yeap, uplifting. Again.

  • @[email protected]
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    724 months ago

    The dystopic part is that it’s assumed an intelligent person is expected to achieve less due to their lineage.

    • @[email protected]
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      234 months ago

      It’s not just “assumed”. There have been numerous studies that people with better social networks and resources around them are much more likely to succeed. It’s not surprising at all

  • Chainweasel
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    284 months ago

    That poor kid, imagine having the title “girl born in jail” following you around for the rest of your life regardless of what you accomplished.

  • @glimse
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    134 months ago

    It is uplifting. A child born under awful circumstances overcame there obstacles that life handed her where most people would fail. Props to her father and mentors for helping her, too.

    Seems like a stretch to post this here but I imagine there’s some hoop jumping someone’s gonna do to justify it.

    • @SpaceNoodle
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      194 months ago

      The community rallied around her to give her the support she needed to succeed. What might happen if we helped everyone?

      • @glimse
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        -34 months ago

        Then more people would succeed. But that has nothing to do with a dystopian society, that’s just human nature. Been going on like that forever

    • @[email protected]
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      -14 months ago

      “Awful circumstances”.

      What were the circumstances? Why would most people fail in those circumstances?

      • @glimse
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        154 months ago

        Being born to a criminal?? In a jail no less?

        Generational trauma is hard to escape.

        • @SpaceNoodle
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          54 months ago

          In a different timeline, she grew up to be Bane

        • @[email protected]
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          24 months ago

          “A criminal”. Society decides who is a criminal, and decides to let a baby be born in a prison.

          You didn’t even ask why the woman was in prison in the first place before deciding she was the problem, so you’re believing society’s branding of her as a criminal. Gee, I wonder if attitudes like that make it harder on someone who was born in prison?

          • @glimse
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            44 months ago

            I am making the assumption that she wasn’t wrongfully imprisoned, yes. The only context I have to go on is that she’s never spoken to her daughter.

            Why are you assuming she wasn’t a criminal? Are white women statistically likely to be sent to jail for minor crimes?

            • @[email protected]
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              4 months ago

              So the fact that the US has the largest prison system in history, with nearly 1% of its entire population imprisoned, and nearly 25% of the entire world’s prison population, doesn’t make you think that maybe society has some role in deciding how many people get sent to prison? Do you think that the US is just somehow filled with an especially “criminal” class of person?

              And going to prison does enormous harm to individuals. You don’t know what that woman’s life might’ve been like without prison, without the poverty that prison causes, or without the poverty-to-prison pipeline, without having her daughter forcibly taken away from her.

              And of course she’s a criminal, but that’s a legal status. There isn’t some separate lower class of human being that is a “criminal”. You seem to be talking as if she is a “criminal” in some other sense of the word.

              • @glimse
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                14 months ago

                You’re out here wishfully thinking and making a ton of assumptions based on nothing and I’m saying she was born with half the support structure therefore had more hurdles to jump. Why are we talking about the mother’s crime again?

                Ironically this is exactly what I said would happen in my first post - someone jumping through hoops to spin this as dystopian

                • @[email protected]
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                  14 months ago

                  You’re out here wishfully thinking and making a ton of assumptions based on nothing and I’m saying she was born with half the support structure therefore had more hurdles to jump. Why are we talking about the mother’s crime again?

                  I’m going to be honest with you, I have no idea what you’re even trying to say here. Like… just find the quotes or something and copy them here. This is so vague I just don’t even know what you’re referring to.

                  Ironically this is exactly what I said would happen in my first post - someone jumping through hoops to spin this as dystopian

                  the largest prison system in history, with nearly 1% of its entire population imprisoned, and nearly 25% of the entire world’s prison population

                  How on earth do you spin that as not dystopian? You have to ignore it, right? Because that’s what you’ve done.

            • @[email protected]
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              4 months ago

              You’ve just admitted that there are other factors. Do you think the prison industrial complex plays an insignificant role?

              • @[email protected]
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                4 months ago

                Your claim does not arise from my comment. From my comment, you can only infer the perpetrator’s responsibility.

                • @[email protected]
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                  24 months ago

                  Ah, so the context in which your comment occurs is completely irrelevant, just like the context in which a woman was forced to give birth in a prison and then to give up said baby is also, apparently, irrelevant.

                  Tell me, was there any reason you felt the need to spout this random fact, or did it occur to you to write those words in that order under my comment entirely ex-nihilo?

  • @[email protected]
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    134 months ago

    Dyslexia definitely made me wonder why she was going to jail. Seems she overcame whatever was holding her parent(s) back when seems at least a little uplifting.

  • @[email protected]
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    74 months ago

    toured the Harvard campus with Castner in March 2022, which helped solidify the teen’s decision to attend the university later this year. “After that trip, I saw her love for the school intensify,”

    Who the hell would look at Harvard and say “Nah, I don’t this school is good enough for me.”?

  • @[email protected]
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    04 months ago

    my favourite part is how she’s going to study law, but there’s no mention of her mother, so I can only presume this kid thinks people do actually belong in jail.

    You think he community rallies around young Black kids and raises money for their orthodontic work too?? /s

    • @[email protected]
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      4 months ago

      from the article:

      Castner’s mother was in jail when she gave birth to her. She has not played a role in her daughter’s life since the day Castner’s father picked her up as a newborn from the prison, raising her as a single father, the outlet said.

    • @rockSlayer
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      34 months ago

      Lawyers will also be necessary for prison abolition.