• @[email protected]
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    1451 month ago

    There’s an old joke about two mathematicians in a cafe. They’re arguing about whether ordinary people understand basic mathematics. The first mathematician says yes, of course they do! And the second disagrees.

    The second mathematician goes to the toilet, and the first calls over their blonde waitress. He says to her, "in a minute my friend is going to come back from the toilet, and I’m going to ask you a question. I want you to reply, “one third x cubed.'”

    “One ther desque,” she repeats.

    “One third x cubed,” the mathematician tries again.

    “One thir dek scubed.”

    “That’ll do,” he says, and she heads off. The second mathematician returns from the toilet and the first lays him a challenge. “I’ll prove it. I’ll call over that blonde waitress and ask her a simple integration question, and see if she can answer.” The second mathematician agrees, and they call her over.

    “My friend and I have a question,” the first mathematician asks the waitress. “Do you know what is the integral of x squared?”

    “One thir dek scubed,” she answers and the second mathematician is impressed and concedes the point.

    And as she walks away, the waitress calls over her shoulder,

    “Plus a constant.”

    • @nikaaa
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      829 days ago

      I would not consider integration to be basic maths, honestly. Basic maths is addition and multiplication, and maybe vector geometry.

  • @[email protected]
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    1341 month ago

    One of the most useful concepts ever:

    the Curse of Knowledge.

    Explaining something to someone? Zoom out. Back up. What if that person were an alien, how much more context would you need to explain?

    The curse of knowledge is a cognitive bias that occurs when an individual, who is communicating with others, assumes that others have information that is only available to themselves, assuming they all share a background and understanding. This bias is also called by some authors the curse of expertise.

    • @[email protected]
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      491 month ago

      My friend really needs to learn about this. He works for Intel and does some really involved stuff, I on the other hand am a moronic jackass factory worker.

      No friend, I haven’t the slightest idea what you’re trying to tell me you did if you keep using technical terms.

      • @[email protected]
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        151 month ago

        If you said something like “if I were a marketing intern…” or “if I were a college freshman majoring in English, how would you explain it?”

        …would he not know how to clearly communicate still? :)

        Maybe get him with the “is this a curse of knowledge situation?” (along with a link to Wikipedia) heh

        • Ephera
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          1330 days ago

          Problem is, even if they are capable of explaining it, it’s basically our job to learn things 8 hours a day. Trying to catch someone up on that, who doesn’t have that same job, that’s nearly impossible. Well, and you still want to rant/tell about your day for social interaction purposes.

          Like, my mum would also sometimes ask what my (programmer) workday was like and I’d start telling that we had to deploy onto a really old Linux system. Wait hang on, Linux is an operating system. And an operating system is the software that makes computers go. Do you know what “software” is? Hmm, it’s like…
          …And yeah, basically one computer science lecture later, I still haven’t told anything about my workday.

          Sometimes, I can try to leave out such words, like “we had to roll out our software onto a really old computer”, but then I can practically only say “that was really annoying”. To actually explain how I slayed the beast, I do need to explain the scene.

          • @[email protected]
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            830 days ago

            basically one computer science lecture later, I still haven’t told anything about my workday.

            ahaha

            I can try to leave out such words, like “we had to roll out our software onto a really old computer”, but then I can practically only say “that was really annoying”.

            Tough. Try my best with analogies, tailored if possible, but still tough.

            “We had to try to translate our app into a language this ancient computer could understand. It was as easy as suddenly switching to Shakespearean English halfway through this conversation. Or like if you drove your car to a mechanic who’d been cryogenically frozen for the last hundred years. He doth protest much, methinks.

            Overall, it was like putting together a thousand-piece puzzle, except the box came with a million pieces and most of them were useless!”

            Good thing your mom was surely impressed with you all the same 😉

    • @kameecoding
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      441 month ago

      what’s it called when you try to be aware of this and inadvertently say stuff that comes off as condescending, umm, asking for a friend

      • @[email protected]
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        241 month ago

        ooooof

        I know for men who are equal opportunity overexplainers it can still be seen as “mansplaining” when overexplaining to women.

        But in general, if your tone of voice is right and it’s still happening, perhaps communicating your intention and a safeguard would work, at least sometimes?

