• @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    English
    36
    edit-2
    2 days ago

    I’m pretty done with English speakers trying to shame other languages.

    Go verb some nouns, English. You are drunk.

    • @HauntedCupcake
      link
      English
      62 days ago

      Is there anything wrong with the statement? Is there a misconception of how Spanish works?

      I literally don’t know enough about Spanish to know either way or what the correct translation should be

      • @sibannac
        link
        English
        42 days ago

        If someone identifies as non-binary they would be neither male or female in how you address them, at least in english. In Spanish “non-binary” doesn’t translate to a neuter equivalent because the gender of a word matters in the context of who you are addressing.

        I am not a native or proficient speaker of Spanish, so I could be off.

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    242 days ago

    isn’t the generally accepted solution to this just “-e”? like “no binarie”, or “latine”

    i feel like this is a bit of a trend, there’s a pretty decent solution that mostly works with existing grammar and for some reason you don’t really see anyone using it…

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      332 days ago

      Spanish speaker here. It’s kinda an ongoing issue. Non binary people in most of South America did already used that as solution problem is that Spanish is used with generes for a lot of things even objects that do not really have a gender.
      So as a start it sounds weird and sometimes you have to do a double take to understand what was said. Another issue is that gramatically there are words that end in e and are gendered for man ex: “Presidente” is used for male president and “Presidenta” for female president. Admittedly those are few cases and some argue that they where originally non gendered or are loan words that are non gendered. But still it’s not resolved Now this next point is mostly my observation you can take it as you’d like, the community handled this awkwardly and it kinda became a fad from 2014 now somehow out of taste for some. Some tried to impose it onto everyone as the.morally correct choice, and some seemed to use it as a form of rebel, I.think it was very badly received as a whole. My obvservations ending there reality is that there’s very little open discussion about it like it was a fad (also right wing government winning in 2015 doesn’t help) but non binary people is still very much there and still no better understood.
      Right now seems that the genderless e use is still used as “an inside dialect” for some but when interacting with people outside of the queer comunity they go with old gender rules. Some others do use pronouns and gender alternatively. But definitely there is no consensus and little open talk.

      • @joel_feila
        link
        72 days ago

        Ah yes grammatical gender and lexical gender butting heads

      • @StaySquared
        link
        -92 days ago

        IT. DOESN’T. WORK.

        The English language is a chit tier language. That’s a fact.

        It doesn’t work for ANY LATIN language. Not Spanish, not Italian, not French, not Romanian, nor Portuguese.

    • Basso Daniele
      link
      fedilink
      22 days ago

      Generally this works with Spanish. But other Latin languages like Italian cannot have this option: so we have to use tricks like tuttə for anyone or others escamotages

      • @StaySquared
        link
        7
        edit-2
        2 days ago

        LatinX doesn’t work in Spanish. And Latinos fkin hate anyone entertaining this idiocy.

        It doesn’t work for ANY LATIN language. Not Spanish, not Italian, not French, not Romanian, nor Portuguese.

        Now have fun with that as you travel more East and South.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        12 days ago

        Only in written language though, as the schwa can’t really be pronounced. I guess the way is to simply use both verbally (“tutti e tutte”), even though it’s not really necessary as “tutti” already includes - well - everyone (incl. non binary people).

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    1393 days ago

    A bit ignorant take. Grammatical gender does not always imply the actual gender of the subject, and Spanish can easily form gender neutral-nouns or sentences. For example: “persona no binaria” is entirely made with “feminine” words, but it’s meaning (non-binary person) is entirely gender-neutral.

    This is also why most Spanish speakers make fun of anglophones who use “latix”. It’s embarrassing, condescending and completely unnecessary, it shows a lack of understanding of how Spanish is actually used by it’s speakers

    Here’s another common way to make gender-neutral Spanish, while making it explicit:

    Take the sentence “The workers are radicalizing.” Workers is “Trabajadores” a masculine-plural word. The Royal Academy of Spanish Language, clarifies that the maculine form of any noun includes participants of any gender, so to say “Los Trabajadores se están radicalizando” would be grammatically correct, and no Spanish speaker would really asume you only have male workers. However, to make inclusion more explicit, it isn’t uncommon for companies to use double articles: “Las y los trabajadores se están radicalizando.” Notice that the noun has remained in masculine form, instead the articles have been used to make it explicit that the writer does see gender as a binary. You would see this in office-settings, but as you can hopefully see. Doing it like this actually reinforces the binary perspective, rather than the other way around.

