• @Adalast
      link
      409 months ago

      I came to say this. I have also noticed a strong trend amongst people from each generation for health.

      Teflon was introduced in 1938, when my grandfather was 11. In the 1955, when my father was born, is the last time that we have Teflon untainted blood from. At some point between 1955 and 1985 when I was born, Teflon proliferated to the point that it was being found in every blood sample around the world.

      So my grandfather lived ~40-50 years without being massively contaminated with Teflon, my father probably got to adulthood, and I have never been without it. Now an anecdotal sample that follows a larger trend. My grandfather is in his 90’s with pretty good health and is still going pretty strong. My father and both of his siblings are in their 60’s-70’s and all have failing health, and I know so few people in my own age range that are actually healthy without autoimmune disease or other systemic issue that I couldn’t fill a high school auditorium with them.

      • @Wade
        link
        429 months ago

        Not saying that there’s nothing wrong with microplastics or PFAS, but keep in mind there’s survival bias at play here.

      • Lev_Astov
        link
        79 months ago

        I have seen the exact opposite as, aside from obesity problems, each generation I’ve seen has had significantly higher life expectancy than the last.

        I know multiple people now who have outlived the short life expectancy their health complications in the 80s supposedly gave them. I know a few families who have people living longer than anyone else in their blood line ever has. The heart and lung problems that killed off my grandparents have been dealt with now and my parents and my generation are already outliving them and far healthier at our ages.

        This is all thanks to great medical advancement, of course, but the point is this isn’t some dire threat that warrants doom and gloom, but another medical hurdle for us to be aware of and work out like we have all the others.

    • iesou
      link
      fedilink
      99 months ago

      And they’re all full of microplastics, and we also all have a decent amount of lead.

    • @WolfhoundRO
      link
      79 months ago

      And animal 'roids AND microplastics

        • @WolfhoundRO
          link
          39 months ago

          Yes, by either raising your own farm animals, buying dairy and meat products from known and truly eco producers or going vegan. The last option, though, might get you into another category of chemicals and/or GMOs if you don’t carefully select the products and categories based on labeling and nutritional values and knowledge

    • @NightAuthor
      link
      English
      69 months ago

      Teflon is so unreactive (by design) that it largely passes right through you.

      • UltraMagnus0001
        link
        19
        edit-2
        9 months ago

        Scientists are still learning about the effects of PFAS on humans, but studies show these chemicals can harm different systems in the body.

        The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry says exposure to PFAS may lead to higher risk for kidney or testicular cancer, increased cholesterol levels, and damage to the liver and immune system.

        My hospital sent an email out that for unknown reasons liver disease is on the rise for non drinkers and people without diabetes.

        https://www.sciencenews.org/article/pfas-forever-chemicals-health-risk-water

        https://www.npr.org/2022/06/22/1106863211/the-dangers-of-forever-chemicals

        • @NightAuthor
          link
          English
          39 months ago

          Well it also looks like PFAS is a big group of chemicals, and brand name Teflon now uses a specific version called PTFE which they (can you trust them?) claim is not as bad as PFAS.

          But even if that’s true, the production of it still produces tons of known toxic waste.

          Ya know… I think my original notion I got from Johnny Harris…. Whom I’ve actually grown a bit skeptical of lately.

          • UltraMagnus0001
            link
            1
            edit-2
            9 months ago

            I switched over to ceramic pans, specifically the Ayesha Curry ones, but who knows if that will be bad in the future. I tried the Caphalon ceramic and those were horrible. The nonstick pans are bad for you over a certain temperature where it breaks down. There’s an excellent movie called Dark Waters about the original lawsuit and that man is a hero.

            https://m.imdb.com/title/tt9071322/

        • Patapon Enjoyer
          cake
          link
          29 months ago

          You seem to know this so I’ll ask. Are all non stick pans PFAS? If not, how to tell if it’s a good one?

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            69 months ago

            Ceramic pans are non stick as well as properly seasoned cast iron, neither of which uses Teflon.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        89 months ago

        The problem is that it’s so inert, it becomes impossible to remove from a contaminated environment or particularly a person’s blood stream.

        The amount that inevitably gets caught in your blood will just stay in your body forever, settling down in a critical organ like your brain or kidneys and giving you cancer or some other horrible problem.

  • @AllonzeeLV
    link
    117
    edit-2
    9 months ago

    Please stop the ride, I want off

    “Good News, Everyone!”

    -Climate Change

  • @SexyTimeSasquatch
    link
    769 months ago

    Elder millennial here, I get all three! What’s my prize?

    • @Nudding
      link
      639 months ago

      Climate apocalypse

      • @Siegfried
        link
        99 months ago

        At least I have something to blame for my mental issues

      • TimeSquirrel
        link
        fedilink
        45
        edit-2
        9 months ago

        Leaded gasoline wasn’t fully phased out in the US until 1996, not sure about other countries. The millennial age bracket starts somewhere around the birth year 1982.

        Fun fact: it’s still used in piston aircraft.

        Edit: sorry, that’s not very fun.

        • @[email protected]
          link
          fedilink
          English
          139 months ago

          NASCAR didn’t switch to unleaded gasoline until 2007, and test scores went up in the areas surrounding their racetracks in the following years.

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            English
            19 months ago

            Apparently you can still buy leaded race fuels in the US today, wtf? Ban that shit. I was watching a video yesterday of someone why brought their time-attack racecar to Australia and they had to retune it for unleaded because leaded is banned there. I was blown away they were using leaded fuel in the first place.

        • @gnate
          link
          English
          89 months ago

          This made me reconsider the foundations of the high crime rates in the neighborhoods nearest the very busy small plane airport in my home town.

