• IndiBrony
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        191 month ago

        Thirded so long as we can drop the border down to include Cumbria, Northumberland, and Tyne & Wear… maybe North Yorkshire, too. I’d love to be Scottish if they’d be happy to have us!

        • @ThePyroPython
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          151 month ago

          If Greater Manchester declares itself a city state, please can we join? Maybe let Wales in too as long as they take responsibility for Liverpool.

          • IndiBrony
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            Manchester should be fine, and Wales is a given. Who wants to pay £4bn for a project which only benefits England?

            We may need to include Merseyside, Lancs and Cheshire just to have a land connection between New Scotland and Wales so we don’t have to consider touching England.

  • @retrospectology
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    1091 month ago

    This kind of cycle back and forth between full-throated conservative idiocy and then demanding to be saved from the consequences of their own actions is what really makes me so depressed about the majority of voters.

    I could excuse a young person maybe for being naive and inexperienced enough to think conservativism might have some kind of merit, but grown-ass adults have literally no excuse to ever believe the right-wing ever about anything.

    Not just in the UK, but everywhere.

    • AlexisFR
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      341 month ago

      Well their voting system that overinflates the seats of the winning party does not help either.

  • Thoralf Will
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    801 month ago

    Sure, no problem. But this time without all the unfair special rules and exceptions that the UK had.

    • @[email protected]
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      -41 month ago

      I fear the EU will take them right back and set a precedent for leaving and rejoining without so much problems as figuring out new contracts and agreements.
      I’d demand worse terms for every time they leave and then try to rejoin (aka the cut was 50% but now the contribution has to be at least 55%)

      • @[email protected]
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        161 month ago

        I dont think so. Its in the EU interest for them to come back in. It will show others that leaving is not a good idea. However, they wkbt want it to be easy as it might encourage others to leave. They will join in the same terms as new entrants.

        They will have to join the euro and they wont get their previous favourabke rebate for agriculture.

        Its still a good deal for both sides but Britain make a mistake, as most are aware.

      • @Aceticon
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        111 month ago

        All it takes is for one member country, no matter how tiny, to say “No” and it’s no, and in some countries like Belgium even a single region (say, “mighty” Walonia) can block it.

        For example, I expect that Spain will want Gibraltar back as a condition for a Yes on a UK Membership vote.

        • bufalo1973
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          31 month ago

          In regards of Gibraltar, the problem is it being a fiscal paradise. If one of the agreement was that Gibraltar has too have the same rules as the rest of the EU it could be enough for the Spanish government.

          And if that meant enforcing the same for Ireland and Luxemburg, even better.

          • @Aceticon
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            It’s my impression that it’s actually a lot more about national pride for Spain than about Gibraltar’s fiscal paradise status, since Gibraltar as not part of a member country can just be treated the same as any other offshore fiscal paradise, such as the Bahamas, which includes it being added to black lists. In this day and age, it’s not geographical proximity that matters when it comes to fiscal paradises.

            This makes sense since Britain too doesn’t really gain much from having possession of Gibraltar so holding on to it is mainly a question of national pride for the UK - it would be strange if Spain’s motivations were wildly different.

            PS: Also it’s funny how during the Leave campaign a lot of the “reason” why the EU would give Britain quasi-membership rights (without the responsabilities) after leaving the EU were a lot like this, about how those other countries or interests inside those countries would do it because they stood to gain monetarilly from it in the short term. All that turned out to be mainly wishful thinking and a serious misreading of the motivations of the leaders and people in said other countries.

            Just found it funny how there are still people around thinking other countries are mainly motivated by the short term gains in sovereignty affairs, even whilst Britain itself again and again keeps doing things motivated by national pride when it comes to such affairs - one would’ve expected that “they’re a lot like us” would somehow been figured out by now.

            • bufalo1973
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              230 days ago

              But “llanitos” don’t want to be Spaniards. And I respect that. So the logical way is for Gibraltar to follow the rules of the EU.

