Give us the cheat codes to your industry/place of work!

  • @Sheldybear
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    114 days ago

    I’m in the museum sector.

    Never pick something up to move it until you’ve seen the place where you’re moving the thing and it’s clear of junk.

    It’s safer to make two trips instead of one. It’s safer to make three trips instead of two.

    The best thing you can do for something old that looks like it’s slowly falling apart is usually to leave it alone.

  • Maple Engineer
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    5 days ago

    I work in information security.

    Don’t use biometrics to secure your devices. Biometrics are a convenience feature to make it easier to access your device. Biometrics are NOT security. You can be compelled to unlock your device by having it pointed at your face or your finger forced onto the reader. Don’t do it.

    Use 2FA/MFA everywhere you can. If it’s an option, turn it on.

    Use a password manager that generates strong passwords and use a different password for every service you use.

    Update, update, update. Allow your devices, OSes, and software/applications to update automatically.

    Talk to your parents about safe surfing. Tell them that their bank won’t send them an email or text asking them to send personal information. Set a password with your family to identify them if they are in trouble and need help. Tell parents and grandparent not to send you bail money to get you out of jail in Morocco.

    Teach your kids that everything they post on the internet is public and permanent. Teach them that if they do something that they think will get them in trouble and someone is blackmailing them that it’s better to tell you and ask for help than to give in to the blackmailers.

    • @CoggyMcFee
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      4 days ago

      Regarding biometrics, I’ve felt that one advantage is that if I’m in a public space, I don’t have to worry about someone watching me enter my password over my shoulder. If I got into a situation where someone is physically overpowering me to get my finger onto my device against my will, I’m probably going to give them whatever password they want so I don’t get a beat down.

      • Maple Engineer
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        4 days ago

        That’s a threat and risk assessment. You’ve decided you’re willing to accept the risk of anyone being able to unlock your phone. For me, I’m not really worried about someone in the street strong arming me. I’m more worried about a state actor, border guard, police officer, etc demanding that I unlock my phone. They can physically compel you to unlock your phone by pointing it at your face or putting your finger on the pad but they cannot compel you to give them your password.

        • @chasingtheflow
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          4 days ago

          I’m probably preaching to the choir, but for those who don’t know, at least on an iPhone and I’m sure android has something similar, if you foresee the situation coming you can just hold the sleep/wake button for a few seconds (even while your phone is in your pocket) and it will require the passcode and not allow biometrics.

          Edit: my memory, it’s the sleep/wake button and volume down. Similar to android as per the below.

          • @MIDItheKID
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            44 days ago

            For android it’s power+volume up to bring up the power options menu (shutdown, restart, etc) and there is a “lock down” option that disables biometric unlock.

            Wish I could do it with one hand, but good to know it’s there.

        • @CoggyMcFee
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          44 days ago

          I definitely see your perspective, but mostly wanted to make sure I wasn’t overlooking some obvious downside in my risk assessment.

          I figure my chances are low that I will get into the situation where an authority demands access to my phone but I also don’t have the opportunity to lock out biometrics. Like if I get pulled over I just hold power and volume up buttons for three seconds and biometrics is off. That said, it certainly doesn’t eliminate my risk completely, and I wouldn’t consider anyone crazy for just opting out completely.

          • Maple Engineer
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            74 days ago

            The other problem with biometrics is you can’t change them. With the OPM breach a few years ago they lost 5.6 million finger prints. Those finger prints are now useless since they are in the wild and can’t be changed. Not a problem for your average phone user but in my world that’s a really big deal. In my world biometrics are a convenience and convenience is bad for security.

            As long as you’ve considered and accepted the risks you’re good.

              • Maple Engineer
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                14 days ago

                Can I use my dick head?

                “You want me to unlock my phone? I used the head of my erect penis. I’m not going to get it up myself. Knock yourself the fuck out.”

    • morriscox
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      105 days ago

      Allowing apps to update automatically often means that advertising and feature removal or nerfing, etc., can happen. Checking manually has saved me a lot of grief.

      • Maple Engineer
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        95 days ago

        That’s my expert opinion. Take it or leave it. It’s your device.

        • Zoot
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          05 days ago

          In this day and age where updating an app means losing half the functionality, no thanks. Would love a way around that though!