        May I try to explain this? If I start too basic, and overexplain so it feels condescending, please stop me so I can dig into it more technically.

        • @[email protected]
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          91 month ago

          I’m always worried about inadvertently doing this, so I’ve been trying to make a conscious effort to ask people if they need more context rather than assuming they do or don’t. It’s actually a good approach I think. Although it does depend on whether the person you’re talking to is likely to just say “oh yeah, I know what that is” when they really don’t

          • @[email protected]
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            91 month ago

            I’ve had to train literally hundreds of people over the various jobs I’ve had and it causes me to over explain in almost every conversation.

            I got two tricks to figure out how much someone knows about a topic and encourage them to ask questions rather than lie just to avoid being a little uncomfortable.

            First, I look for them to use vocabulary that I haven’t already mentioned or if they seem to understand something just by using a couple words.

            Second, I ask them to explain something early in the conversation to make it easier to ask if they don’t understand something later. It’s usually really simple, but it really does work to lower communication barriers.

            I like to think it makes us feel more like equals trading expertise, rather than like I’m some authority talking down to them.

            I hope this helps anyone

          • @[email protected]
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            41 month ago

            Yeah that’s good stuff!

            Seems like you have your best shot if you make it seem like a lack of knowledge on a given topic is really safe. “Is this something you’ve nerded out on before, or not yet? Oh you have - cool, it’s pretty esoteric. Do you know enough to summarize it in a sentence or a few? If not I like to try to give my own high level before diving in.”

            Something open ended in there gives you a chance to validate whether the ‘I know what that is’ was ego or truth.

          • @cmfhsu
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            329 days ago

            That’s the ticket, IMO. I start off assuming they know, then pause to ask “are you familiar with x concept?”

            If they say yes and they really mean no, there’s really not a lot I can do. But it seems to make people feel at ease when talking to me - I don’t get called out for over explaining or infantalizing people this way.

      • @[email protected]
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        530 days ago

        If there’s any chance they’ve heard about a concept, I’ll ask if they’ve heard of it and take them at their word (without comment either way).

        And if they’re kinda nodding impatiently, I’ll wrap up the explanation and move on to the deeper level

        At first, people will sometimes be defensive or lie about knowing a topic, but after you establish there’s no judgement either way with you I’ve found people become less hesitant about admitting ignorance and will even want to hear your explanation of something to check their knowledge

        I also do the flip side - I pride myself on admitting when I don’t know something, so that might play in too

    • AFK BRB Chocolate
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      61 month ago

      One of the things I look for in employees is the ability to distill complex topics into the important elements and explain it to someone unfamiliar. Some people are just naturally good at it, and it’s a really important skill for moving up a leadership chain.

    • @[email protected]
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      327 days ago

      Me talking to my dad (who last held the position of professional programmer 30 years ago) about the programming problem I’m working on and vastly overestimating how much he knows about modern software development parlance

    • @Fungah
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      -61 month ago

      But then you’re Mansplaining.

      Even if we have the Patriarchy app4oved mind scanning kits out instructions are to not use them so…I’d hate to accidentally not Mansplain something.

      • @[email protected]
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        21 month ago

        Frustrating!!

        Since there’s no way to fix the incorrect assumptions (a t-shirt proclaiming “I explain granularly to men too!!”?), best bet is probably to get ahead of the assumption with a disclaimer & offer to be receptive to feedback.

        Someone could still be upset I guess but can’t please everyone!

        Discussed a bit below.

  • @SpaceNoodle
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    1261 month ago

    Just yesterday I ran into some chucklehead here on Lemmy that had convinced themselves that the average person would interpret “crypto” to mean SSL rather than cryptocurrency.

    • @Shardikprime
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      441 month ago

      I had one last week here on claiming the average person could feed themselves for years by growing cherry tomatoes from 6 tiny plants. Bro is supposed to be a big-time agricultural bigwig

      • @ChickenLadyLovesLife
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        171 month ago

        Makes sense. Human beings don’t actually need proteins or fats.

      • @[email protected]
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        41 month ago

        Cherry tomatoes are the things you put in a salad at a restaurant to feel healthy, then pick them out once you get back to the table.

        • @Hobo
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          1 month ago

          Look I’m not saying you’re wrong or anything just that I really don’t appreciate you stalking me.