        • @MisterFrog
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          128 days ago

          A single region within a member country can veto an entire block’s will, even if the rest of the country assents? That seems very broken as a voting system, to me.

          • @Aceticon
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            Belgium has an unusual constitution that lets its regions have veto power over some of its decisions in the international stage and adding a member to the EU is actually a change to a major Treaty that Belgium is part of.

            For most EU member countries, there is no such thing, though I believe some (Luxemburg, Malta?) are actually smaller than Walonia in terms of population.

  • @[email protected]
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    Joining at this point would require an insane effort on the UKs side. I am pretty sure that an undemocratic institution like the house of lords would not be acceptable under current EU laws and that is not even accounting for the UKs voting system. The UK would also have to join the currency union. The last point alone makes rejoining very unlikely in my opinion. I think the only thing UK citizens can realistically hope for is, at best, something similar to the Norway model.

    • @CAVOKOP
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      431 month ago

      Norway is a rule taker that pays into the EU without any influence. They’re also tiny and they know it. This is said with love from a neighbour who would love to see Norway join the EU.

      I don’t think the UKs collective ego would allow them to join on Norway terms.

      • @Aceticon
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        If I remember it correctly, members of the EFTA such as Norway have a vote with veto, and during the Brexit Deal negotiations they weren’t at all keen on having the UK joining the EFTA because it’s far bigger than all the others and would likely dominate.

        • @CAVOKOP
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          330 days ago

          Yeah, all EFTA members have veto rights towards new members, and you’re pretty much correct but it’s even worse. The UK economy is bigger than all other EFTA countries combined. There’s no way they’d let the UK in.

  • Lad
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    551 month ago

    I’ve been patiently waiting for all these Brexit benefits we were promised. But they haven’t been forthcoming. In fact, it’s just been a shambles from day one. We’ve just given ourselves more problems to (not) deal with.

    • Echo Dot
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      341 month ago

      The main Brexit benefit appears to be the disintegration of the conservative party. Pretty good benefit really.

      • @[email protected]
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        81 month ago

        That’s how politics work. Conservatives do a few awful things then it swings over to the liberal side… then the liberals go a bit too fast and it swings back.

        I just can’t believe the US wasted it’s political clout on fucking Biden. Another Obama would have been killer, but instead we have the guy nobody really wants and is only chosen because his opponent is hitler 2.0

    • @Delusional
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      161 month ago

      Hey that’s exactly how it is with American conservatives. Just constantly causing more issues without solving anything whatsoever.

    • @AngryCommieKender
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      Well you forgot the most important step to get those benefits, that would be the application to become America’s 51st through 89th states. Though most of your 39 counties probably don’t have the necessary population to become their own states.

        • @AngryCommieKender
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          Could have fooled me with the Tories in power for so long trying to dismantle the NHS and all the other few benefits that you guys have over The US.

          Like you guys haven’t given Labor actual power since Thatcher and Reagan. We at least gave the Democrats a supermajority, kinda, for a total of 6 months across 3 different administrations.

          Not great, and we seem to have shown the rest of you how to turn into plutocracies.

      • @[email protected]
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        230 days ago

        That would actually be pretty good tbh, mostly because the football hooligans would have to start waving a different flag and that would be hilarious to watch.

        Also it would make the us impressively wide, almost (?) shorter to fly away from it to get to the other side.

    • IndiBrony
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      271 month ago

      When the EU turns around and predictably tells us to fuck off:

        • @Aceticon
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          31 month ago

          As the vote for new EU Members is one with veto rules, my bet is that it’s going to be an opportunity for all manner of EU members to make demands, such as Spain demanding Gibraltar back.

  • @[email protected]
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    451 month ago

    Even if that’s true (and it probably is, because it was a pretty thin majority to exit in the first place) it would be absolute political suicide to go into this election on the promise of getting us back in.

    The anti EU brigade are lunatics and people who voted leave are easily lead. The last thing we need is “Look, they’re ignoring your will!” followed by Emperor Farage…

    • @[email protected]
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      It’s a completely moot point for another reason. The EU isn’t just going to let them back in with the same sweetheart deal they got as founding members. That alone means this won’t happen for decades if at all .

