• @[email protected]
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        154 months ago

        I explicitly bought an AMD CPU and GPU and did not have any trouble with both of them ever since

        • dave@hal9000
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          34 months ago

          If I knew about all this pain many years ago when I bought my NVIDIA card, I would have done the same…

    • @[email protected]
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      104 months ago

      God, nearly every time I Google a problem I have, it’s NVIDIA. The rest is that I want to share my steam library from my windows-installation on a NTFS drive

  • @[email protected]
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    514 months ago

    Nvidia Arch user here, are you just forgetting to rebuild your kernel modules after a kernel or nvidia driver update?

    You can just add a pacman hook that triggers mkinitcpio -P after the linux or nvidia packages are updated. I’ve never had a no-GUI situation from a stray update… maybe one or two that were my own doing when trying to set up UKI’s though.

      • yeehaw
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        24 months ago

        I think dkms is for inserting kernel modules, but I’m dumb and what’s the difference between both these approaches?

        • @pizzawithdirt
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          24 months ago

          The Dynamic Kernel Module System automatically builds your modules for your updated kernel.

    • @[email protected]
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      124 months ago

      The Arch Linux team releases Nvidia updates at the same time as kernel upgrades which should trigger a initramfs rebuild via mkinitcpio anyway

      unless you do a partial upgrade anyway (never do that)

    • @Dnn
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      54 months ago

      I just followed the note that’s mentioned on the top of your link and installed the Nvidia driver as dkms package. I originally did that because of trouble with a new driver version and temporary downgrading is much smoother with dkms.

      Also never had issues with the DE starting properly after upgrade since then.

      • @[email protected]
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        24 months ago

        I’m usually using nvidia-beta drivers from AUR because they’re newer, so I just added the hook as an insurance policy.

        The DKMS drivers are probably the safer option because they’ll handle rebuilding the kernel modules. Even though (like EddyBot said) the kernel and nvidia packages are supposed to get updated together, sometimes you can spam pacman -Syu at the wrong time and only one package is updated and things go wonky…

    • @EpicFailGuy
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      34 months ago

      yep, just as easy as windows

      (I actually work with redhat and cent … bring it on neets)

  • @PainInTheAES
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    334 months ago

    Just learn how to do everything in the TTY. GUIs are bloat

    • Séra Balázs
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      384 months ago

      I already did, but wobbly windows is my love!

    • @herrvogel
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      94 months ago

      Don’t bother with the tty. If experienced chess players can play entire games in their heads, why can’t you just do the same to use a computer? Just type away and use your superior power usering skills to visualize the output in your head.

    • siha
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      164 months ago

      When bleeding edge bleeds: ¶:

      • @taanegl
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        34 months ago

        Fedora: uhm excuse me wtf?

    • @RageAgainstTheRich
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      134 months ago

      I want it rolling in updates. Not rolling into the river and drowning itself.

  • @[email protected]
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    194 months ago

    What did you edited ? Arch user here, never had this kind of issue. Also if you managed to install Arch, you should be able to fix it(maybe you switched from terminals, try ctrl+alt+1-9)

    • @[email protected]
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      204 months ago

      You were just lucky. For some of us ut was just about having the wrong hardware at the wrong time.

      Not complaining, I knew the risks going in and still love my distro, but arch updates totally can brick a PC with no PEBCAK involved. It does happen. :3

      • @[email protected]
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        -174 months ago

        Arch dosn’t break by itself, i’ve used bunch of Arch installations and every time it broke it was because of bad manipulation, not pacman -syu

            • @SkyeHarith
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              114 months ago

              Arch breaking grub has happened to me twice. Second time I couldn’t even recover the install.

              You learn a lot of good practices by using arch, eg a separate home partitjon, git repositories for your config files, maintaining a clean package tree etc. Installing Arch is also really useful for noobs like me to learn some Linux basics.

              I use Fedora, btw.

              • @[email protected]
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                34 months ago

                maintaining a clean package tree

                What do you mean by that, specifically? I looked that up online and maybe I’m a bit dumb, but I didn’t find anything that made much sense

                • @SkyeHarith
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                  44 months ago

                  I don’t know if that’s a widely recognized term.

