• @bazus1
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    811 month ago

    If he can lay down a four-belt balancer from memory, you are the side hoe to his Factorio addiction.

    • @Alteon
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      331 month ago

      Her: "He’s thinking about other women now…isn’t he?

      Him: “If I rebuilt my rocket control units factory, I could reach a rocket launch every 4 minutes vs 4.5. Then if I optimize my platform in space…”

      • @Eheran
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        111 month ago

        Platform in space? What what what? Is it time to sink another 100 hours?

        • @Alteon
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          191 month ago

          Check out the Space Exploration Mod. The Vanilla game is like the first 10% of the mod. It’s truly a lot. It’s so good that the modder was hired to help make the expansion.

          • Semi-Hemi-Lemmygod
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            281 month ago

            I avoid mods for Factorio because it feels like switching from heroin to fentanyl

            • @Crashumbc
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              91 month ago

              Probably but if you’re getting your high, is it really so wrong?

              :p

            • @Snowclone
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              30 days ago

              All freebasing the dopamine loop. Straight chasing the verisimilitude dragon. Cold bioengineering a 99% pure micro-accomplishment. Dropping into the euphoric liminal pool until immersed in a digital dream you can never fully reach, and never fully escape until you are inevitably forced to surface in the real. Cold and wet with the silt of the riverbed you scream to the Gods ‘‘WHY WON’T YOU KILL ME, I AM, WEAK AND, NUMB AND, INSIGNIFICANT!’’

            • @FordBeeblebrox
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              330 days ago

              I have Factorio and Stellaris in my steam wish list but every time a sale comes up I’m still laying plans for a reactor building or organ “donation” center in Rimworld and realize if I buy more of these I’ll just never sleep or eat again.

              • @bazus1
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                229 days ago

                Factorio has never gone on sale. The price did go up from US$30 to $35 during the worst of the inflation. At some point this year, we’ll get a version 2.0 that massively updates the core game, and has an expansion you can optionally purchase.

    • @Crowfiend
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      81 month ago

      I play Satisfactory instead, but I felt that in my soul.

      • @bazus1
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        229 days ago

        We may pray to different gods, but the factories must grow.

      • @bazus1
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        129 days ago

        Which one? The shortest one with the bump on the side, or the narrow on that is never wider than 8 belts?? Here, let me show yo…. Ohmigawd.

    • @[email protected]
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      229 days ago

      Yeah, my first thought is that the ‘map games’ are the side hoe to my factory game addiction, which is mostly Factorio.

  • @Eheran
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    691 month ago

    Map man map man map map map men men men

      • @Agrivar
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        29 days ago

        I can’t say.

        Maybe people just liked it better that way?

        • @Glytch
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          229 days ago

          Could you take me back to Constantinople?

      • @pyre
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        229 days ago

        i think the city had several names and the official byzantine name was after constantine, it makes sense that after the ottomans took the city they didn’t keep honoring the dude they took it from. they started using other names along with constantine’s, and and eventually this one won out.

        • @pelerinli
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          29 days ago

          Official name of Constantinople was Konstantiniye in Ottoman, just pronounciation of same word.

          And Actually Istanbul is not named by Turks, it is not Turkish. Most believed theory is that when city grew in 18th century, like circles around old city by suburs and outskirts, Greeks among new residents started tlaks about these areas as stampoli (or however it is written in Greek), translate as “stam” means “to” or “near”, “poli” means “city”. And after a while, since population and area of old city became so small in comparison, by 19th century locals from all nation started called city Stampoli or however they can pronounce, such Turks as Istampul. That became İstanbul (easier to say) and it wasn’t until Turkey it was official name.

    • pachrist
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      329 days ago

      But what about Istanbul and Konstantiniyye?

  • @[email protected]
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    431 month ago

    How they hell would anyone not know the difference? It’d be like not knowing the difference between Taylor Swift and Madonna.

    • @[email protected]
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      5430 days ago

      Most people don’t have a clue. I remember mentionning the word byzantine at the dinner table when I was a teenager and was told “you play too many games and read too many books, this is reality, there’s no such thing as a byzantine”.

      When I showed them the wikipedia page about it, “it’s not because it’s on the internet that it’s true”. Yet here we are, in 2024, where they are glued to facebook believing some of the wildest things.

      • @[email protected]
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        1230 days ago

        Yeah, I’ve noticed there’s this weird cross-section of people who ask “do you believe everything you heard on the internet?” about some pretty established facts, and blindly believing Fox News.