        • @[email protected]
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          That will never fly with the public , especially since one of the “normal” conditions is giving up the pound, joining the Euro, and giving up direct control of their monetary policy. There is no way a majority would support that in the UK . None of these polls will even bother asking something like that. The polls are about whether they want to turn back time to before Brexit, which is somewhat interesting but isn’t possible.

    • Rob Bos
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      211 month ago

      I assume the UK would be obligated to adopt the Euro as a currency, and i have no doubt some people would absolutely rage stroke.

      • @Knock_Knock_Lemmy_In
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        31 month ago

        I don’t think that is essential for trade. A Norwegian/ Icelandic/ Swiss etc. approach could be adopted.

        • @[email protected]
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          101 month ago

          EEA does allow free movement of people though, which is most of what made us leave to start with. Mostly because of this prick pretending that hordes of dirty brown refugees were somehow the fault of that.

          • @Knock_Knock_Lemmy_In
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            430 days ago

            Yeah. If free movement of people is excluded you are down to a European Union–Turkey Customs Union type agreement.

    • @[email protected]
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      228 days ago

      Would be kind of funny if the reverse of Brexit happened. Have some pro Europe lunatics take over the fight and make a brexiteer accept the worst deal to re-enter the union.

  • @[email protected]
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    431 month ago

    I suspect that the majority of voters never wanted to leave in the first place. Results-wise, there was like 1.2% in it. And the leave voters were more likely to actually turn up. The problem is that too many “remainers” didn’t actually vote.

    • @woelkchen
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      241 month ago

      People who don’t go to elections (laziness, confidence to win anyway, boycott) accept the election’s outcome.

    • @buddascrayon
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      The original Brexit vote should have been at 2/3 majority vote. The fact that it was a simple majority was absolutely bonkers and I’m sure the ones who put it in the ballot knew exactly what they were doing. They all made massive sums of money on Brexit while the morons who voted for it are losing their shirt.

      Nowhere is this more evidenced than in this statement from the article.

      But once the 18% who say they don’t know are taken out, 52% back EU membership with 48% opposing it - a complete reversal of the 2016 Brexit referendum result.

      A full 18% of those polled couldn’t even make up their damned mind about it. And the people who wrote this chose to clip those idiots out of the picture in order to create the narrative they wanted for this clickbait as fuck article. And I will bet you anything the the Brexit framers would make serious bank on any effort to rejoin. [/removes tin hat]

      • Juki
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        111 month ago

        Oh it’s worse than that. It was never even legally binding, it was just a finger-in-the air - only after the fact was it treated like the cast iron democratic will of the people while over in the real world the Electoral Commission would’ve actually declared the whole thing void if it was a legally binding referendum because of illegal overspend by the grifters pushing it in the first place.

        The whole thing is maddening to think about, honestly

    • @TheGrandNagus
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      81 month ago

      People need to remember the vote happened immediately after the EU migration crisis. Anti-EU sentiment was at a high all across the union.

      I don’t know why people act like being anti-EU was a UK thing, not a shared issue across several members. People should remember that before they shit on the UK too much.

      Shit, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Hungary, and perhaps others had a similar or higher level of anti-EU sentiment at the time compared to the UK. It’s just that David Cameron was the only one stupid enough to gamble on having a referendum.

      • @woelkchen
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        171 month ago

        Anti EU was a UK thing. Barely anybody in mainland EU wanted to leave the union. It was and still is a topic of the far right, not centrist parties.

        • @Aceticon
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          The Leave Referendum and what happened during it and afterwards to the Tory party is a great lesson of what happens when a mainstream rightwing party starts adopting policies of the far-right.

          (The present day Tory Party is far-right by continental european standards, only headed by posh twats rather than the more traditional rabble rousers).

          Should be a lesson for similar parties in the rest of Europe, IMHO.

          • @davidagain
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            81 month ago

            It was. A lot of right wing loonies in the EU dropped their leave the EU stance because everyone around the EU saw what a stupid and annoying thing it was to leave.

