• teft
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      I wonder if the ocean will pay for this one.

    • atocci
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      91 month ago

      That always goes well

    • @Viking_Hippie
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      And then they’re going to have to drive a Chevy there to check if it’s dry…

        • @Viking_Hippie
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          61 month ago

          Discussing imminent mortality is optional, though. Depends on the vibe at the time.

  • @[email protected]
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    821 month ago

    More than two thirds of Florida adults consider climate change a threat to future generations and say state and local governments should do more to address it, according to a poll released Monday by Florida Atlantic University.

    The poll found 68 percent of respondents agreed with the statement that climate change “has them concerned about the well-being of future generations in Florida,” according to a news release from the university. Just 28 percent said state, county and city governments were doing enough to address it. source

    It’s not a self-inflicted wound. I am so tired of this misinformation for the sake of pithy humor. Recognize oppression when you see it or you are on the side of fascism.

    • @Serinus
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      431 month ago

      Yet they’re still voting for Republicans. They’re enabled this.

      • @[email protected]
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        311 month ago

        Yes, because decades of gerrymandering, voter suppression, lobbying, political corruption and misinformation campaigns directed toward one of the most educationally underserved states has absolutely no effect on elections.

        What you are doing is usually termed victim blaming, so careful.

        • @[email protected]
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          201 month ago

          Be careful? Ease off the drama my man.

          77 percent voter turnout and 51 percent voted for Trump. At some point it just becomes a matter of infantalizing people.

          • @Serinus
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            01 month ago

            They’re not even victims yet.

            • @[email protected]
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              1 month ago

              Sadly technically not true! Look into climate gentrification. Because the housing market is prospective in nature, lower-socioeconomic communities at higher elevations more secure from climate change are being displaced by higher costs of living. It’s quite sad and just one part of the iceberg’s tip. :(

      • JJROKCZ
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        91 month ago

        Mostly the Cubans and old folks from other states who move there for their last decade or two of life. The old folks will be dead before it’s a problem, the Cubans refuse to vote for anyone left of hitler because they hate the idea of another people’s revolution taking their ill-gotten wealth, even though todays Cuban Americans aren’t nearly as powerful as the Cubans that the revolution overthrew.

      • @UnderpantsWeevil
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        1 month ago

        they’re still voting for Republicans

        Every time I check the Florida election results its “5-4, Republicans win”. You Floridians need literally one more vote, but those stupid tankie leftists just won’t pitch in.

    • @Marleyinoc
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      401 month ago

      Floridians are still voting Red in droved. Guess something else is more important to them at the polls.

      • @[email protected]
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        1 month ago

        They gotta ban abortion and ‘save’ all the fetuses first so they too can experience the horrors of global warming and climate change under the watchful eye of a theocratic dictatorship.

        • @[email protected]
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          21 month ago

          What n happens when all the fetuses are underwater? Will they save them then, or swim to higher ground?

          • @[email protected]
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            21 month ago

            If I understand their thinking it’d be God who caused the flooding so it’s okay if fetuses die that way. They were probably gay fetuses anyway and their mothers were probably sinners so God drowned them like in Noah’s story.

            Okay I’m done. My brain can’t handle typing anymore of that horrible bullshit.

          • @[email protected]
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            11 month ago

            Don’t you know fetuses float? The tide will bring them to the true believers, just like Moses on the Nile /s

    • @bcgm3
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      261 month ago

      Thanks for posting this. I’ve lived in Florida my whole life, and voted blue-no-matter-who in every election since I was eligible to vote, as do all my friends and family. I try to help others within my sphere of influence to make good political choices, too, and those conversations can be hard. My area has been particularly red for as long as I can remember, and that has only gotten more true in recent years. It often sucks to live here but I am stuck for the foreseeable future, and so I am putting forth the effort to change what I am able.

      As such, I have always found it a bit discouraging that so many seem to think that Florida is some hive-mind phenomenon, wherein every eligible person votes against their own best interests in perfect unison. I mean, a lot of them do, obviously – but the lack of empathy for the rest of us, that’s the weird part to me.

      Also, this got me curious and I looked up how the voter base skews along party lines, the numbers are way closer than I would have guessed.

      • @[email protected]
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        111 month ago

        Thanks for sharing. On the behalf of the rest of the “leftist” internet I’d like to apologize.

        There’s a lot of demented jokes people make about the underserved and oppressed and I try to do my part to counteract it. :)

    • @UnderpantsWeevil
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      -21 month ago

      Recognize oppression when you see it or you are on the side of fascism.