          • @captainlezbian
            link
            99 months ago

            Yeah look into Liberian history and you’ll understand why

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        15
        edit-2
        9 months ago

        Oh it definitely happens. I’m a young millennial and I have a friend my age who deals with mental issues because he ate lead paint leftover in their old house as a child. Lead was so prevalent at one point that getting rid of it all isn’t as simple as flipping a switch.

        Edit: [wasn’t -> isn’t] There does not in fact exist a switch that we can now flip to remove lead. Thanks @[email protected].

      • Altima NEO
        cake
        link
        fedilink
        English
        159 months ago

        Lead paint was still on the stuff we grew up in. Lead in the plumbing used in our schools, too.

      • @PunnyName
        link
        139 months ago

        While it wasn’t commonplace in gas in the early 80s, it was still prevalent on a lot of long lasting products, and of course, paint.

      • @SexyTimeSasquatch
        link
        119 months ago

        I was in my early teens in the 90s when leaded gas was finally banned in the US. Furthermore, lead doesn’t degrade, only slowly disperse. People born in the early 80s still got a hefty dose of lead. Yay us.

        • TimeSquirrel
          link
          fedilink
          49 months ago

          At least we dodged asbestos insulation, and only have to deal with it in old construction when we tear down the walls.

  • SuperDuper
    link
    749 months ago

    Don’t forget about asbestos!

      • _haha_oh_wow_
        link
        fedilink
        229 months ago

        Nanostructures? Sheeit, wait until we get to responding to ourselves from another federated service! Wait, what were we talking about?

      • @TheGoldenGodOP
        link
        179 months ago

        You’ll get $9.37 and the lawyers will get $230 billion.

    • @Adalast
      link
      129 months ago

      That’s great-grandpa.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        69 months ago

        My mother (a boomer) died of an asbestos cancer (one of the better kinds of asbestos deaths) because her mother used asbestos heat spreaders on the stove

        Those were asbestos cloth and they slowly disintegrated during use (between the stove and the pans) putting asbestos fibres into the air

      • @droans
        link
        59 months ago

        I mean it wasn’t banned until the 70s.

          • @droans
            link
            19 months ago

            And it used to be Australia.

            Everything there is trying to kill you!

        • @[email protected]
          link
          fedilink
          39 months ago

          Depends on where you live. In some countries it wasn’t banned until the 80s, 90s, or even later.

    • @Ddhuud
      link
      49 months ago

      Great grandparent of these yutes.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        169 months ago

        The reality is that all 3 are full of micro plastics. And there’s some overlap in the Teflon lead generation. And non stick material is still not all that great.

        Really, the only problem we’ve solved kinda is lead, unless you’re poor.

        • @[email protected]
          cake
          link
          fedilink
          49 months ago

          To be fair most people still cook with teflon, albeit PFOA-free, so we’re still actively consuming teflon. And the worst part? You need to use plastic cooking-utensils with teflon pans. And as plastic utensils wear down they shed lots of microplastics straight into your food.

          I’m usually very sceptical about things that “might supposedly” be bad for you, but even I refuse to buy any teflon pan and/or plastic cooking utensils. I now use cast iron with steel utensils :D

    • @Fallenwout
      link
      79 months ago

      Radiation? That’s were the lead poisoning comes in handy ;)

  • @Dr_pepper_spray
    link
    25
    edit-2
    9 months ago

    Trust me, Microplastics boy. You’re full of those other things too.

    Also all three of you are likely full of shit … because your colons are full of cancerous polyps.

    • @PunnyName
      link
      149 months ago

      Funding the big corporations that poison us, because so many are anti regulation.

  • @NocturnalMorning
    link
    139 months ago

    Fun fact, Teflon was invented by dupont. And the Wikipedia page is fairly clear on the safety of Teflon being in question. The real concern is who did Dupont pay off to make Teflon a thing?

    • @PunnyName
      link
      19
      edit-2
      9 months ago

      Teflon is safe in typical use cases.

      Here’s a great video from Adam Ragusea: https://youtu.be/5FNNKhVoUu8?si=vXrfusnsGzvXErfn

      The real issue is PFAS or PFOA, which are used to help bind Teflon, or other nonstick polymers, to other surfaces. This was all done in the early 1900s, and the likelihood of some conspiracy is low. Especially since they didn’t (and literally couldn’t) know the long term effects of “forever chemicals”.

      The real conspiratorial behavior comes AFTER the knowledge that PFAS or PFOA are harmful, and what actions, or inactions, of the companies and government are taken.

      Remember there are people in our government (not all, but enough) who actively want LESS government: less regulation, less taxation, leas oversight. AND there are a vast quantity of companies that want the very same thing: unfettered freedom to do whatever the fuck they want, without consequence.

      And that handful of government employees will easily be bribed or influenced by special interest lobby groups, businesses, “think tanks”, etc. (funded and/or founded by the aforementioned businesses).

      _
      Getting a NEW Teflon pan is less than ideal, and should be avoided. You can keep the one you have, and keep using it until the nonstick properties degrade, then toss it.

      A great video about this from MinuteFood: https://youtu.be/R1hbV3EzOD4?si=bQZAQsRWLgX9dyJX

      And the associated MinuteEarth video: https://youtu.be/H3aFzQdWQTg?si=bVIBp4tm_uLi7ScQ

    • @Fallenwout
      link
      09 months ago

      Leaded addons for fuel was invented by the same guy who invented freon as pressure gas in aerosols and airco making a hole in the ozon layer. He fucked us twice

  • @Gingerlegs
    link
    139 months ago

    Jokes on you, my house still has some lead pipes