                  Pacman used to be really bad at removing unneeded dependencies. I think pretty much every package manager has this facility now. For instant apt auto remove.

                  Suppose you installed gnome to try it out, gnome installs like 1000000 packages. The thing about some of those dependencies is that they’re really useful. It’s not uncommon for another package you have installed to use it as an optional dependency. In that case it doesn’t get flagged for autoremoval when you uninstall gnome.

                  When you apply this logic a couple layers deep they start to compound.

                  Also libraries and random python scripts tend to just exist forever in your system long after you used it lol.

                  I started developing the habit of checking what dependencies are being installed and to uninstall immediately when I realize I don’t need it.

                  This logic applies to language specific managers like cargo or pip too.

                  They all have really good tooling to figure out leaves, orphaned nodes etc. I just didn’t start using those until I got into the arch hype.

            • @[email protected]
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              I was among one of the grub fiasco victims. Thank goodness they rolled it back pretty fast and I knew how to chroot.

            • ☭ SaltyIceteaMaker ☭
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              44 months ago

              I have not experienced it but half of the arch users on reddit seem to have experienced it. Also it’s not a continuous problem but rather a problem with a certain arch and grub version. However the fact it happened once (to many people) means it can happen a second time

            • @[email protected]
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              4 months ago

              A grub breaking thingy happened to me too.
              I was saved by having multiboot, with every OS having their own GRUB version installed. (just selected one using the motherboard’s interface)

              The problem occurred when, after pacman -Syu, I read notes in the output, one of which hinted I would want to update GRUB and went - “Sure, I’ll try the new GRUB update” and ran GRUB update.

              When it didn’t startup after a restart, I just used the debian’s GRUB to login to the OS in question, downgraded GRUB, reinstalled GRUB and then ran pacman -Syu again.

              I feel like mine wasn’t the problem instance that goes on around the web, mostly because:

              1. None of the mentioned fixes worked in my case.
              2. I feel like people won’t go out of their way to update GRUB most of the time.
        • guskikalola :linux:
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          54 months ago

          @Titou @Nisaea Well, in my case it once broke due to a conflict between pahole and nvidia that caused errors. Games would crash every now and then. I was going crazy until I found that the update broke nvidia :}

          • @[email protected]
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            04 months ago

            How did you installed it ? Official arch repo or self compiled ? And what nvidia drivers are you using ? Nouveau or proprietary one ?

            • guskikalola :linux:
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              44 months ago

              @Titou proprietary drivers, dkms version.
              Official repos.

              Both my friend and I experienced this, a few minutes later pahole was reverted to previous version on the repos and the update was delayed until fixes were made.

              I migrated from nvidia to amd last summer and no issues since then ( a few crashes in Minecraft, its the only game capable of crashing the GPU, dont know why or how ).

              • @[email protected]
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                24 months ago

                Conflict issues is not arch-exclusive(happenned to me on debian sid months ago) but glad to heard you switched to amd

    • @SkyeHarith
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      Sounds like a skill issue. Some people just don’t know how to use Arch.

      Signed,

      Someone who has spent more days reinstalling Arch than using it.

      • yeehaw
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        14 months ago

        Yeah I dealt with that for a long while. Always used lynx or similar to go download the latest Linux driver from nvidias website, then manually install it lol. What a pain in the ass.

    • @[email protected]
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      I use archinstall. I draw the line at having to use the command line to set up all your stupid partitions. That’s too complicated.

  • @bouh
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    194 months ago

    Why are you using arch Linux if not to debug your system though?

    • @excitingburp
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      84 months ago

      There’s a difference between “can” and “want.” For example, OP might have been planning to watch his home vids with your mom, but couldn’t due to a rolling update.

      • @bouh
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        24 months ago

        That’s the problem with obnoxious updates, actually.

    • Yer Ma
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      24 months ago

      Funny because just like those door to door bible sales, Tumbleweed promises magic and salvation, but completely crumbles under any stress or expansion

      • @[email protected]
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        54 months ago

        Not my experience at all. It’s the one distro that stopped my distro hopping.