      Nonsense. Florida is part of the freest and fairest democracy in the entire history of the universe. If Floridians wanted to do something about climate change, they would simply vote harder.

  • @someguy3
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    I think if you’re in Florida, sell now and get out (sucks for whoever’s willing to buy). Not just the parts that will be submerged, get out of the whole place because the policies/insurance/laws/taxes are going to go absolutely nuts for the whole state.

    • @3ntranced
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      71 month ago

      My aunt and uncle are buying a house there this year now that the kids are out of the house. We’re already only an hour away from the gulf, not sure what else they’re trying to find.

    • @[email protected]
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      11 month ago

      The poster who posted this is not very smart and is just pushing outrage, like they always do.

      Read the graphic. The light blue is 5m (over 16 feet) and the other blue is 10m (over 32 feet). The estimate rise is about 2 feet in 2100. So not even the first area.

      I hate to downplay the threat of climate change, because it is the biggest existential risk we’ve ever faced, but people like the OP do a disservice to the risk by posting these intentionally misleading graphics. And pushing things like “omg you have to be dumb to buy a place in Florida” (at least based on this graphic) is something that will likely backfire too.

      It’s the same dumb shit that conservatives use to claim that it isn’t an issue because rich people are buying beach front property.

    • @[email protected]
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      161 month ago

      Well of course the rich will leave, then even with the gerrymandering Dems or even progressives can take control, just in time to be blamed like Biden for Trump’s tax hikes (the cuts were permanent for the rich and temporary followed by hikes for us plebs).

  • @[email protected]
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    601 month ago

    Don’t worry, all those people who are going to lose their homes to raising ocean waters can just sell their property.

  • @grenmark
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    451 month ago

    Unfortunately that will flood many of the major cities in Florida, leaving it politically redder…

    • @MehBlah
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      111 month ago

      You really think all those silver hairs will stay. They will infest alabama and it will barely change a shade.

      • @cmbabul
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        51 month ago

        Gulf Shores will be long gone by then too, it’s gonna be some new beach near fucking Dothan

    • @nexguy
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      71 month ago

      The people will float to the top so there will be a delicious blue creame skin to the state.

  • @Glowstick
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    1 month ago

    Sea level rise of 5 meters isn’t happening in any of our lifetimes. Don’t get me wrong, climate change and its resulting sea level rise are very very real, but even the most dire forecasts don’t predict a 5 meter sea level rise in the next 100 years. Models of a high emissions scenario has the rise “only” going up 3.9 meters 126 years from now

    https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-change-global-sea-level

    • @jordanlund
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      541 month ago

      A permanent rise, yes, but storm surges and stuff will make Miami uninhabitable far sooner than that.

      Miami elevation is 6 feet? Something like that?

      • @Glowstick
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        1 month ago

        True, good point, but the general idea still stands. It’s gonna be (I’m totally guessing here) like at least another 70 years before sea level rise + storm flooding events will make inland areas uninhabitable

        • @Serinus
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          151 month ago

          It’ll be within the next ten years that it’ll get hit by a Katrina-like event.

          The models the ICC accepted were all “in line with historical data”. So much so that the “Hot Model Problem” became a known thing, models predicting climate change that were too hot for the ICC to accept.

          Our models are conservative, likely by a good margin.

          • @Glowstick
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            21 month ago

            If you read the link i posted you’ll see the numbers i quoted are already based on the worst case scenario of prediction ranges, rather than the scenario currently considered most likely. And your claim about a katrina level event happening there seems to be pulled out of nowhere, do you have a source citation for that prediction?

    • @someguy3
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      Hurricanes and storms means that you don’t need to wait for the full amount of sea level rise. Insurance is already skyrocketing because of the damage.

    • @UnderpantsWeevil
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      81 month ago

      Sea level rise of 5 meters isn’t happening in any of our lifetimes.

      Report: 500K South Florida Homes at Risk of Storm Surge

      The newly released report highlights the Miami metro area’s mass exposure to coastal flooding risk from hurricanes.

      Often the deadliest element of a hurricane, surge waters from strong storms can rise 15 feet or more above the ordinary sea level, enveloping streets and buildings in coastal areas.

      The report found that roughly 7.7 million homes in hurricane-exposed regions in the U.S. are susceptible to storm surge flooding.