        • @[email protected]
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          41 month ago

          While what you are saying is true, the far right has been gaining recently all over Europe. And they have been more vocal about what they want.

          • @woelkchen
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            31 month ago

            the far right has been gaining recently all over Europe

            The farmers who vote and promote them want to get rid of taxes on fuel for their tractors. They still want to sell their crops to European countries. European economies are more overtly connected between mainland European countries than the UK has been.

        • @TheGrandNagus
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          That is not true. Several countries had a similar or higher level of anti-EU sentiment.

          It was only after seeing Brexit struggles, as well as moving on from the 2015 refugee crisis, that anti-EU sentiment dropped.

      • @sailingbythelee
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        161 month ago

        David Cameron may have gambled on the referendum but he still only had one vote in it. The citizens of the UK as a whole own the results. Also, as I recall, there were two elections after the referendum in which UK citizens doubled-down on Brexit by returning the Conservatives to government with landslide victories.

        Also, anti-EU sentiment is one thing and may be common in various EU countries from time to time. However, voting for separation is quite another.

        In any case, with such sustained support for the Tories post-referendum, it’s hard to lay the blame for Brexit at anyone’s feet except the UK citizenry itself.

        • @TheGrandNagus
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          Nobody else voted for it because nobody else had the chance to.

          My whole point is that it’s extremely likely other countries that also experienced a wave of anti-EU sentiment would’ve voted the same way, had they been given the chance.

          I don’t know why you’d think that the UK is unique in its anti-EU streak. It was huge in a handful of places at the time.

        • @[email protected]
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          11 month ago

          While I see your point, I feel like this doesn’t take into account how our voting system can give a party a large majority even if less than half the population votes for them. Just over half the population voted for parties that weren’t pro-hard Brexit, yes the Tories got 56% of the seats on just 42% of the vote. That kind of discrepancy means it’s hard to infer the will of the people based on the composition of the Commons.

          • @sailingbythelee
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            11 month ago

            There is a pervasive idea on the internet that the popular vote is the “real” vote, compared to constituency-based voting. I don’t find that to be a helpful attitude, especially when applied selectively. We live in a representative democracy, not a direct democracy. The House of Commons is a constituent assembly, which is a valid and reasonable form of democratic representation. The election system could be changed to better reflect the popular vote, but the popular vote is not automatically more valid than the constituency-based system. There are pros and cons to both, with constiuency-based voting typically giving somewhat more weight to under-populated areas.

            The fact is that the UK voted for Brexit, directly and indirectly, multiple times and in multiple ways using its long-established voting system. There is no way to escape responsibility. Indeed, being a democracy, the citizens of the UK are ALSO responsible for their own voting system.

            • @[email protected]
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              230 days ago

              I’m not saying the popular vote is more valid than the constituency-based system. I’m saying there’s more nuance to the situation than “the population wanted Brexit because the Tories got a majority”, which is what I thought you were sayin here:

              Also, as I recall, there were two elections after the referendum in which UK citizens doubled-down on Brexit by returning the Conservatives to government with landslide victories.

              In any case, with such sustained support for the Tories post-referendum, it’s hard to lay the blame for Brexit at anyone’s feet except the UK citizenry itself.

              I can’t deny the last sentence, but using the election as evidence makes it sound like over half of the country wanted the Conservatives in power, which is demonstrably untrue, that’s the only thing I’m arguing against.

  • @[email protected]
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    341 month ago

    I would love for the UK to rejoin the EU, but the survey results mentioned in the article don’t really support the claim that there is a general desire to do so. A shift from 52% against to 52% in favor of EU membership is really not that significant.

      • @Eheran
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        101 month ago

        There has been no change for 1.5 years now, what trend? The 1.5 years where it changed a little(!) prior?

        • @PunnyName
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          The fact that in 1.5 years there was no change IS a trend.

          And notice the overall change after merely 3 years.

        • @[email protected]
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          21 month ago

          the trend between 3 years ago and now. also, don’t forget to combine that knowledge with my point 2.

