So I moved out recently and discovered I pretty much only know how to prepare scrambled eggs and smoothies.

I’ve been trying to find cool cooking resources online, but most feel like are just either clickbait or advertising me a lot of garbage (that vibe reminds me of toxic fitness channels).

Any good resources you guys may know? It doesn’t necessarily have to be YouTube channels, extra points if it has beginner level recipes, easily findable ingredients or it’s funny to follow. Thanks! :)

    • @[email protected]
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      49 months ago

      Kenji is just on another level, can’t recommend him enough. His books are great as well.

      I like his science-sy, no bullshit approach to cooking and find it very refreshing. He explains almost everything he’s doing as well as how and why he’s doing something in a particular way and has fantastic recipes and techniques.

  • @[email protected]
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    209 months ago

    Foodwishes is the OG YouTube cooking show: https://foodwishes.blogspot.com/ has over a decade of content. Recipes vary in complexity but always does a good job of breaking down the steps & explaining the what and why.

    America’s Test Kitchen and Bon Appetit both have channels with a lot of content, but are geared towards getting you to subscribe to their paid content.

    There’s also a ton of old TV content available. E.g. Good Eats has a number of episodes posted (or maybe just parts of episodes, but enough to learn).

    Kenji Lopez Alt is also a major content creator. He has several first person view videos with commentary while he cooks. This is a good format to see the cooking skills in action and help learn / improve techniques.

    Beyond these big ones, there are many good channels with focus on specific culinary styles.

  • @RisingSwell
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    209 months ago

    You Suck At Cooking has a lot of meals in a fun format, Adam Ragusea? I think that’s how you spell it, is pretty good too, longer videos and less on the meals themselves and more learning about food in general.

    • @[email protected]
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      59 months ago

      Came here to say this. His cook book is great fun as well.

      His ten ingredient chili is really easy and delicious plus it’s perfect base to start with if you want to play around with your own recipe.

      I can’t add pepper to a dish without repeating it three times. Pepper pepper pepper.

    • BananaPeal
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      29 months ago

      Heck yeah. We’ve been making his fruit popsicles this summer!

  • @[email protected]
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    149 months ago

    I think the channel “You Suck at Cooking” is a great channel. It’s funny, has a nice wide variety, and he usually tries to keep the recipies practical enough that people can do them at home.

    • @[email protected]
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      39 months ago

      I love YSaC but I wouldn’t recommend him for beginners trying to learn. There is just so much basic cooking knowledge that’s second nature to cooks with experience but completely foreign to beginners and he doesn’t really do a good job at conveying that information

  • @ArtooDeetwo
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    149 months ago

    I found myself the same many years ago and need something entertaining but look delicious. Some can be intimidating but i e replicated several of my four regular channels around this subject.

    Binging with Babish https://youtube.com/@babishculinaryuniverse

    Matty Matheson https://youtube.com/@mattymatheson

    Brian Lagerstrom https://youtube.com/@BrianLagerstrom

    Ethan Chlbowski https://youtube.com/@EthanChlebowski

    Honorable mention if you want to try your hand at any desserts/sweets for Claire Saffitz https://youtube.com/@CSaffitz

    • Nioxic
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      69 months ago

      Omg claire got her own channel!! Thanks for the link

  • @[email protected]
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    149 months ago

    Alex does mostly simple recipes, but he’s interesting because he doesn’t just try once but keeps remaking the recipe until he gets it perfect and explains the whole process and all the details.

    ANTI-CHEF does very fancy recipes from a beginner’s perspective. He shows off a lot of techniques that a more professional chef might gloss over as obvious.

  • @residentmarchant
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    139 months ago

    I’m a huge fan of Adam Ragusea. He takes a science, history, and home-cook approach to everything which makes uniquely tasty yet simple recipes. He optimizes for the fewest dishes and simpler techniques that aren’t impossible for a home cook to do.

    • AtHeartEngineer
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      49 months ago

      Definitely my favorite cooking YouTuber. His pizza videos are great!

  • 𝑔𝑎𝑙𝑎𝑥𝑖
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    139 months ago

    Speaking as someone that started with little experience, I love Adam Ragusea and Pro Home Cooks. Both explain things you never thought to ask about cooking and concepts that you can apply across lots of different dishes. I’ve learned things that I still continue to think about long after watching whenever I’m making up some food :)

  • SoNick
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    119 months ago

    Here are a few great channels from my Youtube subscriptions!

    Tasting History with Max Miller hits a perfect cross-section of my interest in cooking and my interest in history. Max goes through a historical recipe each episode and pauses part of the way through to explain the history of the dish.

    Minute Food has lots of short (sometimes under a minute!) videos about the science behind cooking.

    Chinese Cooking Demystified is a husband-and-wife duo living in China that goes over traditional Chinese recipes, I especially like how in the voice-over they frequently list substitutions for ingredients that may be difficult to find outside of China.

    Atomic Shrimp does far more than just cooking, but the cooking videos on his channel always give a neat insight into the everyday meals an older British IT Specialist makes.

  • klieg2323
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    119 months ago

    J. Kenji López-Alt is fantastic. Professional chef who shows a lot of the how and why in his videos. How to do something in the recipe, and why it’s done. Professional chef with a bunch of other paid resources if you end up liking his style

  • @[email protected]
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    109 months ago

    Internet Shaquille is something that hasn’t been mentioned yet that I think really resonates with what you’re looking for. All of his videos are short, focused, and aimed at helping regular people in the kitchen (with the exception of his April Fools videos, which satirize clickbait videos). There is some humor, but the information density of his videos reflects his ethos of not wanting to waste your time. To this end, sponsor reads appear at the end of the video (if they’re sponsored at all), so you can completely skip them.

  • @yenahmik
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    99 months ago

    I’m a bit obsessed with watching cooking shows on YouTube. Here are a few of my favorites in no particular order.

    • Anti-chef: Guy is on a journey to learn how to cook. Blew up when he started working through Julia Child’s cookbooks. He also has a series where he is trying to make something from every country in the world.

    • Barry Lewis - British guy who tries a lot of Tiktok foods, hacks, and has compares ingredients based on price

    • Beryl Shereshewsky - cooks foods from around the world based on a shared theme/ingredient

    • Pasta Grammer - Italian woman teaches her American husband about traditional Italian foods

    • Claire Saffitz - incredible baker

    • Chef John - he’s an excellent teacher

    • Sorted food - their older videos had a lot of battles and educational content. My favorite series they do is recipe relays.

    • J Kenji Lopez alt - I actually can’t watch his channel because the POV makes me motion sick. However, he’s a fantastic chef and you should watch him if the camera angle doesn’t bother you.

    • Glen and friends cooking - he tries a lot of recipes from old community cookbooks

    • Tasting History with Max Miller - tries ancient recipes and teaches you the history of that food

    • Pro home cooks - I don’t watch this channel as much anymore, but it used to be 2 brothers who taught viewers basic cooking techniques to throw together basic meals. Now it’s run by just one of the brothers and he sometimes makes more complicated items, but still has a lot of simple recipes.

    • NYT Cooking - specifically the Mystery Menu series with Sohla and Ham. Won’t necessarily teach you to cook but is fun to watch them come up with ridiculous seeming menus.