          • Maple Engineer
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            85 days ago

            You’re exposing yourself to unpatched vulnerabilities for convenience instead of updating or deleting the app. If you lose half the functionality because of an update it’s time to find a new app in my books.

              • Maple Engineer
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                14 days ago

                You’ve done a threat and risk assessment and decided that the inconvenience of uninstalling or disabling the app is with accepting the risk of your device being competing and your data stolen or ransomed, your banking or other credentials being stolen, your friends, family, and other contacts being targeted, and your employer being put at risk if you use your device for work. That’s an acceptable way of handling the situation. You can always accept the risk.

          • @brygphilomena
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            24 days ago

            I’ve heard this sentiment for almost 20 years. “The app works fine, why update, it only breaks things.”

            Then they blame me when it starts being incompatible with the current OS or some other application. Even if the only fix is to update they still resist or refuse outright.

      • @[email protected]
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        44 days ago

        I finally let my phone do some app updates the other week, my banking app now displays full screen ads for their credit cards, conveniently right as you go to click the transfer button.

        I don’t update shit anymore. I update my OS and apps on my desktop, but my phone is now being actively neglected in regards to app updates. Every single app update breaks something, removes a feature, or brings ads into the picture.

      • Maple Engineer
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        95 days ago

        Yup. Also having an agreement that an X from any family member means they are uncomfortable or in trouble and you should call them in one minute, tell them that there is an emergency, and you need to pick them up right now. Get them safe and don’t ask questions unless they want to talk.

  • @[email protected]
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    1206 days ago

    I’m a truck driver.

    • You are far safer behind me than in front of me. It can take me over two US football fields (200 yards or roughly 180 meters) to come to a full stop and it takes more distance if my trailer is empty. The average car can stop in half that distance. Most cars turn into tin cans when hit by a rig at 25 mph.
    • If you see a number of trucks all moving into the same lane, might consider getting in the same lane, behind us. Odds are pretty good we either saw something in the lane ahead or we heard about something over the CB.
    • I can see you playing on your phone while driving. Cops in some states have been known to hitch rides with truck drivers in order to catch distracted drivers.
    • Learn zipper merging!
    • @Ensign_Crab
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      336 days ago

      it takes more distance if my trailer is empty

      This seems counterintuitive. I would love to hear why.

      • @[email protected]
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        685 days ago

        Most of a tractor-trailer’s stopping power is split between the trailer brakes and the tractor’s drive tandems. If there is not enough weight on those axles, the tires can’t grip the pavement properly. If I apply too much power to the brakes the wheels can start bouncing or just lock up and start skidding if the ABS system is acting up.

        Most tractor-trailers you see on the road in the US are designed to weigh 60,000 to 80,000 lbs (~ 27,000 - 36,000 kg). For comparison, a Honda Civic weighs roughly 3,000 lbs (1360 kg). Every system on the truck is designed around moving that amount of mass safely. With an empty dry van trailer your looking at closer to 30,000 lbs (~ 13,000 kg). Makes a difference in performance. Ride is rougher, takes longer to stop.

        • @Ensign_Crab
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          175 days ago

          Thank you. That’s fascinating.

        • @KISSmyOSFeddit
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          45 days ago

          In the age of computer-controlled ABS and brake assistance systems, that just sounds like poor programming.
          There’s no reason why the computer shouldn’t be able to take current weight into account and deliver more braking power to the tractor when the trailer is empty.

        • @[email protected]
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          14 days ago

          Sounds like you’re talking about icy or wet roads. I’ve never had a trailer do that on dry pavement and I can definitely stop faster emptying than full.

          • @[email protected]
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            14 days ago

            I really wish that were entirely the case. The distances I quoted came from safety trainings I’ve had to take over the years. Given my personal experiences during that time, I think they were from before ABS was mandated. And I had a lot of ABS failures when I was OTR and few close calls as a result of those failures. That’s one of the reasons I chose to switch to running a yard truck 5 years ago. Far less stress.

            When ABS failed on dry pavement and I needed to stop in a hurry, the affected tandem would tend to lock up and bounce along the ground. Nerve racking and scary when there’s traffic in front of you, but not near as bad as on wet or icy roads. The sheer terror of feeling one of my axles start sliding under me.

            If I had one word of advice for drivers new to the industry, it would be to drive as if none of the safety systems on the truck and trailer exist because in my experience they will fail exactly when you need them.

            But when they do work they are f-ing magical.