          • @Eheran
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            -21 month ago

            Why specifically 3 years? Any other time frame will not support your argument? There is no trend on either direction currently, has not been for 1.5 years.

            • @PunnyName
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              Brexit happened at the end of January of 2020, so 3 years is really the only viable amount of time to consider {since this year isn’t over to be considered).

      • @[email protected]
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        21 month ago

        This is not a “will the UK try to rejoin one day” trend, this is a brexit regret trend.

        The people responding “rejoin” to these polls probably imagine that EU accession will be done on the previous terms. If you did the same graph but made it clear to pollees that rejoining would entail a switch to the Euro and many more legislative constraints, it would almost certainly read overwhelmingly “Stay out”.

          • @[email protected]
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            01 month ago

            Hahahahhahahahaha

            Go read literally any statement from EU officials on the subject. The Euro must legally be adopted by any country which has a good enough economy (exemptions aside such as the UK or Danemark IIRC).

            Sweden benefits from a loophole where they legally have to switch to the Euro but haven’t started the process yet. However, there is not a chance in hell that the EU would give the same leniency to the UK, both for political (that’d make us look “weak”) and financial (the British economy is several times larger than Sweden’s) reasons.

            The UK getting to keep the pound in a rejoin scenario is a delusion. Or at the very least the political hurdles must be made clear because it is anything BUT given (and should I remind you how the last 8 years of negotiations with the EU went?)

  • @[email protected]
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    251 month ago

    […] 43% in favour of rejoining the bloc, compared with 40% who want to stay out. But once the 18% who say they don’t know are taken out, 52% back EU membership with 48% opposing it […]

    That’s not a “majority of voters”, that’s a “majority of people who report to know what they want”. These are not the same populations.

    • @grue
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      51 month ago

      These are not the same populations.

      According to the brexiteers, it was!

      It’s only fair to use the same measurement standard now, right?

  • @EnderMB
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    221 month ago

    My hope is that Labour are playing this smart. They’ll bang on about how Brexit won’t change, but that “we’ll look to increase economic and social strengths via our relationship with the EU”. We’ll reintroduce entry to the single market, ensure freedom of movement, and basically rejoin in everything but name - and then eventually say “well, if we want to rejoin it’s basically a tick in a box”.

    The EU will likely be happy for the UK to rejoin, even without punishment. The most reliable ally in the battle against Euroscepticism is a former Eurosceptic that can say how shit things were after leaving, and how much better they are since rejoining.

    • @[email protected]
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      111 month ago

      They could do what Norway does, paying for an almost membership that doesn’t give them any voting rights.

      • @Aceticon
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        51 month ago

        Only apparently in the EU power circles nobody wants yet another “special deal” like Norway or (even worse) Switzerland.

        • @[email protected]
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          11 month ago

          Why not? Pay into the EU, adopt all EU laws, get one fishing or banking exception and no vote in laws. I’m all for it.

          • @davidagain
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            21 month ago

            There’s absolutely no chance of us getting a fishing exception. That was highly contentious when we were one of the big three EU countries. No way would they agree to that whilst also letting us back in after throwing all our toys out of the play pen.

    • @woelkchen
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      91 month ago

      If the UK applies to rejoin, this time no Thatcher UK Rebate or any other special exceptions. UK leeches were a thorn in our side for way too long. This time you better pay what you actually owe. And say bye-bye to your stupid currency. Euro adoption or nothing.

      • @Oddbin
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        01 month ago

        That’s quite an acerbic way to talk about people.

        Keep in mind 2 nations within the UK didn’t want to leave along with a large chunk of the other two.

        • @Aceticon
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          61 month ago

          I’ve lived in a couple of countries of Europe, including the UK whilst it was an EU Member.

          The spirit about the EU in the UK was always different, no “stronger as a group” mindset, always “what’s in it for me” and trying scheme after scheme to see if they could swindle the rest of the EU.

          Then on top of it all there were all the many insults to the EU - and by extention the people in it - during the Leave Referendum and even afterwards, coming from amongst others top people in party in government, including the PM.