        Besides, something goes fucky or (more likely in my case) I fuck something up, I can just roll back the changes with a single command and reboot. It’s awesome. I’ve also used to just test things out, removed all KDE stuff, installed GNOME, tested it out for a while and then did a snapper rollback. The system was just like I hadn’t changed anything. It’s really cool, more distros need this feature.

        • Yer Ma
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          04 months ago

          Wild, every time I’ve tried using it on both metal and as a VM it has self destructed rather quickly. The last few times, just doing an update after the initial install broke the system for various reasons… but everyone has different hardware and software mixes I suppose

    • Séra Balázs
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      24 months ago

      Last time I tried it, the more custom stuff I put on it(custom color scheme, window decorations etc.) the more it fell apart

      • @[email protected]
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        24 months ago

        Admittedly, I haven’t done too much of that, but it might still be more stable than needing to reinstall your OS every 2-3 weeks?

        • Séra Balázs
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          4 months ago

          I’ve done exactly too much of this stuff, and now I can’t stop. Dont let r/unixporn consume you!

    • @Evrala
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      14 months ago

      Just got a new laptop and put an arch flavor on it, keep thinking of going back to Tumbleweed. I’ve kept on Arch derivatives cause of the AUR, but I haven’t actually touched the AUR in a while, and a couple of the things I used the AUR for are now being published as flatpaks by the creators because of the Steam Deck.

  • Justin
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    104 months ago

    Join the NixOS side! I almost never get a broken boot, and if I do, I can always rollback and debug my config when I have time.

    • SamajGaya
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      64 months ago

      Just curious before distro-hopping.

      What functionality does the reproducibility of nixOS serve to a user (like me) with only one desktop. Like I won’t be installing the same system multiple times, I understand the ‘predictable-ness’ of a declarative system. But are there some other advantages?

      • Justin
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        54 months ago

        I find it useful to not have to remember how I set things up when I last touched it months ago. You can do really ricey tweaks if you want to, without worrying about breaking the whole system, or having to set it all up again if you have to reinstall.

        I work in Devops, so being able to track my system in git is insanely useful for maintainability.

        The fact that NixOS has fearless bleeding edge is just a plus; Being able to install the latest packages before Arch even gets them, without worrying if something will break.

      • @[email protected]
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        34 months ago

        Maybe your drive(s) fail and you want to reinstall. Then you already have a setup with all your software and config files installed. Just reinstall NixOS and re-apply your configuration (or build your own Install ISO ).
        And if you ever get a new laptop/desktop/VM/VPS you can do the same.

        Don’t forget to take backups, regardless of your setup tho.

        The reproducibility also leads to some surprise features, like being able to wipe your entire system on every boot. Since NixOS always puts the necessary files in the correct place, this is perfectly fine. If you then add some mechanism to persist specific data across reboots (a separate partition, or the Impermanence module), you will remove all kinda of randomly accumulated files on every boot.

        This means I have very small backups, because I have three kinds of data: stuff that is wiped on every boot, stuff that is persisted but not backed up (/nix/store, all kinds of caches) and stuff that is persisted and backed up (documents, repositories, media).

        None of my OS’s files are in the backups, which makes of them a lot smaller than my previous arch install.

      • @something_random_tho
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        14 months ago

        I installed some broken Nvidia drivers and lost all video out. I rebooted the PC, selected the previous generation, and voila… working PC again. On Arch I’d be debugging it for hours.

        • @Kyouki
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          24 months ago

          Btrfs snapshots and auto snapshots is kind of the same?

          • @Wilzax
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            34 months ago

            NixOS can be managed with Git and you can bring your old environment to a new PC without reloading a full snapshot. Config and data are kept separate when you use Nix to handle the config

            • @Kyouki
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              14 months ago

              Not a developer myself; what benefits does that give me? I know it’s repeatable on different hardware or equal across machines, but wat else would be a win to pick Nix? Immutable so its a pretty static experience?

