dawn mission. That leaves two. I’m sure one’s already in prep for the next regularly scheduled crew rotation. A rescue mission would mean either leaving two of the astronauts scheduled to fly that flight on the ground to leave open seats for the Starliner crew, or a special mission using the last Dragon.

          • @[email protected]
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            11 month ago

            Depending on how the Starliner leaks progress, I might be fine with lying on the floor of a Cargo Dragon.

            • @mercano
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              51 month ago

              Originally they had planned on two more seats in the Crew Dragon behind / below the commander and pilot, but when they switched from a powered land landing to a parachute splashdown, they had to adjust the angles of the seats & the travel in the seat suspension. Those changes required them to drop the second row of seats.

              • @[email protected]
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                1 month ago

                Originally they had planned on two more seats

                I think the original design had three seats in the second row, for a total of seven.

  • @ohwhatfollyisman
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    111 month ago

    boy, those voice transmissions back to base informing of these leaks would be worth listening to.

  • Carighan Maconar
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    81 month ago

    I mean, to be fair, I’d like to know more about the volume lost here.

    For example people often struggle to imagine that the sun is losing 4.7 million tons every second. Or that ships constantly take on water they have to pump out. This is part of normal operation, and while the helium leaks here clearly are not, if built with a degree of redundancy in mind, certain loss rates are entirely acceptable.

    Or not.

    Depends on the volume involved. 😅

  • Beaver
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    81 month ago

    Boeing and redundancy are like oil and water

    • atocci
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      1 month ago

      To be fair, regarding redundancy:

      The astronauts only need seven hours of “free-flight time” to perform the end-of-mission maneuvers and Starliner currently has enough helium for 70 hours of free-flight time, Boeing said.

      • @[email protected]
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        131 month ago

        Boeing said

        Do we really trust them at this point? I mean, if true that’s great, but they’ve lied before.

        • atocci
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          1 month ago

          From a business point of view, I don’t think lying about this is in their best interest. If they lie to the FAA about their passenger planes, maybe they get an investigation and a fine. If they lie to NASA about the safety of Starliner, they lose their only customer for it.

        • Optional
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          11 month ago

          Trust? No.

          Hoping their greed results in safe conclusion to the mission.

  • NoIWontPickAName
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    81 month ago

    I wanted to come in here and say something about helium being so small that a small leak would be very easy to miss but 5?

    • Glimpythegoblin
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      61 month ago

      Not to mention that they make helium leak detectors. I’m not an expert but I built a helium tight 60000psi system a couple weeks ago first try. Granted it didn’t have to survive a trip on a rocket.

  • @[email protected]
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    51 month ago

    lol, I worked on a project at my company that sent a box with various instruments up to space sometime in February… but it’s waiting on something that’s on the Starliner before it can be unboxed and used, so now it’s just been sitting for 4 months and will continue to do so for god-knows-how-long