          I remember how even the Remainers were running around with delusions of national superiority: for example one of their arguments were “We should stay and change the EU from the inside”, as if Brits knew better what the EU should be than the other 470 million people in it.

          The EU doesn’t really need that kind of member nation, more so when we’re dealing with another one like that in our midst: Hungary.

          Respect is earned, not due, and the UK has a lot of work ahead to earn it.

          • @Oddbin
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            01 month ago

            Not here to try and change your mind but I’ll reiterate what I said before, not everyone wanted to leave. The negatives you give are mostly related to Leavers. Keep that in mind when you’re being aggressively negative to the “UK”, it’s not one lump.

            • @Aceticon
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              I’m sorry but the UK is the entity we’re talking about, not actual persons - individuals can’t join or leave the EU on their own hence it’s the actions of the actual formal nation state that get judged when it comes to joining or leaving the EU.

              Consider the possibility that it’s your nationalist feelings (and given the huge role of British Nationalism in Brexit that’s not actually a good thing) that are making you confuse the country and the actions of it by the hand of it’s elective representatives, with you yourself and people like you - the actions of the nation never really represent all people in that nation and it’s not really healthy (IMHO) to identify yourself with The Nation.

              People being critical of a country seldom means they’re critical of everybody in that country, unless they’re nationalist far-right morons, in which case their problem is a lot bigger than merely talking in an acerbic way about a nation.

              • @Oddbin
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                -11 month ago

                You’ve mistaken what I said I think. I was reiterating that the UK is 4 nations. I wasn’t talking about individuals. I think it’s safe to say we’ve reached the end here though given your rhetoric to I’ll leave you to your opinions.

                • @davidagain
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                  31 month ago

                  Whilst I don’t disagree with your facts, I disagree with your tone.

                  It’s really understandable for EU folk to be angry with us. Our newspapers are toxic, the BBC promotes Farage and we were always going for British exceptionalism, with Brexit being the ultimate act of We’re Better Than You sentiment.

                  Me, you, 48% of the then voting public, Scotland and NI didn’t buy it, correct, but genuinely the right approach to EU irritation with the UK is apology, not “stop being mean” and not “it wasn’t my part of the UK”.

                  We’re not out of the woods yet. Britain’s most unelectable politician of all time, with nine losses in hand-picked constituencies may well win Clacton because the stupidly corrupt Conservative party couldn’t keep their stupidly corrupt MPs honest. How “we’re not a bunch of racist loonies” is that going to look across the channel? Yes, a bunch of us are going to turn away from the stupid racist Conservative party, but a lot of them are going to turn to the even more stupid, even more racist, even more anti EU Refuse UK Party.

                • @Aceticon
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                  Your internal organisation as a country is irrelevant on the subject of EU membership unless any of the 4 nations decides to break up from the United Kingdom and apply on their own, in which case that nation will be its own country and it won’t be about the UK anymore

                  If you don’t like the image that the British Government projects to the World about Britain, take it with them. It’s ridiculous to expect that foreigners are the ones who should refrain from criticizing of the UK’s actions in the World stage because your part of it isn’t quite like the rest, and you having such expectation betrays the huge delusions of grandeur you’re running around with.

                  (I mean, imagine, say the Flemish demanding that foreigners refrain from criticizing Belgium because they Flemish are not quite like the rest. The mind boggles).

                  Last I checked, the Scotts had a Referendum on leaving the UK and chose no, so they were OK with it. As for the rest, at least Northern Ireland is entitled by treaty to have a vote on leaving the UK and joining the Republic Of Ireland.

        • gian
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          21 month ago

          Keep in mind 2 nations within the UK didn’t want to leave along with a large chunk of the other two.

          Irrelevant. It is like saying the Lombardia and Veneto do not agree with what Italian government decide: it could be true but they cannot do whatever they want, they are part of Italy.

          • @Oddbin
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            11 month ago

            Ah, you’re Italian. That’s why you’re being a cunt. Makes sense.