          • Chewy
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            For most use-cases, yes. I wouldn’t want to use any distro without simple rollback anymore. This boils down to Fedora Atomic, NixOS, or btrfs + any distro.

            • @Kyouki
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              14 months ago

              Agreed. Lifesaver tool many times as a average Linux nerd for about 2-3 years now.

    • Séra Balázs
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      24 months ago

      The „almost” part makes me a bit concerned, but i’m planning to give it a try

      • Justin
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        14 months ago

        I think the only time I’ve broken my boot was when I was messing with the boot settings and set something wrong with luks decryption. I just booted the previous config from the boot list and fixed it, no problem.

    • Hominine
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      24 months ago

      I’m in the middle of nix syntax (nixtax?) and good lord it is quite the learning curve. It has been fun hammering my system back to where it was with Arch though and I’m looking forward to the magical powers that will come with mastering the language.
      Nothing but respect for the community, y’all are something else.

    • Gunpachi
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      14 months ago

      A few days ago I started using NixOS as my daily driver. I am yet to understand how to use home-manager and the nix language but right now I’m good with the main configuration.nix and fleek.

      • Justin
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        14 months ago

        Yeah, I didn’t touch home-manager for a while, it’s not really that important to start using. It’s nice for managing dot files, but the main configuration.nix is much more powerful.

      • Justin
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        14 months ago

        Yup, the official nixos repo is about the same size as the AUR, so you get all the same packages, and they’re usually more up to date.

        The only drawbacks for availability is that writing your own packages is harder, and there are some quirks if you’re trying to use appimages. But overall, really good for daily driving, and it’s really easy to request new packages on the nixpkgs Github if anything is missing.

    • Séra Balázs
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      54 months ago

      I usually just do a full reinstall, it’s faster, requires less storage, and it’s more futureproof. I have my home folder at a different partition, so the files aren’t a problem. Archinstall made this a lot easier, and i love it.

      • @[email protected]
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        34 months ago

        After being with my current distro and install for several years I’ve accumulated so many small changes and tweaks into the system that it’d take ages for me to get back to where I am with a fresh install. Snapper snapshots for life

      • @[email protected]
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        14 months ago

        yeah, separated home folder is also a solution, now, faster than “rpm-ostree reset” or pulling the old snapshot? idk

  • Count Regal Inkwell
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    84 months ago

    It’s the second time sddm broke for me in the space of a week

    I just disabled its service for now and am launching plasma manually.

    Speaking of – Plasma 6 hooray!

  • @AeonFelis
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    84 months ago

    As long as I can get into the terminal I can fix the GUI. What really sucks is when it something that runs in the DM init sequence was using Python but a Python upgrade changed the import path and no it keeps restarting and I need to boot from a USB to disable that service so I can log into something and properly fix it.

    • @adavis
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      54 months ago

      Pass something stupid via your bootloader so it aborts boot and dumps you in an initrd busybox shell. No usb required.

      This was my poor man’s boot environments when I was using zfs on root. I had a pacman hook to snapshot before package transactions, then if it became unbootable I’d interrupt the following boot attempt, edit my grub command line with something wrong so I’d get dumped in the busybox shell, import my zfs pool and roll back before finally rebooting again.

      • @AeonFelis
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        14 months ago

        That’s nice. I’ve later googled it and found out that I could have added 3 to the end of the grub command to make it boot in runlevel 3 which does not trigger the GUI, but I guess your way could also bypass boot issues that prevent even non-gui boot.

        I also see that there is runlevel 1, which is kind of an emergency mode, so maybe that would be the best thing to use?

        • @adavis
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          14 months ago

          Yeah for my case it was easier in the initrd otherwise I’d be trying to roll back the active / partition.

          Re run levels, they were a sysvinit thing so I wasn’t sure sure about systemd, this suggests that would work though https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/SysVinit_to_Systemd_Cheatsheet

          And if you have to bail out even earlier, run level 1 will give you the rescue.target

    • @4RCH_U53R
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      14 months ago

      damn thats oddly specific XD

  • @markus99
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    54 months ago

    Arch neats on suicide watch

  • @Wilzax
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    44 months ago

    Time to switch to NixOS!