        • Ephera
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          1230 days ago

          Wut? Are we talking about one of those “salads” with mayo, eggs, bacon strips, croutons, sugary dressing and whatnot?

          Because if not, then cherry tomatoes are going to be pretty much the sweetest thing you’ll find for your salad. I’d definitely still call them healthy, but not more so than the other ingredients of a salad…

          • @[email protected]
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            129 days ago

            Yep, that’s pretty much the standard salad where I live. Most people understand that’s not really healthy, but it still feels healthier than bread sticks and butter. The cherry tomatoes are the extra convincing we need to actually call it “healthy”

      • Captain Aggravated
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        229 days ago

        As a small time backyard gardener I can say from experience that 4 plants made more cherry tomatoes than I could reasonably eat. I was giving ziplock bags of cherry tomatoes away to people at work for a couple months. They probably did produce a year’s worth of cherry tomatoes, but they don’t refrigerate or freeze particularly well and they’re not a great choice for making tomato sauce because of their liquid/pulp/skin ratio.

        Similarly I’ve found that I can grow a year’s supply of red pepper flakes with a whopping two cayenne plants. The rate at which I consume red pepper flakes, I’m about out by the time this year’s peppers start ripening.

        I’m able, in my tiny little garden, to grow more of single kinds of foods than I can reasonably eat. I cannot grow enough to sustain my entire diet; I’d need more land than I own to grow grain.

      • @SpaceNoodle
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        230 days ago

        That seems like the opposite problem

    • @[email protected]
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      830 days ago

      I saw that thread, I think. Or the same person in another thread talking about the same thing.

    • Captain Aggravated
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      329 days ago

      You know, I think I agree with the spirit of that assertion but not the letter of that assertion.

      There are people who are kind of at their limit knowing that on your phone there’s a Facebook app, but you have to use your browser and go to the website on a computer. These folks will hear dial tones and TV static in their heads if you say “secure socket layer” to them. These folks have probably also sat through NordVPN ads and heard words like “secure” and “encrypted” used together, and will probably make understandable mistakes like “how’d someone steal bitcoins? I thought it was encrypted?”

  • moosetwin
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    4830 days ago

    It’s insane how close that handwriting is to randall’s, did he make multiple versions of this comic or was this written by a professional forger?

      • Zagorath
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        3030 days ago

        Holy shit. I remembered the original comic, but didn’t remember what the subject matter of it was. So if you hadn’t left this comment, I would have just gone on believing that the OP’s version was Randall’s version.

        • Captain Aggravated
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          529 days ago

          Yeah, I’ve seen people riff on xkcd comics before but they usually do a bad job of matching the handwriting/font (I don’t know if Randall hand-letters these or if he types in a handwritey font). It’s often a deliberately bad job, because indicating that they are changing the original is a part of the message/artistic expression. Like when a word is covered with a black bar with white letters in it in a different font, an obvious revision, it’s like hearing a different voice interrupt.

      • @fidodo
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        1030 days ago

        Wait, that’s actually a great font

    • @[email protected]
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      127 days ago

      There was that one comic that Randall did (Lorenz) where you could choose one of several paths and write your own text in the last panel. In order to implement that Randall had to create a font of his own handwriting. I wouldn’t be surprised if OP just ripped the .woff file or similar.

    • midori
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      161 month ago

      0x900x900x900x900x900x900x900x900x900x90

  • @umbraroze
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    341 month ago

    NOP is $EA, of course, and… um…

    …sorry, I’m just a Commodore 64 scrub, I don’t know nothing about this high and mighty Intel 8086 nonsense.

    [looking up]

    …it’s 0x90 on IA-32? WHAT? Someone told me every processor used 0xEA because that was commonly agreed and readily apparent. …guess I was wrong

    • Flying Squid
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      121 month ago

      My daughter told me the other day, “I bet I could figure out a Commodore 64 if I had one.”

      Good luck figuring out LOAD “*”,8,1 by yourself, kid.

    • palordrolap
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      1 month ago

      Someone told me every processor used 0xEA

      Not sure if this is a riff on the joke or not.

      Back in the day I dabbled in 6510 code, and up until today hadn’t even bothered to look at a chart of opcodes for any of its contemporaries. Today I learned that Z80 uses $00 for NOP.

