• @Sarla
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    985 days ago

    Americans will literally do anything except build trains

    • @pyre
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      135 days ago

      now that we have this river across the whole country, we can finally introduce swimming cars!

      • @BitchPeas
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        55 days ago

        You mean plastic bubbles?

        • @pyre
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          54 days ago

          or normal cars in bubble wrap… see we’re already brainstorming like it’s a Tesla project

    • @Sigh_Bafanada
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      55 days ago

      You can create this strait and then have a train which runs along it, like the train from Spirited Away

      • @ZeffSyde
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        14 days ago

        What if we made some sort of floating train?

      • @LwL
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        84 days ago

        They’re nowhere near the top if you relate it to size though (and also next to none of it is electrified, which is a pretty good indicator of it being mostly old - after all, rail is what even allowrd the country to be built).

        But also it’s a joke

        • @[email protected]
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          24 days ago

          I object to electrification being used to judge a country’s railway age and quality. A lot of countries transition into electric trains over a century ago especially in Europe and surprisingly the US. I could talk for hours about the US’s history with electric trains and how short sided business practices combined with the government’s attempt to sorta nationalize the rail industry crippled it’s electrification progress. Not to get too far off topic though there’s only three metrics you can really grade the quality and age of a nation’s rail infrastructure with. That is size, volume, and average speed. In my opinion though avarage speed is the best indicator for a country’s railway age and quality because it gets rid of a lot of the problems other definitions bring up. For example both of the internationally recognized definitions for high speed rail uses a different speed depending if the line was new (155mph) or upgraded (125mph). This causes all sorts of issues because under those definitions Amtrak’s northeast regional train counts as high speed rail as it runs on an upgraded line with a top speed of 125mph even though the northeast corridor has an average speed of 86mph.

    • @Rayspekt
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      325 days ago

      Panama Canal is the biggest NIMBY project ever

      • @Serinus
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        235 days ago

        Because it was built at the thinnest part of the content and used existing lakes?

        Pretty sure Omaha would have loved an East\West canal across the continent.

          • @Serinus
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            85 days ago

            But it was done, which is kind of the opposite of NIMBY. Also it’s not a project that could go anywhere, except that no one wants it.

            Closing Guantanamo was a NIMBY thing because, while everyone agrees it should happen, no one wanted the detainees in their backyard. (As ridiculous as that is.)

            • @Rayspekt
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              -15 days ago

              The Panama canal was a US NIMBY project I’d argue. Give us the canal but without impacting our territory.

              • @Cypher
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                45 days ago

                Your comment is actually insane.

                There is no way the US would not have preferred the canal to be in their backyard.

              • @AngryCommieKender
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                4 days ago

                We didn’t maintain administration of the canal for just over a century for no reason. We would have put that shit in the Rio Grande, if we could have. Unfortunately that river runs dry for several months a year.

                Especially since that particular area of the world is some of the least developed.

    • @HootinNHollerin
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      It connected several lakes in the narrowest part of the continent. Not ‘exactly that’ at all

  • @[email protected]
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    4 days ago

    Assuming the river would be identical in depth and breadth to the Panama canal, if every man, woman, and child in the US picked up a shovel they would need to move 305 cubic feet of dirt each. So if we all just moved 1 cubic foot of dirt per day, we could pull this off in a year.

    • @HootinNHollerin
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      11 day ago

      That’s how the Soviet gulags built canals and railroads btw. Lots of deaths

    • @[email protected]
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      94 days ago

      Hey, you’re a numbers guy right? What’s to say we take all that extra dirt and make an island? Asking for a friend

    • @Gonzako
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      54 days ago

      Let’s fucking goooo

  • VådFisk
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    5 days ago

    If they could do it in ancient Greece then Americans can do it today for sure!

    Stolen from [email protected]

    Also: although planned over 2000 years ago, it wasn’t really made by ancient Greeks. They gave up and made a road to transport ships on it instead of actually digging. Only in modern time did they actually finish the canal

    • @[email protected]
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      155 days ago

      Wait… They had a movable pool that they rode the ships into and then horses dragged to the other waterway? That sounds awesome

      • @[email protected]
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        95 days ago

        Better even. They made the movable pool quite long. So while the horses dragged the pool the ships could still sail in it. That way the horses didn’t need to drag the pool the whole way!

        • VådFisk
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          105 days ago

          I dont think so. Not in this case at least. They gave up digging in the hard rock and instead made a limestone road to drive them on dry surface.

          This is the Corinth canal but before it was made the paved road for transporting ships was called Diolkos

          • @[email protected]
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            145 days ago

            I know. I was just expanding on the other persons joke (I assume he joked). :)

            You are a good person for being this patient and sharing your knowledge.

    • @[email protected]
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      164 days ago

      I love the 1950s, the solution to any problem was just “idk, have you tried nuking it?”

    • The Menemen!
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      4 days ago

      This might also make it really easy to hit the 2 degree climate target.

      • @ours
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        24 days ago

        More like the -2 degree Celcius average World temperature target.

    • @radicalautonomy
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      4 days ago

      About 36 feet above sea level though. How are we gonna clear a waterway from coast to coast, though? C’mon, boffins, let’s sort this out!

    • I'm back on my BS 🤪
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      3 days ago
      1. Creeper farm for gunpowder
      2. Dig a bunch if sand
      3. Craft TNT
      4. Place two blocks of TNT spaced out by 5 blocks
      5. Light first TNT with the flint thingy
      6. Run along side it for the experience
      7. Bring buckets and cobblestone for inevitable underground lakes of water and lava 8 .Collect all the cool things you uncovered
      8. Ask gf/bf to come look at your accomplishment (optional)
    • @Asidonhopo
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      24 days ago

      Diamond should be enough, making that many beds to mine netherite seems excessive especially since the update

      • @[email protected]
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        94 days ago

        I wouldn’t be so certain about that. Evaporation might be stronger similar to the mediterreanian sea. So water would flow from both sides into the channel.

        But such a project probably disturbes weather patterns and ocean currents all together. Hence, I don’t think we can be curtain until we’ve tried it. Now grab your shovel. FOR SCIENCE!

  • @aeronmelon
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    285 days ago

    “I get my kicks… on Canal 66.”

  • @ArgentRaven
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    275 days ago

    You might need to account for an extra day or two to dig down low enough in the rocky mountains. Unless you’re working with a friend and they brought their own shovel.

  • @[email protected]
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    135 days ago

    A lot of the canals in the world (the majority I think, but please fact check that) were built in the 19th century. So yeah… with shovels.

  • TurboWafflz
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    125 days ago

    With the low resolution I can’t quite tell if I would suddenly live on the beach or underwater

  • Rhaedas
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    235 days ago

    My first thought was if this was remotely possible on this scale, how many things would be disrupted and changed from the water movement alone. The Panama canal has to have locks because of the ocean differences, but no way would you have locks spanning a few hundred miles across. This thing would have tides back and forth.