        • @Buddahriffic
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          429 days ago

          It’s a logical fallacy, aka a debate trick for stupid people. Appeal to authority (something can’t be true unless it’s said by someone with the authority to be right) plus a claim that source doesn’t have the authority to be right. Another version of this is when someone acts like citations are proof (or a lack of citations is a disproof).

      • @[email protected]
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        830 days ago

        I mean, there was no such thing as a byzantine. That’s a name we came up with in the modern era to help distinguish between “roman” empires.

        • @olafurp
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          930 days ago

          To expand on that it was during the enlightenment in the early renaissance where people had a boner over the Roman Empire but still thought the medieval Roman Empire (Byzantine) to not be cool. So they came up with a new name for it. A declining empire that had a massive beauracracy, spoke Greek and had the wrong brand of Christianity (Orthodox) is not nice enough to create a glorious image like the Pax Romana did.

          This of course made a lot of people upset in the then Ottoman empire since they identified as Romans but were not counted as Romans according to western people. Think “You’re not Romans with a glorious history, you’re Byzantines” even though they clearly were.

          For extra fun the Byzantine/Roman distinction is also unfair.

          • Eastern Rome always spoke Greek, even at 200AD.
          • Orthodox and Catholic were the same pre-schism.
          • During the decline of the Western Empire the capital was moving a lot anyway so “based in Rome” was soon outdated.
          • During the decline Italy was just another province anyway so “based in Italy” was soon outdated.
          • They were literally the same thing except one half managed to fuck their shit up while getting invaded by hordes of tribes at the same time.
          • @VinnyDaCat
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            29 days ago

            invaded by hordes of tribes at the same time.

            Too much treachery. Maybe if they stopped assassinating their rulers and managed their funds better by continuing to properly fund their military and continuing to pay off the tribes they could’ve lasted a bit longer.

            It’s so wild that they survived the Year of the 4 (and 5 and 6) Emperors when you think about it. The entire empire nearly collapses in the third century and what do they do to the man responsible for restoring it? They assassinate him. Or if it’s not the emperor then it’s the head of the military who had been responsible for holding off multiple tribes, negotiating with them and attempting to keep the city of Rome from being ransacked (unsuccessfully). And then you assassinate the emperor responsible and then the new emperor decides to provoke the biggest tribe of them all.

            • @Buddahriffic
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              129 days ago

              Maybe it was a good thing that the Roman Empire collapsed. I just wish it had happened before empowering a cult.

              • @[email protected]
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                129 days ago

                It was. There are no good empires.

                Of course, instead of the Republic reforming you got a thousand years of warlords calling themselves kings, but that’s how it goes when people listen to Popes.

                • @Buddahriffic
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                  129 days ago

                  Yeah, though I’m learning about Japan’s history and, as much as I don’t like how things went in European history, it could have been much worse.

                  Like one big moment for me was when I realized that the whole seppuku ritual thing was actually rational and intended to prevent an even worse outcome.

                  A European King (or church) could only kill so many people even with trials before unrest would start up. A Japanese Lord could just politely request subordinates kill themselves at their earliest convenience.

              • @[email protected]
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                129 days ago

                I didn’t say they were the first!

                There are plenty of cultures that developed systemic racism independently, I don’t want to diminish their shittiness.

              • @PugJesus
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                29 days ago

                Also very curious considering that racism as we would recognize it doesn’t have its seeds planted until the 15th century AD.

            • @olafurp
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              129 days ago

              Humans are pretty racist by default until they realise that everybody is actually also a human being. “Barbarian” is just a different word for “sub-human” that was used back then. Nowadays we use racial/ethnic/religious/housing status or whatever negative term that’s out of the person’s control to justify instead.

              • @Snowclone
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                128 days ago

                What’s fun to me is that Barbarian literally means hairy, referring to cultures that didn’t wear beards as superior

                • @olafurp
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                  128 days ago

                  That’s a common misconception. The word “barba” in Spanish and “barbaroi” in Greek have distinct origin of the gibberish “bar bar bar” which is apparently how all barbarian speak. Here’s an excerpt from Wikipedia page on barbarians under “Etymology”.

                  The Ancient Greek name βάρβαρος (bárbaros) ‘barbarian’ was an antonym for πολίτης (politēs) ‘citizen’, from πόλις (polis) ‘city’. The earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek 𐀞𐀞𐀫, pa-pa-ro, written in Linear B syllabic script.

