• @mipadaitu
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    913 months ago

    This sure sounds like an amazing breakthrough, RNA based vaccine that works on “all strains” of a virus and can be administered with a nasal spray…

    Would be pretty amazing to not have to go get a shot annually, just a quick nose spray once and be done.

    • Bipta
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      963 months ago

      Most promises in medical news, much like energy news, never pan out.

      Here’s to hoping though.

      • @RGB3x3
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        213 months ago

        In medicine, finding out what doesn’t work is nearly as valuable as finding what does. Because finding out why it doesn’t work can lead to you the solution and perhaps even solutions for things you weren’t even looking for.

        • Liz
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          143 months ago

          Yet another reason for journals to have a negative results publication.

        • @[email protected]
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          23 months ago

          finding out what doesn’t work is nearly as valuable as finding what does

          Sometimes, sure. Most of the time, though, it’s more akin to: “Worked on isolated cells in vitro, but doesn’t approach target cells in vivo due to ECM.”

    • @MyDogLovesMe
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      43 months ago

      Ya. Until the kooks decide Bill Gates is resting to install AI in our heads through our noses. …or some such bullshit.

      • @[email protected]
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        73 months ago

        “yah, mom, look I heard right here on Lemmy, Bill Gates is making a nose spray to turn us into robots”

      • @stoly
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        43 months ago

        Apparently people can’t read and for some reason decided that you’re anti vax.

      • @Raxiel
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        43 months ago

        I used windows once, and if you checked inside my head you’d find a neural network.

        • @stoly
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          53 months ago

          You realize that they don’t believe that and are talking about anti vaxxers? People are being very obtuse and uncharitable.

          • @captainlezbian
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            -23 months ago

            Without sarcasm marks or intonation it’s hard to tell the difference between someone pretending to be an idiot and the real deal.

            • @stoly
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              63 months ago

              I’m afraid that this was obvious. People came in wanting to be angry.

              • @captainlezbian
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                -33 months ago

                Obvious to you. I saw it at work where it would be less of an escalation than I wish it would be to my coworkers’ idiocy.

    • @saltesc
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      33 months ago

      I wonder if the lack of a needle suddenly makes some anti-vaxxers less…whatever they are.

      • @Olgratin_Magmatoe
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        33 months ago

        Probably not. At least anecdotally, my anti-vax mom is just as opposed to regular shots as nasal sprays, if not more.

  • @NocturnalMorning
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    403 months ago

    UC Riverside has now been issued a US patent on this RNAi vaccine technology

    Naturally, you’ll want to patent it so you can profit off it instead of just releasing it to benefit all of humanity. Fucking greedy ass people sometimes…

    • @dohpaz42
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      563 months ago

      I do t know UC Riverside’s history for how they manage their patents, but I’m on the side of giving them the benefit of the doubt until proven otherwise. It’s okay to have a patent. It’s ok to profit off an invention you spent a lot of money producing. But what’s not ok would be upping the price so high that people have to choose dying over getting the product because they simply can’t afford it. Let’s hope UC does the former and not the latter.

      • Seraph
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        513 months ago

        Let’s be more clear: IF THEY DONT PATENT IT SOMEONE ELSE WILL.

        UCR is fairly innocuous compared to some alternatives.

        • Carighan Maconar
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          413 months ago

          That’s in fact why some universities patent their research stuff in the first place, to ensure nobody else can. They’ll then make it a policy to take 0€ in licensing fees, but this precludes anybody else from starting to lock the tech behind money.

          Source: My uni back in the days had a few dozen patents for exactly this reason, too.

          • @[email protected]
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            33 months ago

            IANAL but patents rely on originality, meaning a preprint of the original paper is basically enough to make the technology impossible to patent. Well probably more than just the paper I guess.

            • @[email protected]
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              93 months ago

              Not anymore. The US switched from a “first-to-invent” system to a “first-to-file.” Prior art doesn’t matter for shit.

            • @[email protected]
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              53 months ago

              I learned it too that it has to be “new”. Most likely it is a hell of a lot easier to directly patent it and have a strong legal foundation than just wait around and scramble for proof if it needs to be. Probably also helps being picked up by the industry.

          • @stoly
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            13 months ago

            Yep. At max a university will take back its investment amount so that they can operationalize this sort of activity.

