• @captainlezbian
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    12 days ago

    Higher car theft per capita than Chicago these days. Turns out financial conservatism creates desperate people

  • @Bearlydave
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    22 days ago

    I grew up in Fort McMurray, home of the Canadian oilsands.

    I remember this being a small place and the local newspaper running the story that the place moved from “town” to “City” status.

    In the early 2000s this place boomed. Went from about 35000 population to 90000 (there was talk of about 140000 in the region, many people flying in and working out of campus).

    During this time, we were getting lots of bad press… The media running stories of rampant drugs in the area and that sort of thing. They used footage from outside the seediest bar in town at 3 a.m. of you go to any town or city and hang out at the lowlife bar at 3 a.m. you can claim how horrible the place is. In reality, this place is filled with young working families. Sure, we have some problems but then any place in earth.

    The 2008 financial crisis was kind of a break. By this, I mean that this place was so busy that this slightly impact to the region meant that, for the first time in about 5 years, I had an opportunity to hire some semi-qualified people. In the past 5 years, some of the interviews I had with people (this is for IT jobs) were just ridiculously bad.

    2014 saw the price of oil crash. That definitely slowed things down here, moving it from a boom town to a normal place.

    2016 brought the wildfires. You may have seen it on the news. 88000 people evacuated from the city.

    In 2020, a flood struck our downtown area. Folks from that area were evacuated to other areas.

    Currently, we have another wildfire in the region. About 6000 people are currently evacuated but as I understand it, the fire still a ways away and it has been raining a bit over the last couple of days, so I am not overly concerned for the homes of evacuees.

    So, my home town has gone through lots of chance and challenges over the years. It was built on a real pioneering spirit and I’m proud of the that the people have demonstrated through the hard times.

  • @BonesOfTheMoon
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    12 days ago

    It was kind of a dying former factory small city for a long time, only notable for producing a pair of famous serial killers of all things, and in the last ten years it got an arts centre and suddenly the downtown is thriving. I wouldn’t want to live there again but I’m glad for the city that it has some rejuvenation.

  • @[email protected]
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    32 days ago

    My hometown was in Canada’s top-ten communities in decline for years. These days, it’s got two-thirds the population it used to, the streets are full of deer, and quite a few farmers’ fields have turned into forests. Almost everyone my age that I knew moved away long ago. Going back is always shocking.

  • @[email protected]
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    12 days ago

    Well, they finally finished the shopping center they were building for like 15 years.

    Some company bought some land and had it all setup for construction (giant mounds of red clay and everything). Then they ran out of money. And it sat there for years, visible to everyone who drove by. A few years back, some company bought the and created a shopping center.

  • Justas🇱🇹
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    12 days ago

    Loads of renovated parks and buildings, parts that used to be sketchy have mostly improved, the town center has become richer, while a lot of people who grew up here have moved to the suburbs.

  • @hardcoreufo
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    12 days ago

    In a lot of ways not much. No zoning for mulit unit lots so population probably has stayed about the same. The area around has become a lot more developed with a biotech boom. There used to be a forest across the street and now it’s been turned into a whole foods and business park. The college town nearby has exploded and taken over every square inch in apartments. You can walk around town though and it looks mostly the same but hippies and college professors have been replaced by yuppy tech bro families that like their gardens much more manicured instead of lush and wild.

  • @[email protected]
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    144 days ago

    They have fiber internet now. I grew up offline, had to fight for every improvement from 56k modem to ISDN to DSL. Now their internet is faster than mine.

    • @merari42OP
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      94 days ago

      A village nearby my hometown got fiber for the church and installed directed wifi antennas on the church tower to solve their internet problems

  • @Sausagecat
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    124 days ago

    We got a stop light and the gas station changed families. The stop light took me by surprise and I nearly ran it the first time.

  • Chainweasel
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    94 days ago

    It’s tripled in population. We’re up to about 3,000 people now.

  • @[email protected]
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    74 days ago

    Every small outdoors place I grew up playing in have been razed to build more detached homes.

    The city is originally small, with 2 main roads crossing each other. With all the new influx of people, it is impossible to get out of there in a timely manner by car or bus.

  • Vanth
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    74 days ago

    The main drag didn’t grow with the population, so traffic to get across the city is 10x worse.

    A gay bar shut down for normal, boring business reasons and not because it was hate-crimed like the gay bar that closed when I was a child.

    An attempt was made to make a pedestrian-friendly Entertainment District downtown. They forgot to make any changes to actually encourage and protect pedestrians though. Lots of cute little shops and restaurants packed in an area no one wants to walk through.

    Fiber! And laid by the city so no one company can claim it to form a new monopoly. We have not one but competing fiber providers!

    The football team is still massively popular, despite the golden years being 20+ years ago. So the change is maybe increased desperation intertwined with the neverending optimism that a new golden area is just a season or two out.