• @taanegl
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      831 month ago

      One of my favourite legal disclaimers of all time. It reads like Bukowskian legalese.

    • @sonovebitchOP
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      451 month ago

      That’s it? You just need to say “you know this actor character we call Tom Cruise in our show, and does the same stuff as the real actor Tom cruise in real life, it’s actually a fictional character unrelated to the real Tom Cruise in real life” and you Gucci?

      • @[email protected]
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        751 month ago

        Keep in mind that a celebrity can send you and me, regular joes, a C&D and we’d likely comply simply because we lack the resources to sustain a challenge in court.

        What stops celebrities and organizations from suing South Park creators is likely the opposite: they have money and a legal team.

        The same thing happened with John Oliver when he talked shit about some coal mine owner that was notorious for suing people. The mine owner served them from a court that had friendly laws but they were ready. And they had insurance to pay for it.

            • @Agrivar
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              31 month ago

              That whole joke doesn’t quite hit the same way, now that we know he’s actually a mentally unwell self-hating man.

              • @nomous
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                21 month ago

                Yeah funny is funny but making fun of mental health is pretty crass these days; it’s rough out here, everybody has some issues

      • @johannesvanderwhales
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        171 month ago

        This is really only to prevent them from suing and claiming that the show is representing the actions of celebrities on the show as true fact. If I publish a newspaper article saying “Donald Trump strangled a baby” without evidence then that could be actionable, as it’s a factual claim. But if I showed Donald Trump strangling babies as part of an obvious parody, then that would be protected speech. So their disclaimer is basically just to make it obvious that it’s a parody. It’s not a requirement, but they want to cover their asses.

      • @FrostyTheDoo
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        1 month ago

        If it’s all stuff he really does in real life, how could he sue over it? If it’s factual, you can’t sue. Well you could but you’d lose because South Parks lawyers would say “show me what we said that wasn’t true”

        If it’s its fictional and they clearly state at the beginning of the episode that it’s fictional and you should not assume it’s true, it’s going to be really hard to convince a judge that they were trying to trick people into thinking something was true in order to harm you.

        The first amendment allows you to make fun of people, especially if you say “we’re just being silly and none of this is serious” beforehand

      • @[email protected]
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        61 month ago

        Celebrities don’t really win anything by suing. First, they look like a cry baby. Second, the bar for slander/libel against a public figure is enormous.

      • @[email protected]
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        -31 month ago

        Apparently they actually had to have him packing fudge to call him a fudge packer and to have him in the closet.

        They couldn’t just call him a fag or they would get sued.

  • @[email protected]
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    1781 month ago

    In the United States, parody is protected by the First Amendment as a form of expression.

    • @Pacmanlives
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      1 month ago

      Yuuuup, and a lot of times the people that get parodied love it. It’s like fuck me! We made it to the point where South Park makes fun of us. Only person I know of that got pissed was Kanye but fuck that guy anyways

      • @MolochAlter
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        861 month ago

        The best thing is he apparently actually didn’t get the fish sticks joke which, if true, makes Parker and Stone the best satirists of all time on merits.

          • @TheDoozer
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            351 month ago

            Say it out loud.

            “Do you like fish sticks?”

            'Yeah

            “Then you’re a gay fish.”

            Kanye in the show didn’t get it and thought people were calling him a gay fish. So if real Kanye didn’t get the joke, and got mad because he thought South Park was calling him a gay fish… that’s just incredible.

          • @[email protected]
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            The kids came up with the joke:

            “Do you like fish sticks?” (Pronounced like “fish dicks”)

            Then, when the person said yes, they’d call them a gay fish.

            The joke becomes a meme, but Kanye West doesn’t get it, despite having it explained to him. He thinks the joke is directed at him personally, and does actual scientific research to find out why people think he is a gay fish. At the end of the episode, he accepts his fate, and decides to live as a gay fish (complete with a catchy autotuned song.)

      • @Tolstoshev
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        451 month ago

        Nirvana famously said they knew they had made it when Weird Al did a parody of Smells Like Teen Spirit.

        • @makyo
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          191 month ago

          If I recall, Weird Al tries to get permission for all his parodies too, just further adding to the point that people mostly are good with that kind of attention.

          • @Tolstoshev
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            201 month ago

            That he does. The only snafu he had was with Coolio for Gangster’s Paradise. Apparently the label said yes but didn’t actually check with Coolio and he wasn’t happy about it. Weird Al apologized for the mixup and they made peace with it later. Weird Al said the only star that has consistently turned him down was Prince, who didn’t find the whole parody thing funny.

            • @Got_Bent
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              181 month ago

              Many years later, Coolio said that he regrets his reaction and that he realizes it’s an honor to get a Weird Al parody.