                  The Greeks used the term barbarian for all non-Greek-speaking people, including the Egyptians, Persians, Medes and Phoenicians, emphasizing their otherness. According to Greek writers, this was because the language they spoke sounded to Greeks like gibberish represented by the sounds “bar…bar…;” the alleged root of the word bárbaros, which is an echomimetic or onomatopoeic word. In various occasions, the term was also used by Greeks, especially the Athenians, to deride other Greek tribes and states (such as Epirotes, Eleans, Boeotians and Aeolic-speakers) and also fellow Athenians in a pejorative and politically motivated manner. The term also carried a cultural dimension to its dual meaning. The verb βαρβαρίζω (barbarízō) in ancient Greek meant to behave or talk like a barbarian, or to hold with the barbarians.

      • Echo Dot
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        330 days ago

        Well clearly the Earth is flat because here’s a picture of some water reflecting off a puddle, and that totally proves it apparently.

    • @Snowclone
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      1830 days ago

      Yeah, it’s a pivotol part of European history that has ramifications to the present day. It’s like not knowing the difference between England and a second thing.

      • Echo Dot
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        1030 days ago

        As a high school graduate I can totally tell you the history of Europe.

        So first it was 1066, then the Victorians, then the second world war, then it was now. That’s it, all of European history. Now perhaps some Americans think another historically important event occurred, but it can’t have, because no one mentioned it.

        • @FordBeeblebrox
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          530 days ago

          I think some other stuff may have happened, but none of it was really oil/freedom related so we learned about confederate generals and Mormon pioneer history instead.

        • @[email protected]
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          030 days ago

          And the scariest part about history I learned in school is that the Vikings always took over the world because they don’t need a Cassus Belli.

    • @[email protected]
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      71 month ago

      I know I learned about them twenty years ago but I don’t recall anything about either of them anymore, so that’s how I can’t know the difference anyway.

      • @Snowclone
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        530 days ago

        It helps that They Might Be Giants wrote a song about it. Constantinople was the capital of what we now call "The Byzantine Empire’’ (at the time they just called it ‘The Roman Empire’) Istanbul was the capital of The Ottoman Empire. And as everyone knows. Istanbul was once Constantinople.

  • Pleb
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    341 month ago

    I know what the difference is and don’t play those map video games.

    But I do like shoving little soldiers around the table top. And the only thing historic about those is that most of them are no longer being produced.

      • Pleb
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        1 month ago

        The most hardcore “map game” I’m playing is Total War (Warhammer these days). I do love me some Starcraft though.

        • I Cast Fist
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          41 month ago

          I do think that counts. Medieval 2 had both byzantines and turks in almost perfectly opposite colors, purple vs green

          • Pleb
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            31 month ago

            Oh right, there was that one also. Somehow completely forgot about Medieval 2 (was more of a Rome player).

            But my knowledge of their existence comes more from the fact that I was dumb enough to take Latin in school. We had to translate letters by the German ambassador (Busbecq) to the Ottoman Empire from when he was sent to Byzantium Constantinople Kostantiniyye Istanbul (the wiki-article about the names of the city alone is fascinating).

        • @[email protected]
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          30 days ago

          Hoi4 Black Ice?

          While I love the Total War combo of strategic map play + in the field tactical control, I think there are a good deal of map games even more technically complex, but they are incredibly niche.

          Starcraft is an RTS with no real grand strategy, I don’t think that counts as a ‘map game’.

          • Pleb
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            230 days ago

            I know that they are quite different, my point was that I don’t play those more complex games and usually prefer other genres. StarCraft was an example of that while limiting it to the Strategy genre as a whole.

            • @[email protected]
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              30 days ago

              Sorry, I didn’t fully read all of the comments you’d made before, and my inner nerdsplaining came out.

              That and I’ve been awake for… 36 hours now? Hooray for incredible pain.

              That being said, StarCraft is great!

              • Pleb
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                230 days ago

                Oh, I was just answering the comment, didn’t realize I made the “limiting to strategy as a whole” remark in a different one.

                Well, after 36 hours it’s well about time to finally get some sleep.

    • @ChicoSuave
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      61 month ago

      Big maps, little movement, lots of stuff to track; Hearts Of Iron is made for folks like you and me.

      • Pleb
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        01 month ago

        Nah, a 4’x6’ table is a big enough map for me most days.
        I’m more of a Total War gamer than something like Heart of Iron anyways. Or better yet: some good old Starcraft, if we limit it to strategy alone.

      • @[email protected]
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        Ottoman’s get free unit production with military schools as well as faster production in blacksmith influence. Also producing units and ageing up gives your expirence towards vizier points, which can unlock special bonis.

