Me again. The guy with the NIC problem from before.

I installed the Rx590 and it shows up in lspci as an RTX 2070. I was hoping it was just Proxmox not having drivers or something, but when I pass it into the Hackintosh it’s meant for, it shows as NVIDIA there too:

Now I did get the Rx590 off eBay, but I’m it was listed as and looks like this: https://www.powercolor.com/product?id=1551768831

So I think it is actually a Rx590.

This is lspci. 01:00.0 is a RTX 3060. 03:00.0 is the Rx590.

00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Device a740 (rev 01)

00:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Device a70d (rev 01)

00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Raptor Lake-S GT1 [UHD Graphics 770] (rev 04)

00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 XHCI Controller (rev 11)

00:14.2 RAM memory: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH Shared SRAM (rev 11)

00:15.0 Serial bus controller: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH Serial IO I2C Controller #0 (rev 11)

00:16.0 Communication controller: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH HECI Controller #1 (rev 11)

00:17.0 SATA controller: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH SATA Controller [AHCI Mode] (rev 11)

00:1a.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH PCI Express Root Port #25 (rev 11)

00:1b.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Device 7ac4 (rev 11)

00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH PCI Express Root Port #2 (rev 11)

00:1c.4 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH PCI Express Root Port #5 (rev 11)

00:1d.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH PCI Express Root Port #9 (rev 11)

00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation Z690 Chipset LPC/eSPI Controller (rev 11)

00:1f.3 Audio device: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S HD Audio Controller (rev 11)

00:1f.4 SMBus: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH SMBus Controller (rev 11)

00:1f.5 Serial bus controller: Intel Corporation Alder Lake-S PCH SPI Controller (rev 11)

00:1f.6 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation Ethernet Connection (17) I219-V (rev 11)

01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation GA106 [GeForce RTX 3060] (rev a1)

01:00.1 Audio device: NVIDIA Corporation GA106 High Definition Audio Controller (rev a1)

02:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Sandisk Corp Western Digital WD Black SN850X NVMe SSD (rev 01)

03:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation TU106 [GeForce RTX 2070] (rev a1)

03:00.1 Audio device: NVIDIA Corporation TU106 High Definition Audio Controller (rev a1)

03:00.2 USB controller: NVIDIA Corporation TU106 USB 3.1 Host Controller (rev a1)

03:00.3 Serial bus controller: NVIDIA Corporation TU106 USB Type-C UCSI Controller (rev a1)

04:00.0 Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8125 2.5GbE Controller (rev 05)

05:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Micron/Crucial Technology Device 5415 (rev 01)

06:00.0 PCI bridge: PLX Technology, Inc. PEX 8724 24-Lane, 6-Port PCI Express Gen 3 (8 GT/s) Switch, 19 x 19mm FCBGA (rev ca)

07:00.0 PCI bridge: PLX Technology, Inc. PEX 8724 24-Lane, 6-Port PCI Express Gen 3 (8 GT/s) Switch, 19 x 19mm FCBGA (rev ca)

  • @nemaninOP
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    1 month ago

    Welp. Seems I’m an idiot. I’m very much a Unix noob so assumed it was something that Unix I didn’t understand rather than check the physical card again.

    I was definitely shipped an nvidia card, not the amd I bid on! So case opened with eBay!

    Sorry for the dumb question. Thanks for the great help.

    Stay tuned for my next dumb question. :)

    • folkrav
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      111 month ago

      If it wasn’t that it’s Nvidia and that you bought this specifically for Linux, I’d have told you to keep the Nvidia, as you did get a significantly better card for the price you paid.

        • folkrav
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          51 month ago

          Eh, I just generally avoid Nvidia on Linux hosts unless I specifically need it. Their driver situation is better than it was, but still sucks.

    • @ikidd
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      21 month ago

      It’s Linux, not Unix.

    • @[email protected]
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      11 month ago

      If you don’t want the card I wouldn’t be against buying it off you for a bit more than an rx590

  • Shadow
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    1 month ago

    Lspci doesn’t care about drivers. What’s lshw say?

    Sounds like maybe a fake card or something. Do you also have a 3060 in there?

    • @nemaninOP
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      1 month ago

      Yah. Trying to make an Uber server.

      Bunch of drives for a nas vm

      3060 for a bit of a gaming pc cam for things like moonlight.

      Rx590 is for a hackintosh vm to make local backups of my iCloud stuff.

      And a unix vm to manage docker containers.

      Also plan to put Plex in a LXC (I think that’s the term) on Proxmox so it can hardware decode using the igpu.

  • @[email protected]
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    71 month ago

    Old AMD cards can be flashed with any BIOS that says anything. Maybe the card was used for a scam and flashed to say it’s an RTX 2070, it should have a switch to go to its 2nd BIOS near the top left (when slotted in). And if it doesn’t, you can just get its original BIOS off of Techpowerup’s database and flash it with atiflash, also from Techpowerup.

    Picture stolen from some Reddit help thread for a red dragon RX 580.

    This is assuming that Linux is reading what the card claims it is correctly. Which seems likely, since reading device IDs is a really important feature that probably works nearly perfectly.

    • @TMP_NKcYUEoM7kXg4qYe
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      21 month ago

      Returning it is what OP should do. He paid for a working card, he should not be dealing with firmware flashing. Though I’d try using GPU-Z on a Windows machine to be sure first. Technically you can only be 100 % sure after reading the laser print from the GPU die but that might make returning harder so I wouldn’t bother.

  • @[email protected]
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    1 month ago

    Well, there’s the obvious answer, that you actually have an Nvidia card. I think I’d probably consider taking a look at the card and at photos of new cards of both models and see which it looks like.

    From a software standpoint, I have a hard time believing that you’re misdetecting the type of card.

    I don’t know anything about Proxmox, but I understand that it’s some sort of platform used to virtualize systems. It apparently, based on a quick search, has some kind of support for Nvidia passthrough, called vGPU. If you’re looking from inside a virtualized environment, is it possible that you’re looking at a virtual GPU? That seems like a long shot, since I assume that if your GPU is AMD, that a virtual Nvidia GPU would be non-functional – it doesn’t look like this vGPU thing can use a host AMD GPU-- but I can’t think of any other way that you’re going to wind up detecting an Nvidia card that you don’t have.

    • @TMP_NKcYUEoM7kXg4qYe
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      11 month ago

      It’s easy to misdetect the card. You just need to flash broken firmware on it that pretends it’s a different card. This is definitely not a 2070 because 1) Powercolor does not make nVidia cards and 2) RTX 2000 GPUs don’t have DVI ports.

  • @[email protected]
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    61 month ago

    It seems unlikely that with this lspci output you actually have a Radeon.

    Any sticker on the board that say it’s a Radeon? Maybe the seller “accidentally” swapped the heatsinks with a different card when cleaning that (but GPU heatsinks aren’t universal like this IMHO)

    Try on a different computer as a main GPU

  • @scrion
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    1 month ago

    lspci will read the vendor and device id via PCI and use that to determine what the device is. You might want to make the output a bit more digestable / useful via lspci -s 03:00.0 -k -nn, but I’d assume the ids that match an 2070 will show up.

    Could you please take the card out and provide us with a few pictures from different angles, maybe getting a good look at the actual chips?

    I’d like to rule that out before chasing rabbits here.

    Also, you could always run nvidia-settings, which will show information about an NVIDIA card using a different access method.

    I’d still like to see the pictures of the card though ;)