              • @TrickDacy
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                111 month ago

                That warms my old cynical heart just a little

            • @fluckx
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              1 month ago

              Didn’t Paul McCartney refuse as well with the live and let die cover: “chicken pot pie”.

              Or is that just a joke I took too serious?

              Edit 2: Never mind. The cover exists. Maybe he just didn’t appreciate it

              Edit 3: it’s just not officially released according to wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_Pot_Pie

      • @MeatsOfRage
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        1 month ago

        George Clooney liked the show so much he wanted to be on the show but they rejected his request initially since they don’t let famous people play themselves. They in turn offered him the non-speaking role of Stan’s gay dog. Clooney showed up and gave a full performance of barks.

        • @[email protected]
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          111 month ago

          George Clooney was instrumental in getting the show made in the first place. He liked their second Christmas short so much that he made hundreds of copies and gave them to all his friends, which helped them pitch the show.

      • @Delphia
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        161 month ago

        And most of the ones who arent ok with it are aware of the “Streisand effect” and know that their best course of action is to either ignore it or pretend they are ok with it and wait for everyone to move on.

        • @Pacmanlives
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          61 month ago

          The Mormon church did this when the play Book of Mormon came out! Also amazing play if you have not seen it please do!!! There is a reason it won a Tony!

      • @Nikls94
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        141 month ago

        Ah yes, the gay fish

      • @rtxn
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        71 month ago

        And Kathleen “The Force Is Female” Kennedy.

      • @jaybone
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        21 month ago

        I have to doubt a lot of people love being parodied on that show. They are pretty harsh.

        • @Pacmanlives
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          -11 month ago

          I take it you don’t have a brother or any close guy friends. It’s kind of what we do. We rip on each other and buy each other a beer. Same with competitive sports. At the end of the day we respect each other but can make fun of each other and live laugh and love

          • @jaybone
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            31 month ago

            This is not like ripping on each other with your guy friends.

            And this is not like Weird Al doing a parody of one of your songs, which most musicians do see as a badge of honor.

            These are pretty damning (and accurate) personal attacks. Pretty sure j-lo, Paris Hilton and Britney Spears were not happy with their portrayal.

        • BrikoX
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          101 month ago

          In terms of parody as a whole, sure, but in cases that involve trademarks it’s huge. They completely killed the test that was set by the prior precedent case.

    • @RightHandOfIkaros
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      It should be noted that that really only applies to citizens being protected from the government (and primarily was created to protect the printing presses and media from the government). There is no legal precedent to indicate that it would apply between citizens.

      • @[email protected]
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        91 month ago

        There comes an issue when a private citizen seeks to use the engines of state to punish those whose speech offends them.

        It’s one thing to withdraw society and business from someone who offends you, quite another to demand that the state crush them for you. Of course, most states will do that to a greater or lesser degree. No state extends an absolute freedom of speech.

      • @[email protected]
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        But all kinds of other laws protect citizens from other citizens. You can’t hurt them, can’t slander them, etcetc so there’s really not much most people can do. The most of it is saying “they did a terrible parody of me” and not deal with them anymore.

      • @[email protected]
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        31 month ago

        That concept doesn’t really apply very well here.

        The government can’t make laws restricting speech(with very limited exceptions) therefore other citizens can’t legally go after you for protected speech. They’re allowed to tell you you’re an asshole, they’re allowed to ignore you, but they don’t have a court case.

  • FartsWithAnAccent
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    1 month ago

    Parody is protected under US law.

    People can (and do) sue, but they lose every time because it’s easy for their well resourced corporate legal team to prove the show is parody and thus, protected free speech.

    • @crypticthree
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      Also public figures have to prove “actual malice” in a defamation or libel case. Actual malice is an incredibly hard thing to prove.

  • @Hugin
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    1171 month ago

    Simple answer is they are careful about what they say and have good lawyers that review it.

    A few examples.

    Calling Tom Cruise a fudge packer in the context of him being in a bathhouse could eaisly open them up to liability for calling him gay. But doing it in a fudge factory while showing him putting fudge in a box gives them a clear defense that they meant it literally.

    Simmaraly telling him to come out of the closet while he is actually in a closet provides cover.

    Making things so absurd that a reasonable person wouldn’t believe it and know it’s a joke also works. So having Barbara Streisand aquire an artifact that makes her into a giant robot monster works but something plausible wouldn’t.

    Having Kanye open up and admit he is a gay fish is absurd enough to provide protection. However they probably couldn’t get away with him simply coming out as gay.

    Of course the genius of south park is they use these legal protections in ways that make the story funnier and not just for cover.

      • @Hugin
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        11 month ago

        I did. My mobile keyboard sucks and changes things when I start a new word. I often miss it.