            • @davidagain
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              130 days ago

              You don’t feel that’s just a bit racist?

    • @AngryCommieKender
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      1 month ago

      With the fight over the pound in the 80s and 90s when they first formed the EU, I would be very surprised if the EU didn’t force the UK to adopt the Euro to rejoin

      • @Aceticon
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        1 month ago

        Euro, Schengen and no special exceptions.

      • Echo Dot
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        -41 month ago

        Why would they. Like the above comments says they have much more to gain by UK having to slink back so why would they put barriers to that.

        It’s also not as if the pound is a particularly weak currency like the French Frank or the German Deutsche Mark was.

        • @[email protected]
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          71 month ago

          It’s also not as if the pound is a particularly weak currency like the French Frank or the German Deutsche Mark was.

          The Deutsche Mark was famously stable and the biggest official foreign exchange reserves after the dollar, it was much stronger than the pound sterling.

        • @AngryCommieKender
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          61 month ago

          They don’t want to make it easy to get back in, so that other countries aren’t tempted to leave in the first place. They shouldn’t reward temper tantrums.

          • Echo Dot
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            11 month ago

            I would have thought the inverse would have been true that they would want to reward coming back It seems like a petulant philosophical view to suggest that the EU would not let the UK back in.

            After all doing so would demonstrate that leaving is non-practical

            • @davidagain
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              1 month ago

              If a kid throws their ice cream on the floor, giving them another one soon afterwards doesn’t in any way teach the other kids not to throw their ice cream on the floor. This is very firmly a “no ice cream for you then” situation. I think labour realise they if they tried to rejoin, they would get a very rough ride indeed from the EU with massive amounts of playing hardball and that the best they can hope for in the next five years really is some softening and smoothing of the deal for being cooperative. We agree to fund EU science a bit, they let us back into erasmus, that kind of thing (although specifically not that).

              But joining the EU takes a decade or more sometimes, and the “but it’s really very simple, we follow most of the EU rules already because we’re a former member” is as stupid as the “oven ready deal” and “German car manufacturers will insist we get a great deal” nonsense.

  • Chaotic Entropy
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    201 month ago

    I’m pretty anti-brexit, but I’m not sure whether I’m pro-rejoining. Taking the clusterfuck we’ve landed in and turning it in to somehow an even bigger clusterfuck may not necessarily yield good results and definitely won’t be some silver bullet. The massive middle finger we’d justifiably get from the EU should probably give us pause.

    • @[email protected]
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      251 month ago

      This. It’s not just a switch to be flipped.

      What’s done is done. From day 1 after the referendum it was obvious to everyone that the UK would spend the next 50 years trying to mitigate the impact of that ridiculous decision. Hotting the “rejoin” button is not necessarily a short cut to the end.

    • @[email protected]
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      81 month ago

      somehow an even bigger clusterfuck

      I agree that rejoining won’t magically solve all problems but I don’t see how it would make things worse.

    • @[email protected]
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      81 month ago

      This is exactly why I don’t think they’re coming back just yet. If there’s one thing leavers and remainers agreed on it’s british exceptionalism. Remainers didn’t want to leave because EU in general was beneficial, remainers didn’t want to leave because UK had a good thing going in the EU and giving it up was stupid. Remainers want to join only if they get at least some of their special privileges back.

      Maybe in another 10 years they’ll be more receptive towards joining without special privileges.

      • @[email protected]
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        630 days ago

        I’m ready now. Fuck sterling, fuck the vetos, fuck the opt-outs, etc. Yeah, the special arrangement we had was amazing and put us in a privileged position and we’ll be diminished if we rejoin without them, but that’s still a far better situation than we find ourselves in now. So yeah, warts and all; I’m in.

        • Baggins
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          227 days ago

          We should have gone full metric and adopted the Euro years ago. Then all this bollocks about pints and good old sterling would have been done with.
          As usual with UK we do everything half arsed and settle for second best.

        • sunzu
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          -228 days ago

          Whores don’t get second chances… At least they don’t get taken back the first wife lol