    TL&DR: Use “Latino/a” or “Hispanic”, instead of “Latix” if you don’t want your maid and gardener to laugh their asses off at your expense. Also, all words in Spanish have gender, that doesn’t mean all people have to as well.

    • BigFig
      link
      English
      643 days ago

      Hispanic here, absolutely hate Latinx, feels like a term made by English speakers on behalf of us for “inclusivity”

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        English
        373 days ago

        It’s not though. That’s a myth. It was created by latine nonbinary math nerds on old internet message boards. Since they were math nerds, they used x to represent a variable that could be anything. They only designed it for use on message boards, they never thought about how to pronounce it. You’re allowed to think those latine geeks did a bad job, but calling them English speakers is factually incorrect.

      • @StaySquared
        link
        -202 days ago

        I literally dislike leftists just for the fact that they tried to fk with my Latino culture with their degeneracy.

        • @Emerald
          link
          9
          edit-2
          2 days ago

          They aren’t trying to mess with the culture for “degeneracy”. They were well meaning when making the Latinx term, it just happens that everyone seems to hate it.

          • @StaySquared
            link
            -13
            edit-2
            2 days ago

            We were in Afghanistan trying to change their diet (promoting soy products), $34M down the drain. And the U.S.-Afghanistan Education Collaboration was nothing more than to bring Western degeneracy to the female’s education system. Hence why the Taliban temporarily banned females from going to school until they cleaned up the filth that America attempted to implement into their education system.

            Where ever Western world powers go, they bring degeneracy (democracy) with them, by force.

            In the future, the Global South will give the Western World a big middle finger for what has been done to them all in the name of democracy.

            • htrayl
              link
              72 days ago

              Soybeans are an excellent crop for increasing protein, and one we know well. Malnutrition is a huge issue in Afghanistan - cultural considerations are fundamentally a secondary issue to starving children.

              And please, take some time to expand on what filth the US was teaching girls. Let me guess, anything non-religous that teaches them that they have more value beyong their sex and ability to produce children?

              And please, describe how the Taliban has successfully reimplemented any liberal, STEM, or non-religous instruction.

              • @StaySquared
                link
                -11 day ago

                $34M would have been best used for things like animal husbandry and keeping their cultural diet intact instead of trying to make them ingest something foreign to them.

                I think you should take the time to check how many universities exist in Afghanistan and the fact that… GASP! There’s female politicians, scientists, doctors, surgeons, teachers, etc… etc… etc…

                Good little liberal, typical racist ignorant bs. That’s one thing you liberals have in common with the low IQ conservatives… your ignorance shines brighter than the sun.

        • BigFig
          link
          English
          -32 days ago

          Latinos fucked their own culture with machismo bullshit

          • @StaySquared
            link
            -12 days ago

            And the White liberals are here to save them from their own culture, right?

            • @Shardikprime
              link
              -52 days ago

              Yeah, that’s the burden of the enlightened

      • @MolochAlter
        link
        -93 days ago

        feels like

        That’s exactly what it is, so that’s an accurate feeling.

    • I Cast Fist
      link
      fedilink
      92 days ago

      The irony is that in wanting to include their variable/neutral gender via x or @ instead of ‘o’ or ‘a’, people that use screen readers usually get excluded, as the programs don’t recognize “latinx” or “latin@” - same applies to Portuguese

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      English
      273 days ago

      I’ve seen latine used by some Spanish speakers. It seems like opinions are certainly more positive about it than Latinx, but that’s a low bar

      • @skyspydude1
        link
        313 days ago

        Latine is at least pronounceable, and doesn’t sound like you’re describing your former spouse from South America.

