• Semi-Hemi-Demigod
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    492 months ago

    Don’t forget that generation also saw home economics classes removed from school, so if they don’t learn to cook from their parents they just don’t learn to cook.

    • Flying SquidOPM
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      102 months ago

      My daughter had whatever they call home ec now (consumer science?) last year when she was in sixth grade. They baked cookies.

      And that was about all I did in home ec back in the late 80s too. That and sew a stuffed animal dog.

      So I don’t know that home ec is actually all that worth it. Not the way it’s been done for decades, anyway.

      Industrial arts was the same way. He had us make wooden tulips after telling a bunch of horror stories about how the power tools would maim you, so I refused to use them. And had I used them, I know now as someone who has used them since that cutting tulip pieces out of a piece of wood with a jigsaw is not much of a learning experience.

      • @garbagebagel
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        72 months ago

        Yeah I definitely didn’t learn to cook at all from home ec. I remember sowing more though and I did learn the basics at least there but it was reinforced in my house, whereas cooking was not as much, so I can’t really tell if it stuck because it was a home thing too.

        I think things like, what we called tech Ed that sounds like your industrial arts, was really more about introducing kids to the concepts and they could find out if it was something they were into. Most people would never attempt or maybe even know how to attempt woodworking if not introduced in school.

        • Flying SquidOPM
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          32 months ago

          Wouldn’t they have to have the tools at home to continue woodworking? That’s pretty expensive. Isn’t that just telling kids ‘here’s something you might learn how to do someday if you aren’t poor?’

          • @garbagebagel
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            22 months ago

            I guess you got a point there hobbywise but I was thinking more like if they’re thinking about college and whatnot, if those activities are something they enjoyed in high school they might consider going into internship or trades for that kind of thing.

    • @[email protected]
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      -282 months ago

      Alternatively, they could take some initiative and use this wonderful tool called the internet…

      • @[email protected]
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        242 months ago

        Did you miss the tired and overworked comment? Feeling exhausted and burned out doesn’t inspire most people to spend a large amount of time and effort learning something new.

      • @jedibob5
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        92 months ago

        I don’t think online resources are necessarily a replacement for in-person classroom instruction, and even if they were, it’s not a reason to take the option of home ec classes away from those who want it.

        That said, I think it’s at least a good thing that so many good internet resources on cooking exist, and it helps mitigate the problem to some degree. Still, it takes time and energy to seek out those resources, learn from them, and put them into practice. Not easy to do for anyone who has been worked far past the point of burnout and are still just scraping by.

      • @fidodo
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        92 months ago

        Telling people to suck it up and just do it is a great way to feel smug while achieving nothing.

      • @[email protected]
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        62 months ago

        Cool. I checked and found the following types, which one should i go to. /s

        • 90% personal blog/vlog with vague cooking tips sprinkled within

        • instruction video where you need a specific device or machine from sponsor brand

        • overly confident with a sidedish of just as clueless and stupid

        • overly confident with a sidedish of overreliance on uncommon tool/machine they assume everyone has

        • recipe which actually makes no sense taste wise but sounds cool on paper and generates clicks

        • legit recipe but ingredients and keywords changed into google buzzword ones (bacon gets more hits then Italian ham)

        • some actually good kitchen instructors that you need to know about in advance cause there burried below the mess.

        I really enjoyed cooking with dog actually, shame that after my workday i am no longer in a condition to operate anything that can burn

      • Semi-Hemi-Demigod
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        52 months ago

        Yeah, those folks who work 16 hours and have no cooking knowledge should go out and buy a bunch of pots and pans and knives and a ton of ingredients. They don’t need to sleep and have plenty of extra money to waste on ruined food.

        What a douchey take.

        • @Num10ck
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          12 months ago

          really they could start somewhere and simple and build from it and be MUCH better off than fast food daily, for nutrition and money and time. throw some raw chicken on a grill and flip it over after 12 minutes. cut some veggies/fruit up. eventually add sauces or cheese or something.

          • @[email protected]
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            02 months ago

            Tell me your work isnt sucking 100% of your energy without saying so.

            To be fair though thats a good thing, no job should exhaust people to the point of rendering them unable to take care of themselves but for many of us that is not reality.

            • @Num10ck
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              -42 months ago

              doesn’t sound sustainable. either partner up and/or reframe your work/life balances.

              • @[email protected]
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                42 months ago

                It isn’t sustainable, which is what i am trying to explain my doctor.

                I already stopped working full time and i landed an otherwise perfect job for me, i have no real bosses and a lot of freedom to choose my work.

                I just happen to be autistic is all. The way my energy works doesn’t fit with this “work hours concept” a good work balance of me would be going to the office late when its dark, calm and quiet so i can focus, do twice the amount of work in half the time and just go home when i feel tired combined with a no strings attached guaranteed livable income.

                I can’t partner up to start my own business because the concept of profit is immoral to me. My current job provides tax-paid free healthcare for kids in contrast.

                The clutch is, so many people aren’t autistic and have it so much worse. Jobs where your boss gets upset because you’re sick, getting pressured to work overtime and still not being able to afford rent. How about cacao farmers who work permanently to pay of a debt to their employers and get fined for missing a days work?

                The modern world is not sustainable and headed for disaster.