      • @NocturnalMorning
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        -33 months ago

        Generally these “patented” products from universities are funded via tax payer money. I am not cool with them profiting off something that is intended to save lives and was also funded by the very people who’s lives will be affected.

        Putting things behind a patent wall only hinders progress.

        • @[email protected]
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          233 months ago

          A patent also ensures no one else can patent it. If they make it affordable and available they are protected from someone else patenting it and then “profitmaxxing” because they have legal recourse to prevent that.

          Of course now it is up to them to do that…

        • @dohpaz42
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          53 months ago

          Public universities receive funding from a multitude of sources. Research is typically funded by grants, which may come from state or federal sources, but they can also come from alumni, fundraising, or charitable trusts.

          Regardless, patents are a necessary part of invention. As others have pointed out, without a patent, what’s to stop some other entity from coming along and (for example) using your hard work to make themselves rich? I’d wager if it were your invention/discovery, you’d want protections too.

          There are some entities out there that would easily abuse patents. But I find it hard to believe a public university would be one of them.

    • @jqubed
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      483 months ago

      Just because it’s patented doesn’t mean it can’t still be released for the benefit of humanity. It does mean it will be harder for some for-profit entity to claim the process for themselves. This may be naive, but I feel like a public (state-owned) nonprofit research university will be a better steward for the patent than a private entity that’s seeking to maximize shareholder value. I would expect that they would either license the patent freely for humanitarian benefit or at a reasonable cost to support the university’s ongoing research efforts.

    • @[email protected]
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      153 months ago

      That’s not how patents work. They have to guard it or else someone else will. You don’t know the university’s goals yet, but you would know the goal of a for profit pharma company.

    • @eran_morad
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      113 months ago

      It’s a fucking nonprofit. Without the royalty stream, shit like this can only be discovered, developed, and brought to market by big pharma. Then what happens?

      • @stoly
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        13 months ago

        You expect too much. They couldn’t see anything beyond their outrage.

    • @stoly
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      33 months ago

      It’s a public institution. They aren’t making a profit on this. They do have a right to control their intellectual property, however.

  • @[email protected]
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    303 months ago

    It will be awesome if this can make it to human trials and be successful. Lots of immunocompromised people could benefit from this.

  • @iAvicenna
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    3 months ago

    Website says

    "Scientists at UC Riverside have demonstrated a new, RNA-based vaccine strategy that is effective against any strain of a virus and can be used safely even by babies or the immunocompromised. "

    Paper says

    “Live-attenuated virus vaccine defective in RNAi suppression induces rapid protection in neonatal and adult mice lacking mature B and T cells”

    I love how they probably used chatgpt to summarize the article for their website. And jumping from here to saying “this vaccine is effective against everything ever” seems a bit! over reaching. Even universal vaccines within a given subtype are finicky. There seems to be a trade off between universality (of recognition) and of effectiveness. Nevertheless this seems like a different mechanism than previous RNA/protein vaccines in that it seems to work by inducing innate immunity. Even though they say that mice remain immune 90d post vaccination, that is another area where mice and men can be substantially different, so I think we are still at the wait and see stage unfortunately.

    And this joke of a sentence here

    "With one vaccine injection, they found the mice were protected from a lethal dose of the unmodified virus for at least 90 days. Note that some studies show nine mouse days are roughly equivalent to one human year. "

    Wohooo we are immune for 10 years!!!

  • @cm0002
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    123 months ago

    Get fucked viruses!

    • Atelopus-zeteki
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      3 months ago

      I can’t seem to find the paper, either. Hmmm… where 'tis? I emailed the article author, Jules Bernstein, to request a link fix. fingers crossed.

      • @Sludgehammer
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        43 months ago

        Link works for me maybe they fixed it?

        If you want to search for it yourself it’s “Live-attenuated virus vaccine defective in RNAi suppression induces rapid protection in neonatal and adult mice lacking mature B and T cells” by Gang Chen, Qingxia Han, Wan-Xiang Li, and Shou-Wei Ding

        • Atelopus-zeteki
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          3 months ago

          Today it worked fine. Could be on my end. VPN, script blockers, etc. shrug

          And WOW this looks like a significant development.

      • @[email protected]
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        33 months ago

        I’m not anti vac. But, this article is pretty smug while still using the word “should”. Hubris is thinking that we’ve beat nature.

        I’m absolutely thrilled if this actually gets us to the next level of protecting people. But I’m beating down by these “savior” articles.