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      193 days ago

      Even as a boy in latinamerica I found strange that my cousins where “las primitas” when I was not included and “los primitos” when I was. Like, what gave me so much power to change the gender of a group of 9 girls? Anyway, since 2005 or so, my small communist mailing group was discussing the way we use gendered words, being influenced by Spanish feminist groups. We were like 10 guys and a woman on the mailing list, and after a lot of discussion we decided to start using feminine gender for everything, given that “nobody” care.

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      83 days ago

      Similar issue in Italian. Neutral gender in Latin consolidated in the male gender. It is what it is. There are some English-speakers who have really hard time to understand that different languages work in different ways, somehow.

      That said, there are discussions about using both articles or more weird stuff like “*” or even the Ə character to replace the ending, which most people are not used to yet, though.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        English
        -13 days ago

        It is what it is

        Yet that does not logically imply that it is as it should be. And if it should be as it isn’t, then the fact that it is what it is tells us that it should be improved.

        • I Cast Fist
          link
          fedilink
          42 days ago

          Doesn’t mean the current attempt is actually doing a good job at improving the situation, tho

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            English
            -22 days ago

            The current attempt is Latine. What’s wrong with E? I thought everyone generally liked it.

            • I Cast Fist
              link
              fedilink
              72 days ago

              You still have to deal with the “el/los” and “la/las”, because that depends on the word’s gender. Should it be “el latine” or “la latine”? Invent le/les to comply? And when it comes to quantity, un latino, una latina, uns latinos, unas latinas, un(?) latine?

              • @[email protected]
                link
                fedilink
                02 days ago

                Proposal: either smoosh them together (eg: ella / loas) which preserves the historical gendering of the language while creating a non gendered article Or Create a separate non gendered article that can be used

                Language is made up by and for the speakers of the language. Rules of grammar are not actually rules but just what the collective speakers generally agree upon.

                • Good Girl [she/they]
                  link
                  fedilink
                  4
                  edit-2
                  2 days ago

                  Proposal: either smoosh them together (eg: ella / loas)

                  As neat as that’d be, ella ([ɛlə] not [ɛjə]) was already a word and got shortened to la.

                  As in ella agua, ella manzana, ella persona.

                  Not to say we can’t repurpose things, but it was already a preexisting feminine word.

              • @[email protected]
                link
                fedilink
                English
                -12 days ago

                I dunno but those all sound like solvable problems and I think latine enbies will do great at solving them as long as latine binaries listen to them instead of calling the enbies anglos.

                • I Cast Fist
                  link
                  fedilink
                  62 days ago

                  Any linguistic problem is technically solvable, just invent new words, add more rules and call it a day, you can do that for any language. Getting people that grew up and have used it for decades to accept is one hell of an uphill battle, especially as many will say the changes “are making up words to please half a dozen people”

        • @[email protected]
          link
          fedilink
          4
          edit-2
          3 days ago

          Sure, but my point is:

          • there is no point to overcharge with moral meaning what is a linguistic process (well understood I would add) that happened over centuries. This particular phenomenon has to do with the optimization of the language (neutral in Latin had relatively few nouns for objects) and the loss of consonants at the end of the world (like -m) that were often not pronounced anyway in the spoken language already - so again simplification. It has to do with a moral stance not more than other linguistic phenomena that caused mutations in consonants etc.
          • changing the language is responsibility of the speakers, not of English-speakers that in addition to have language hegemony, pretend to change other languages they don’t speak, mirroring English’s quirks and working mechanisms.

          In fact, what I mentioned above (about * and the schwa) are processes that exist among speakers to address what some perceive as a problem in the language. However this is something that for obvious reasons only applies to written language as both of them are not pronounceable.

          Different languages also have a different prescriptive vs descriptive balance, hence changes happen differently.

