I apologize in advance if meme is insensitive, I keep accidentally implying things that I don’t mean whenever I make posts on the internet

  • @Kyrgizion
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    444 months ago

    If anything, caloric restriction helps you stay alive longer.

    • @[email protected]
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      694 months ago

      there’s a difference between “restricting calories” and “eating so little that you lack almost all the macro/micronutrients necessary for a properly functioning body”

      one can have a calorie restrictive diet and still be eating junk food too

    • @TheSpermWhale
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      44 months ago

      Calories are just a unit of energy - what you consume usually matters more than how many calories you consume

      • @douglasg14b
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        34 months ago

        Yeah but that’s not the point of the comment you’re replying to, which is stating a simple fact that is unchanged despite your argument.

      • @[email protected]
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        74 months ago

        I mean, pizza in and of itself isn’t really unhealthy. I make my own pizza all the time. Eating dominos or any chain pizza spot? Yeah. But a basic tomato sauce, simple dough, cheese, veggie toppings? It’s really not unhealthy. The only thing kinda unhealthy is the cheese.

  • @[email protected]
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    244 months ago

    Some people consider 22:2 or OMAD (one meal a day) intermittent fasting very healthy. Not a whole lot wrong with that, but perhaps not with one meal of fast food a day.

    • @Leviathan
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      234 months ago

      I’ve been doing it since January 2020, which is crazy now that I wrote it down. But I lost 100 pounds that way and I don’t know how to be healthy otherwise. I bike, climb, hike, play in three bands and do a pretty physical job, I often do multiple of those things in a day without issue.

      I don’t know where I was going with this, but I don’t find it to be unhealthy, in fact I feel like I was probably closer to death before.

        • @Leviathan
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          24 months ago

          I highly recommend that when you do you count calories and pair IF with some planned regular light activity. I would go for long walks three or four days a week and that was enough to lose a lot of weight until the gyms opened up post-pandemic.

          • @ManosTheHandsOfFate
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            24 months ago

            I know I can lose weight by counting calories. I can count calories and lose weight eating three meals a day. I’m looking for a way to lose weight without counting calories. I was hoping OMAD would be the ticket.

            • @Leviathan
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              14 months ago

              Unfortunately not for me, but if it might well work out that way for you.

        • @Leviathan
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          24 months ago

          Often, yeah. I always ate fairly healthy but I just have no limit that tells me I’m full so I’d tend to overdo it calorie-wise.

          Mostly I’d say the issue was that being heavier made it hard to be active in general. Mentally and physically exhausting being so heavy and stiff, it was tough to get motivated to get out and do stuff. Now that I’m lighter it’s no sweat without pain.

          I also found out fairly quick once I started working out and counting calories by the gram that my BMR is just trash, I burn very few calories on average.

  • @FrostKing
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    104 months ago

    I’ve started tracking calories recently (more to stop snacking than worry about the calorie count, but that’s a side effect) and it’s really surprised me how many little things have calories that I never thought about. A big one is coffee creamer. Also surprised me how little calories McDonald’s food has

      • @FrostKing
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        24 months ago

        Oh, it’s not little, just less than I expected

    • @[email protected]
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      14 months ago

      McD breakfast is the fastest way I’ve found to get calories on the way to work as I’ve started trying to gain weight recently. I gained 30lbs over the last 6 months just by adding 2 breakfast sandwiches and a short 15m daily workout to my routine. 1100 calories is a lot when you usually eat 0 until after work.

  • @Mango
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    94 months ago

    Calories are those things that are energy. Eat them.

    • @Dabundis
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      84 months ago

      As an optional bonus objective, I heartily recommend getting some vitamins, minerals, proteins, and dietary fiber while you’re at it.

    • @profdc9
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      24 months ago

      Yeah 1 gram of food has 21510516252.4 food calories.

      • @Mango
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        34 months ago

        Yooo that’s that stuff I eat!

  • @[email protected]
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    84 months ago

    I only get hungry once to twice per day, and usually for only about half of a standard restaurant entree amount. Why is that bad for me? I have not been underweight, and I work from home, so I’m not burning a bunch of calories with routine activity.

    I do know I should work out more though.

    • @DillyDaily
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      34 months ago

      It’s not bad for you. There’s a lot of research into portion timing, sizing, and the effect of food quality on health at the same caloric intake, and the inverse.

      Some studies are well funded without bias, some studies have dubious funding bodies, most are too small to be able to read anything much into the results, many use subject diaries and retroactive observations to gather data, which is one of the least reliable ways to collect study data.

      So when you hear people saying “One Meal A Day OMAD is great for your glucose levels” and someone else says “grazing on 7 small meals a day is good for cortisol levels” or whatever they are saying, chances are there is scientific evidence for the claim, but it’s such a minuscule improvement or impact on an individual level, it’s not worth trying to forcefeed yourself more frequent meals, or restrict yourself to less frequent meals - if you already have an intuitive system of eating that let’s you maintain a healthy weight, maintain good nutrition, avoid dietary deficiencies, and feel comfortable after and between meals, then that’s the way you want to be eating for your body. Because it’s sustainable (it’s so easy you do it without even trying) and it works.

      The reality is that humans have only really had this specific lifestyle issue where we simultaneously have a calorie surplus and a movement deficiency for a tiny, almost insignificant slither of our existence as a species. We have to go out of our way to get movement in because desk jobs prohibit it. And sometimes we have to go out of our way to avoid food when we aren’t actually hungry.

      You don’t need to go back far on the human timeline to see that for almost our entire existence as a species it’s been the other way around. Movement is unavoidable, and you must always be seeking food for survival.

      So really, we don’t know what this means going forward, what does “eating for optimal health” looks like in a world where we have highly nutritious fortified foods so we don’t need to eat as many calories to get the same nutrients as our ancestors. We have nearly unlimited calories at our hands for very little physical input from us as an individual, and a daily routine where we need to actively set time aside to exercise and wear buzzing watches to remind ourselves to take a few steps this hour.

      If you are a healthy weight and don’t have any nutritional deficiencies, then I wouldn’t change anything about your eating habits, I’d look into ways to increase NEAT (Non-exercise activity thermogenesis) basically the calories you burn on incidental movement. Small things can add up. We moved the rubbish bin, kettle and phone in the office to the other side of the room so we have to get up and walk across the room to answer the phone or throw away a post it note. It’s added 1000 steps to my day without even having to try, that means I’m closer to my movement goals for the day, and that movement is important. A healthy balance would be increasing your daily NEAT while also doing 10-15 minutes of dedicated cardio a day, increasing to 30 minutes if possible (though the health benefit going from 15 minutes to 30 minutes isn’t as significant as the health benefit you get when going from 0 to 15 minutes cardio. So if aiming for 30 a day burns you out, know that 15 is great too). Adding in strength training a few times a week, noting that training strength is very different from building muscles when it comes to the medical definition of physical fitness.

  • @papalonian
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    84 months ago

    Ayooo it’s me! Skinny af with a garbo diet

    • @johannesvanderwhales
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      124 months ago

      As someone who was always like this, careful, it starts to catch up with you more the older you get

      • @papalonian
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        54 months ago

        Yeah, I’m hitting 30 in a couple years and it’s starting to show. I’ve been working on it, but I’ve had a trash diet since I was a kid so it’s a lot to undo.

      • @Dozzi92
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        24 months ago

        Yep. Was very active all through high school, swimming competitively. Marine Corps after high school til late 20s kept me staying very active. All stopped and the pounds came on slow, but now, a decade later, I realize it’s not so slow and have to dial up fitness and do some food tracking for a bit, before ultimately going back. I love a good cycle.