      • @Glowstick
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        -31 month ago

        I mean, that’s interesting info, but none of it refutes what i said

        • @UnderpantsWeevil
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          21 month ago

          storms can rise 15 feet or more above the ordinary sea level

          • @Glowstick
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            51 month ago

            Storm surge levels isn’t the same thing as sea level.

            • @UnderpantsWeevil
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              31 month ago

              Technically correct, but ultimately irrelevant. Storm surge renders properties below the point of sea-rise height uninhabitable. The fact that its temporary doesn’t mitigate the long-term destructive impact it inflicts.

              • @Glowstick
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                1 month ago

                Not irrelevant, it very much depends on the frequency and severity. Katrina Sandy flooded NYC massively, but it’s still extremely inhabited.

            • @[email protected]
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              21 month ago

              I’m sure that’s comforting to the economically underserved that have barriers to contingency plans.

  • @Got_Bent
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    261 month ago

    This can all be avoided with a pallet of paper towels and a sharpie.

    • @ArtVandelay
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      111 month ago

      Just circle the area of the map where you want the climate change to go.

      • HonkyTonkWoman
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        Then plant all the paper towels in a cool, moist, & bright environment. By the next morning, Hillary Clinton will have stolen all your guns.

  • @danc4498
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    141 month ago

    I wonder where the Florida refugees will go…

    • Flying SquidOP
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      291 month ago

      If we get the right person rabbit, they won’t have anywhere to go.

    • @[email protected]
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      121 month ago

      Current models predict that climate displaced people in the US generally are all going to begin moving towards the Great Lakes as the least severely impacted parts of the country. Apparently to Wisconsin in particular since it’s less already inhabited than the rest of the region.

      • @whotookkarl
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        31 month ago

        It gets very cold and snowy in the winters but the northern middle west dodge most of the serious tornadoes to the west and south, no significant risk for hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc. Plus a decent source of fresh water if we can keep it clean and not let corpos take it all for free. And not so close to coastal areas to flood or mountains trapping heat.

      • MeatPilot
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        11 month ago

        deleted by creator

    • @[email protected]
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      21 month ago

      Assuming it’s still there, Disney World. Kinda surprised they haven’t tried to move it elsewhere by now tbh.

  • @normalexit
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    121 month ago

    If we had a functioning government in the US, this could be less of a problem. I wonder how we get one of those?

      • @UnderpantsWeevil
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        -11 month ago

        Checking the election results and they say “5-4 Republicans win”

        • @Wogi
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          31 month ago

          They’re all Republicans, about half of them are fucking insane. The other half just wants to run a nice conservative government. They hate each other and will throw any number of us to the wolves in their spite for each other.

    • @Wogi
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      51 month ago

      Vote for the radical leftists the Republicans have been screaming about.

      When another milquetoast moderate wins anyway, consider alternatives.

    • @[email protected]
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      21 month ago

      I mean Floridians could start mitigating the inevitable effects of climate change themselves. It’s a lot easier to get a functioning state government, they’d just have to vote for Democrats.

  • @brucethemoose
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    Anyone on the florida coast knows it’s not sea rise alone that will get you.

    It’s hurricanes.

    I’m not on the coast, but let me tell you, the existential dread the last few seasons was real (and proven right with Ian), much less this upcoming season.

    Another underappreciated point: most people who live right on the coast now are snowbirds in giant mansions, who can very much afford to lose their vacation home to a hurricane. They don’t even live there most of the time.

    • Flying SquidOP
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      51 month ago

      I have a friend from high school who had a house collapse on her during Hurricane Ivan and she’s on disability for life now.

      And that was before the ocean was anywhere near as hot as it is now.

    • @Veneroso
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      21 month ago

      There’s been talk about a category 6.

      Every year hurricane season starts earlier, they’re bigger, and they go up the coast further.

      • @brucethemoose
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        To be fair, they always seem to hit certainl places in certain months. West coast seems to mostly be later season, around the “I” storms.

        But yeah, not looking forward to this season.

        • @Veneroso
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          The fact that the insurance industry is practically abandoning Florida is a real indicator, despite the noise around it being a hoax.

          We’re just about at the “It exists but it’s too late to do anything about it” stage.

          • @brucethemoose
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            What’s darkly amusing is how climate change is still too “politically sensitive” to talk about, like it’s some big controversial moral argument. Even weather guys talking about hurricane season awkwardly dance around it.

            I understand why, I have family that still thinks its all an anti christian hoax… but still.

  • NutWrench
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    101 month ago

    Sure, you’ve got alligators swimming up to your house now, but just remember that for a brief, shining moment . . . profit was made.