          You simply can’t transport English “solutions” to problems (I.e. neutral words) to Spanish (or Italian), because neutral for this language is the same as masculine. However, for speakers, gender is not perceived in the same way it is perceived in English. It is completely obvious (I can speak for Italian, but given the similarity I am sure the same applies to Spanish) that both “umani” (humans) and “persone” (people) include everyone, even if the first is a masculine word and the second is a feminine word, grammatically speaking. Nobody thinks of the gender of the word as the gender of the concept, because that’s not how the language works. When you want to do that, you add context that make it semantically obvious. This is apparently how English works instead, because gender has basically no other function, so you get things like the one in the screenshot, that doesn’t make any sense.

        • Match!!
          link
          fedilink
          English
          32 days ago

          every time i see a /u/mindtraveller post I’m like “that’s correct but i hate it”

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            English
            22 days ago

            Thank you, that means a lot. Remember that consensus reality is a social construct produced within the conditions of patriarchy and white supremacy.

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      73 days ago

      You mean “Latinx”? That came out of the trend for slapping Xs onto words to make them inclusive. The problem is that it can’t conjugate properly, which is why POC activists now prefer the term “Latine”.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        24
        edit-2
        3 days ago

        Latines, can’t be conjugated either, the problem is Spanish requires gender and number to match in each element of a sentence. Pretending to use “latine or latinx” ignores the fact of what comes after or before.

        Take the sentence: “Los latinos son revolucionarios.” (Latinos are revolutionaries.)

        Let’s try with “latines”: “Los latines son revolucionarios.

        This sentence is grammatically incorrect, gender and number between adjective, articles and nouns do not match. Do we make up new words? A new way of conjugating? Replace all terminations of all words with gender neutral ones?

        How about just realizing that no one would assume you are talking only about males, unless you explicitly stated: “Los hombres latinos son revolucionarios.” (Latino men are revolutionaries.) Notice how the same is true for English?

        The point is Spanish does not need a neutral gender. Partly because it does have one, but it’s only used for some objects and adjectives. “Este cuadro captura lo ominoso que vio en su pesadilla.” (This painting captures the ominous thing they saw in their nightmare.)

        “Ominous” in this sentence is being conjugated in neutral form, and using a tacit subject leaves the gender of the painter completely unmentioned.

        I don’t doubt there are people who use latinx and latine, my point is, most of the time that’s a sign of ignorance and of not having done due dilligence. Token inclusion.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        283 days ago

        In theory? I would use Latino, as in terms of pure grammar this is the correct answer, it’s not about the gender of the person, it’s about constructing the sentence following appropriate grammar.

        In practice? I would just ask what they prefer. Lol

        • @nelly_man
          link
          English
          22 days ago

          But if you were to say that you were Latino or Latina, the sentence would be grammatically correct either way. The only difference is in your gender identity. You have to assign a grammatical gender to yourself to construct the sentence, and that is where your gender identity comes into play.

          And that’s ultimately the crux of the joke in this post. Somebody says that they are neither masculine nor feminine (i.e. nonbinary). They are then given two choices of words to describe that aspect of themselves and instructed to choose one based on whether they are masculine or feminine.

          • @[email protected]
            link
            fedilink
            11 day ago

            Again, this is only true if you know nothing about Spanish. Saying “Soy una persona latina” says nothing about the gender of the speaker. Males, females and enbys are “personas latinas”. So no, you don’t need to assign yourself a gender to speak.

            My point was: It’s an ignorant joke.

            • @nelly_man
              link
              English
              11 day ago

              That’s ignoring my point. You introduce the word “persona” in order to describe yourself in a nongendered way. In Spanish, this is necessary because many adjectives need to correspond in gender with the object they are describing. If I’m describing a person directly, I need to assign them to some gender in order to properly form the adjectives.

              That is, if I wanted to say precisely that “I am American”, not that “I am an American person,” I could say either “Soy Americano” or “Soy Americana.” The former means that I identify with the masculine grammatical gender, and the latter that I identify with the feminine grammatical gender.

              Well, as somebody that identifies as a man, I’d go with the former, but it ends up saying more about myself than the English version of the sentence does. How do I specifically say, “I’m American” without relaying my gender identity or assigning myself to a category such as “person” (well, perhaps I could speak authoritatively to somebody about their native language, and that would be enough to convey the idea). In practice, this doesn’t matter, but I’m speaking very narrowly about semantics. Semantically, it’s hard to express that concept in Spanish with as little information as I’m able to provide in English. I either have to express my gender (or at the very least, one gender that I do not identify with), or indicate that I’m a person.

