When I speak, unless I’m sharing the screen I always keep looking at myself. It’s kind of strange – it clearly does not match a real-world conversation, but somehow I can’t help it.

Edit: More context – I’m wondering if others have it, if this is something that can be explained by some “brain” thing, and also how does it affect the conversation.

  • Admiral Patrick
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    2 months ago

    I try not to, but more often than not, it’s pretty much exactly this (whether I’m talking or listening):

    I get on a video call, and I basically turn into a bird with a mirror.

  • @owenfromcanada
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    252 months ago

    Consider where you look when you’re talking to someone in person. Do you look at them continuously? We generally don’t do that, it ends up being weird and creepy. Our eyes wander as we talk, so it’s natural that we’d do the same during a video call.

    And consider this: when your own face is visible to you, when aren’t you looking at yourself? Typically when I see my face, it’s in a bathroom mirror, and it’s natural to look at yourself (whether to take note of your appearance or otherwise).

    So I think it’s pretty natural, and I’m guessing lots of people do it.

    • @Dozzi92
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      22 months ago

      I look slightly above their eyes, at the forehead or even as high as their hairline. I do not break contact with their upper face.

  • @[email protected]
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    202 months ago

    Only to check and make sure I look normal every now and then.

    I hate when the person sharing their screen brings up their view of the video chat, so now I see myself full screen and I don’t want that

    • @Puttaneska
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      52 months ago

      Yeah…it’s worth checking that your face is centralised.

      Last week my wife ran a video call at work with the camera on her cleavage.

      • @ralakus
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        11 month ago

        The infamous Twitch streamer camera setup

  • @acetanilide
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    132 months ago

    Yes. IIRC it’s one reason video conferencing is so exhausting

  • gimpchrist
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    122 months ago

    I just love looking at myself I think I’m great haha I also like to make sure that my facial expressions are matching my inside emotions …a lot of the time they are and I like the reassurance of that… I also like to practice facial expressions and then look at myself to make sure I’m executing them correctly. But mostly I just like my face and what it does haha

    • RickRussell_CA
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      102 months ago

      This is why customer service folks often keep a mirror by the phone, looking at their own faces helps to keep their emotions in check when dealing with a difficult customer.

    • @netvorOP
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      12 months ago

      I just love looking at myself I think I’m great haha I also like to make sure that my facial expressions are matching my inside emotions …a lot of the time they are and I like the reassurance of that… I also like to practice facial expressions and then look at myself to make sure I’m executing them correctly. But mostly I just like my face and what it does haha

      … -agen.

  • @netvorOP
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    102 months ago

    funny how lot of comments are saying “i also look at my face while other person is talking”

    what I meant when I was writing this post: looking at my face while I was talking.

    …on second thought, I’m not sure, I might as well just be looking at myself 100% time.

    • Admiral Patrick
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      2 months ago

      When I’m talking, I try to look at the camera (which is on my middle monitor). Depending on which monitor the video call is displaying on, sometimes I’m not even looking at any of the participants or myself. That does seem to help me act more “natural”.

  • @dexa_scantron
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    72 months ago

    Yep. Everybody does. Watch where their eyes are pointing, you can tell. I hide the window on apps that let me (or un-maximize the window and slide it off the screen a bit if I’m on one side).

    • @[email protected]
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      2 months ago

      I am not a child. I move my frame dead center so I never drift.

      This is at minimum my second rodeo

    • @netvorOP
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      42 months ago

      From where their eyes are pointing I can only tell whether or not they’re looking at the camera, but if they are looking elsewhere, I have no way of knowing if that other place is my face or theirs or anything else (even outside scope of the talk – it could be a bug crawling on their desk for all I know).

      • @dexa_scantron
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        12 months ago

        If they’re consistently looking down and to the right (for most apps) and not scanning/reading, they’re probably looking at their own video. I’ve certainly noticed it.

  • @[email protected]
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    62 months ago

    I do. I spend a fair amount of time glancing between my thumbnail and the speakers.

    Sometimes I turn my thumbnail off, so I don’t do it, but then I worry that I have a booger hanging out my nose, so I turn it back on.

    • @netvorOP
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      32 months ago

      but that just opens the worrying space more: what if you turned the camera back on and there it was? isn’t it better to not know? 🙃

  • @[email protected]
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    62 months ago

    I might be odd here. I don’t look at myself, and if I could hide my video feed from myself, I would. I think I look strange, so I find it distracting. I also avoid watching myself on video in general.

  • @[email protected]
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    62 months ago

    I stare at the camera so everyone else can see me staring into their soul.

    J/k, I look at whoever is talking or whoever has some eye catching background, which sometimes is me.

    • Possibly linux
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      42 months ago

      Don’t blink or show any emotion. Just stare stone cold into the camera

      • @netvorOP
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        12 months ago

        bonus points if they think that your connection is lagging

    • @Dozzi92
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      32 months ago

      I swear people in on Zoom to testify and for some reason I took to looking at the camera because it perhaps makes it more official, since I assume they’re looking at me. I dunno. Life is one big joke.

  • @kryptonianCodeMonkey
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    2 months ago

    I do it as well. If I’m not actively speaking and the person speaking isn’t presenting something that I need to look at, I usually end up bouncing back and forth between the speaker and my image.

    I don’t want to necessarily apply logic to it because I don’t think it’s a conscious, logic decision I’m making. But if I had to try, I’d say that the reasons are A) I cannot “look them in the eye” as I would in person without looking directly at my camera, which is both weird and means I’m literally looking away from them. That is the paradox of video calling. B) Looking at them, versus looking literally anywhere else on your screen makes no tangible difference to anyone else looking at your video feed. C) I want to make sure I am not looking ridiculous while blasting my image to a dozen people. No double chin, no resting bitch face, no glazed look, no boogers, etc. D) Staring at anyone else would feel weird, invasive, and distracting to me, including the speaker, if they are not actively speaking to me. It feels like I’m eavesdropping when I’m not actively being addressed. E) Gotta take advantage of having eyes on the back of your head. Never turn your back on your enemy. Stay vigilant. The cat will not pounce me and claw my back mid-meeting again.

  • gregorum
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    42 months ago

    I wanna make sure my hair looks nice and that the camera is positioned properly

  • @hperrin
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    1 month ago

    Yeah. I look at whoever is talking, even when it’s me.