      Loth as I am to admit it, that actually makes sense. Maybe more sense than 65xx which acts more like a divide-by-zero has happened.

      The rest of the opcode table was full of alien looking mnemonics though, and no undocumented single byte opcodes? Freaky, man.

      But the point is that not even Z80 used $EA. If the someone was real they probably meant every 65xx processor.

        • @LrdThndr
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          329 days ago

          What? This is system programming, not web development.

          • @SpaceNoodle
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            129 days ago

            I was making a joke about their spelling error.

            • @LrdThndr
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              429 days ago

              And I was making a joke about the D&D spider goddess.

              But the word is “loath,” which has an accepted alternate spelling of “loth”. “Lolth” is the Dungeons and Dragons spider goddess, commonly worshiped by Drow.

              • @SpaceNoodle
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                129 days ago

                Oh Christ, I can’t believe I missed that.

                Operating on low sleep and responding before coffee.

                I shall flog myself now

    • idunnololz
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      30 days ago

      I thought NOP was 0x90. Edit: oh I just read the rest of the comment.

  • @NOPper
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    321 month ago

    I feel attacked.

  • Philip
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    311 month ago

    I mean who hasnt watched “Assembly Language in 100 seconds” by Fireship

    • @CallMeButtLove
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      41 month ago

      Just looked this up and subscribed to the channel.

  • @[email protected]
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    2929 days ago

    It still confuses what basic computer skills the average person lacks. Like, how are you even supposed to troubleshoot your computer, if you don’t know the basics about your computer?

    • TheHarpyEagle
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      1029 days ago

      Everyone has a limited time on this earth. Some of us don’t mind or actively enjoy spending that time learning about the technology we use. Others, not so much. I think this comic is really spot on because it’s hard to understand as a tech literate person just how little other people may know. “What browser are you using?” “What’s a browser?”

      The foundational knowledge is not that tough, but when you’re just interested in getting the damn thing to work so you can get on with your life, it’s easy to get frustrated by having to take a crash course on what the hell a BIOS is before you can try to fix it. And when you learn all that just for it to still be broken, patience quickly runs out.

      As long as people have the general understanding that power cycling will solve a good 75% of issues, I’m happy. I hope people give me the same grace when I pay a someone to fix my car or replace my phone screen (I love building computers, but god I hate working on phones).

      • @[email protected]
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        29 days ago

        For the phone bit, I started off with really old smartphones like a Galaxy S1, but basically any old old phones are really built like mini laptops and are usually pretty modular as they weren’t often water resistant or actively anti-repair

        However I fully get your point and fall into the same boat with cars

      • @PM_Your_Nudes_Please
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        929 days ago

        I mean, cars can be demystified the same way computers can: By building and maintaining it yourself. Everyone is afraid to build their first computer, because it seems way too complicated and delicate. Then you actually build your first one, and go “oh hey this actually isn’t so bad after all.”

        Yes, cars (especially modern cars) have a lot more difficult-to-build parts. But modern cars are also a lot like computers in the sense that you don’t need to know every single component on an GPU to be able to install one. You don’t need to be able to build a car part from scratch. The same way you can slot a GPU into a motherboard, you can just buy the entire car part preassembled and bolt it into place. The important part is learning what the different components do, so you can troubleshoot them.

        • @HowManyNimons
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          528 days ago

          Problem is I have zero interest in cars. If I could I’d live car free.

    • @olutukko
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      829 days ago

      you don’t you just call the most technical person you know and ask them to do it

      • @[email protected]
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        629 days ago

        You got a point there. I also regularly forget that you don’t have to know shit about PCs do use windows/Mac.

  • @Atlas_
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    281 month ago

    I mean I’m only missing int3

  • @[email protected]
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    271 month ago

    I recently took a class on ARM assembly, and yet I don’t even know half of these x86 instructions.

          • @[email protected]
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            229 days ago

            Ubi est Quintus? Quintus in Hortus est. Quinte, Quinte, Caecilia clamat. - where is Quintus? Quintus is in the garden. Quintus Quintus shouts Caecilia.

            Those were the First three sentences from my first Latin Book. I still know them.

  • @[email protected]
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    221 month ago

    I’m pretty sure I’ve had this exact conversation. Took me a minute to understand what the point was.