              • @[email protected]
                link
                fedilink
                14 hours ago

                I mean yeah… You have to use different words if you are communicating different information. Lol.

    • Basso Daniele
      link
      fedilink
      12 days ago

      Sadly this does not work for other neolatins languages like Italian, we have to stuck with tutt@ and other similar solutions

    • @[email protected]
      link
      fedilink
      English
      -2
      edit-2
      3 days ago

      “Las y los trabajadores se están radicalizando.”

      What about the nonbinary workers? Les trabajadores?

      • @calcopiritus
        link
        73 days ago

        “Les” doesn’t exist. Just use “Los trabajadores”. It means everyone, doesn’t matter their gender.

            • @[email protected]
              link
              fedilink
              02 days ago

              Not really that much of a difference honestly. My point still stands. Language is made up. We can use whatever words we want to use to convey the meaning we want as long as the people talking agree with the meaning

              • @[email protected]
                link
                fedilink
                11 day ago

                You are correct but missing a key point: Language is indeed made up, but it works because we agree on how those made up bits are meant to be used. That’s why there have dictionaries and we are taught languages in school. So yeah, you can use any sound and word you like to communicate, but that doesn’t change the fact that the noises you are making are not “real” (as in with a communally agreed meaning).

                • @[email protected]
                  link
                  fedilink
                  11 day ago

                  Read the last part of my comment again. I didn’t miss it. If two speakers agree on a new word and its meaning to the point it becomes adopted by a wider population of speakers, guess what, it becomes a standard word. By how you’re describing it, dictionaries are the progenitors of language. You have that backwards. Dictionaries are records of the language and what words are being used.

                  The only languages that do not behave this way are dead languages.

    • Gabe BellOP
      link
      English
      -83 days ago

      Okay, let’s try this again, but for an entirely different reason this time…

  • @Shardikprime
    link
    52 days ago

    Good lord not again man. You can’t dictate how we, the people from LATAM, speak our language.

    • @UnderpantsWeevil
      link
      English
      62 days ago

      Me, when I’m confronted with the prospect of introducing a grammatical neutral third gender

  • @[email protected]
    link
    fedilink
    1073 days ago

    This is a screenshot of google translate on a screenshot of a twitter thread on a screenshot on a tumblr reblog. And the tumblr part doesn’t add anything at all, but it appears on the tumblr community on lemmy. I love modern social media

  • @Voyajer
    link
    873 days ago

    My mind jumped straight to “it’s-a me! Binario!”

  • observantTrapezium
    link
    fedilink
    363 days ago

    There’s an argument to be made that “no binario” is the more correct. Latin has a neutral grammatical gender (“bīnārium”) that has been mostly assimilated into the masculine gender in Spanish.

    • @Ultraviolet
      link
      English
      35
      edit-2
      3 days ago

      This is why some people insist on the generic he in English. A few hundred years ago, some British asshole who thought Latin was a perfect language decided to impose Latin rules on English, including such nonsense as “you can’t end a sentence with a preposition” and “never split infinitives”, as well as proscribing the then-common singular they in favor of “he”. The damage he did to the English language is still not fully repaired.

      • @pyre
        link
        93 days ago

        the singular they is pretty cool

      • Gabe BellOP
        link
        English
        73 days ago

        But not ending a sentence with a preposition lead to a surprising grammar joke in “Beavis and Butthead Do America” which was one of the highlights of my early twenties.

        It was really something magnificent to behold :)

          • Gabe BellOP
            link
            English
            5
            edit-2
            2 days ago

            Yeah – it kind of loses something when you retell it out of context, but I’ll give it a go :-

            Agent Bork: Chief, you know that guy whose camper they were whacking off in?

            Agent Fleming: Bork, you’re a Federal Agent. You represent the United States government. Never end a sentence with a preposition.