        The Byzantines get the cistern system which increases gathering rate and can be toogled to eithe faster production or research speed. On top of that they get an additional resource, olive oil which they passivly produce from food gathering and can be used to purchase mercenary units from other factions.

        • Zagorath
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          329 days ago

          Hells yeah AoE4! I’ve been a Byzantines main since they released that civ as an option. Love the cistern & aqueduct system.

          But I think the above commenter was referencing tabletop wargaming, not RTS.

      • Pleb
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        330 days ago

        The difference between what?

        Those map games and shoving little plastic soldiers over the table top?
        Those map games are huge, having many armies on the map and managing your state. While shoving soldiers over the table top usually just involves your one army with no state management at all and the map just consisting of the game you are playing.

        • @[email protected]
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          130 days ago

          Our context is the tweet in the post and that mentions the difference between the Ottoman and Byzantine empires.

          • Pleb
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            230 days ago

            The context is also my comment you replied to. Didn’t know what difference you meant.

            To make it simple: the Orthodox Christian Byzantine Empire was the eastern Roman Empire that continued on after the western Roman Empire went under.

            The Ottoman Empire is the Muslim Empire that took over after the Byzantine Empire got conquered.

  • @Spesknight
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    3130 days ago

    Just paint a map on your skin and ask “conquer me”…

  • @[email protected]
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    211 month ago

    It is ABSURD how long Turkey’s focus tree takes in HOI4 unless you’re okay with making Ataturk cry.

    And how could you be?

    • Cethin
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      1430 days ago

      It’s probably called a GSG (Grand Strategy Game). Almost all “map painting simulators” are GSGs.

    • Zagorath
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      929 days ago

      Pretty sure they’re talking about something more like Crusader Kings or Europa Universalis than Age of Empires.

    • @olutukko
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      530 days ago

      unless it’s civ which is turn based

      • @Agent641
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        430 days ago

        I wonder what RTS Civ would be like 🤔

          • Zagorath
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            229 days ago

            Civ is prehistory to futuristic. AoE2 is mediaeval.

            Empire Earth or Rise of Nations would be a better answer to @[email protected]’s question.

            • @nyctre
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              29 days ago

              Fuck yeah, loved both of those. Especially empire earth. Great campaign.

              • Zagorath
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                129 days ago

                I’ve never actually played them. Would love to try them out, but I’m afraid they’d be too dated. Would love to see them get a Definitive Edition similar to what Age of Empires has received.

                • @nyctre
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                  229 days ago

                  I’ve got empire earth gold on gog. It’s an old game, with old graphics, but it’s still fine, tbh. Gameplay-wise it’s pretty timeless, imo.

    • @olafurp
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      730 days ago

      Not in all of Europe, they completely ignored everything west of Germany in the medieval period here.

      • @nyctre
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        529 days ago

        But both are east of Germany, so why are they ignored? Or did you mean that they only focused on stuff that happened west of Germany?

        • @olafurp
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          429 days ago

          Yeah, could have written that clearer I suppose. China only started existing during the rise of communism for example.

      • Hossenfeffer
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        329 days ago

        Whereas they ignored everything East of France over here.

        Actually, I went to school in Scotland so our teachers also tried to ignore everything south of the border too.

        • @olafurp
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          429 days ago

          “Today we’ll learn about the Picts”. I went to school in Iceland, they taught us a lot of Icelandic history and only allocated one week to 600 years of legalised slavery.

          People were not property in Iceland, but, if you didn’t have enough land to support something like 3 cows you were forced to go into service of a farmer for a year. During that year you could leave and die, go to another farm and hope they have food for you or die or swap and get beaten up for not working all waking hours and only maybe die.

          The church backed the people up when Iceland was Catholic but with protestantism land was transferred to Denmark and then leased to the farm-archy (agrarchy?).

          Iceland was poorer than Romania 120 years ago because fishing villages were illegal. All fishing was property of the farmer that was the current master of the person. They also made law that banned people from getting married without permission of the farmer and supposedly there was a lot of gay sex back then.

          I found out about this when I was 30 lol.

    • @blazeknave
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      129 days ago

      Adjacent. Pivotal difference is not turn based.

  • @nyctre
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    1029 days ago

    It does not. Why do you think all the rich people resort to drugs and shit? They’re just chasing that dragon because they’ve forgotten what it’s all about.

  • @Okokimup
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    101 month ago

    OK, now I understand that Yeah Yeah Yeahs song.