• @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    633 months ago

    Because it’s a bandaid on an arterial bleed of a problem and has its own host of issues (anoxia once the algae blooms die off being one of the big ones, aside from the cost of actually doing it on a global scale). Lots of discussion around whether it makes sense to do, but really for the effort to do it, and the unintended effects on the environment, it would probably be better and cheaper to just reduce GHG emissions.

    • @3volverOP
      link
      -373 months ago

      Just reducing GHG emissions doesn’t stimulate the economy though.

      • Claymore
        link
        fedilink
        233 months ago

        Well, why not? Any replacement power generation or transportstion systems will require construction and maintenence, just like any other project.

        • @3volverOP
          link
          -203 months ago

          Sure, but that money wouldn’t go to oil and natural gas companies.

          • @Mautobu
            link
            73 months ago

            Depends on if those companies invest in renewables or not. Optimistically, they will need to pivot in the next 60 years or so. I expect that the military need for oil won’t go anywhere anytime soon, but there is regulation coming into play to limit automotive oil reliance. Maybe not in the US, but elsewhere.

          • @netvor
            link
            13 months ago

            hoser has a new video on how Saudi Arabia is getting ready for that part.

      • @Paragone
        link
        163 months ago

        The actual choice, is

        • we either act proactively, or
        • our remnant ( if any ) regret, retroactively.

        This isn’t consensus for a simulation/model, this is actual historical fact:

        They’re ignoring methane, and they’re stating, explicitly, that at our current atmospheric CO2, the planet historically stabilized at between +5C & +6C.

        When one factors-in the added methane, 1.3ppm to 1.4ppm, at 82.5x factor, we’re actually between +8C & +9C planet-equilibrium-temperature for our current atmosphere.

        -4C put 2 miles thick of ice on North America: planet-degrees are BIG.

        Humankind simply is either too devoutly-ignorant or too stupid to live, from the looks of it.

        After it has happened, oh, then humanity’ll admit it ought do something…

        Utterly retarded, and the obliteration-of-billions-of-lives it is setting-up the enforcing of, is needless.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        53 months ago

        Creating an entirely new industry “for the economy” is the reason this is even being contemplated. If you care more about the economy than the planet you live on and the people you share it with, then maybe that makes sense.

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    243 months ago

    Any fix on symptoms will only give the worst offenders more excuses to increase emissions. See carbon capture and carbon credits. It’s already being used as an excuse to not do anything real about the problem.

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    193 months ago

    Because band aide solutions are just bullshit distractions. We need less emissions and we need it yesterday.

    • @madcaesar
      link
      53 months ago

      I think we’re past just lowering emissions. We need to find ways pull some of the co2 out of the atmosphere.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        143 months ago

        Cool - but lowering emissions is far more effective than any of these solutions. Let’s get serious about that before discussing remediation.

    • Andy
      link
      fedilink
      63 months ago

      I apologize because I don’t have a source in mind, but my recollection from studying this in grad school (which was admittedly about a decade ago) was that sequestration was one of the hardest parts of this. Creating a bloom of algae was feasible, but even if we ignore a lot of other ecosystem management complications that others have pointed out, there wasn’t a reliable mechanism to convert a bloom of algae into a long-term carbon store.

      I could be mistaken here. I’m open-minded towards this kind of geoengineering. But I’m also very skeptical that if this could work, it could do so at a rate that would enable us to continue burning fossil fuels at scale, and there is a strong base of support for this technology among people with that attitude.

      • Syl ⏚
        link
        fedilink
        43 months ago

        Yup, we already know what we should be doing, stop using fossil fuels. The IPCC took into account carbon sequestration in their models, they said we should invest in renewable energies and eco-sufficiency (not sure if it’s the right word, but they chose “sobriété” un french)

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    8
    edit-2
    3 months ago

    CO2 emissions are not the only problem with burning things for power. Air polution causes an estimated 3.6 million deaths annualy (thats like world war 2 every 20 years), with the bulk of those (2.1 million) being caused just by ultrafine soot and ozone from burning fues. Additionaly, burning coal produces huge amount of ashes that are full of toxic heavy metals, in quanties that are near impossible to safely dispose of. Most of this ash just gets pilled up, where it it gets blown into the enviroment. (Fun fact, these ash piles are radioactive from naturaly occuring uranium and thorium)

    The only way out is to stop burning things as fuel.

    • Syl ⏚
      link
      fedilink
      3
      edit-2
      3 months ago

      Well… there are more consequences than that… Earth is heating up, which change the amount of rainfalls, where they occur, also reducing the ice sheet in the mountain for example. This would provide less freshwater. Less freshwater will reduce agriculture output, which could bring famine. People will migrate because they are living in unlivable places, and this may bring civil unrest.

      Yes we should stop burning fuel, learn how to produce food wirhout relying on fossil fuels, learn how to live wirh less.

  • WastedJobe
    link
    fedilink
    73 months ago

    It could change the pH of the oceans, making it harder for anything to live there. Plus, it might not store the CO2 for longer than 1000 years, which doesnt really solve the issue (I have a source for that somewhere, I think it was the IPCC).