            See I am a huge grammar nerd, and I find grammar jokes, and dangling modifier jokes and so on, really funny.

            But given the general level of humour in “Beavis and Butthead” I wasn’t expecting this sort of joke, and it entirely caught me by surprise, and made me laugh for five minutes. I just thought it was far funnier and far better than most of the humour in the film.

            Yeah, okay. Maybe it’s just me.

      • @_g_be
        link
        23 days ago

        Who is this Brit, I want to have a word

  • Lemminary
    link
    38
    edit-2
    3 days ago

    We default to “binario” since it’s technically the gender-neutral form but some people deliberately change it to “binaria”, “binarie” or even “binarix” to make a statement.

      • @[email protected]
        link
        fedilink
        22 days ago

        Eh, language is both fluid and made up. Patterns of sounds or squiggles that we generally agree have specific meaning

    • @Wogi
      link
      12 days ago

      Yes let’s use a letter that could only be pronounced in English for Spanish speaking people.

      Who the fuck ever came up with that is a next level idiot. Especially considering Spanish already HAS a gender neutral suffix, -e.

      Which, funnily enough would mean that non binary in Spanish would be like, no binarie. Which sounds almost identical to English.

    • Gabe BellOP
      link
      English
      33 days ago

      Isn’t that what happens when the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie?

  • @LEDZeppelin
    link
    93 days ago

    Morons who think they’re better than others: “No Binarix”

  • @daltotron
    link
    -12 days ago

    through thorough thought, yadda yadda.

    What I don’t understand is that as soon as you start criticizing other languages for similar absurdities you’re gonna get a bunch of people coming out of the woodwork to defend it. People are fine to shit on english for being a horrible language, and I’m fine with that as well because that’s true, but as soon as you criticize spanish, i.e. another language that spread to everywhere because of colonialism, you’re gonna get dogpiled about how everything is getting forced from the outside by non-native spanish speakers and how it’s all so artificial and astroturfed. But then they also don’t acknowledge these calls whenever they have come from inside the house, which is something that’s always happening, and they also won’t do anything really to refute the core logic of the critique outside of what’s basically just prescriptivism.

    I dunno, maybe it’s just because the british have sucked the fun out of everything and american imperialism has kind of given english generally a bad reputation among all of the south american countries which would generally speak spanish, and so that’s going to lead to a kind of resistance to anything seen as coming in from there, which is fair enough.

    The bigger problem I have, though, which also applies to english, is how ineffective any of these more academic strategies for change are, even if they’re mostly well-intentioned. You see this outside of language, too. As long as we’re not making some institutional change, then no progress is gonna be made because people will see it all as artificial ivory tower bullshit, and won’t wanna use it. For english, it would have to be taught in school as part of a base level curriculum, and if you’re trying to grassroots it, then it’ll have to be explained every time you use it, with every new person, which impedes communication in literal terms and means it probably won’t get picked up.

    What’s weird to me is that we can’t have that, and implicitly there can kind of be nothing that challenges the informal rules or structure of language, so no major shakeups are allowed, but still somehow we’ll see every kid on tiktok every two weeks start to accumulate some form of AAVE and then proceed to completely drive it into the ground. I guess that’s just because the internet is kind of a chaotic place and these things are primed to propagate pretty easily, but it’s kind of frustrating how totally undirected it all is, and how it all preys on our worst instincts. Means we get people that can only talk in buzzwords and call everything woke without having any formal definition for what that means really. I wonder how fast you could artificially change someone’s mind for the better if that’s what you actually wanted to do with social media. That maybe sounds villainous or manipulative, but I think we have to understand that this is something that exists and has always existed with these platforms, and by ignoring it, we just let the worst instincts and actors take over and fester instead.

    • Gabe BellOP
      link
      English
      11 day ago

      To be honest, I didn’t post this because of the fact it criticises Spanish.

      I posted it because of the last two lines – where someone refers to a non-binary girl and a non-binary boy and the guy below says “Yeah, we need to talk” cause that just made me burst out laughing when I read it :)

      But apparently I was the only one?